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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Drostanolone
Drostanolone New-And-Improved.png
Clinical data
Trade namesDrolban, Masteril, Masteron, others (all as drostanolone propionate)
SynonymsDromostanolone; 2α-Methyl-4,5α-dihydrotestosterone; 2α-Methyl-DHT; 2α-Methyl-5α-androstan-17β-ol-3-one
Routes of
administration
Intramuscular injection (as drostanolone propionate)
Drug classAndrogen; Anabolic steroid
Legal status
Legal status
Identifiers
CAS Number
PubChem CID
ChemSpider
UNII
ChEMBL
CompTox Dashboard (EPA)
ECHA InfoCard100.000.334 Edit this at Wikidata
Chemical and physical data
FormulaC20H32O2
Molar mass304.46 g/mol g·mol−1
3D model (JSmol)
 ☒N☑Y (what is this?)  (verify)

Drostanolone, or dromostanolone, is an anabolic–androgenic steroid (AAS) of the dihydrotestosterone (DHT) group which was never marketed.[1][2][3] An androgen ester prodrug of drostanolone, drostanolone propionate, was formerly used in the treatment of breast cancer in women under brand names such as Drolban, Masteril, and Masteron.[1][2][3][4] This ester has also been used non-medically for physique- or performance-enhancing purposes.[3]

Pharmacology

Pharmacodynamics

Like other AAS, drostanolone is an agonist of the androgen receptor (AR).[3] It is not a substrate for 5α-reductase and is a poor substrate for 3α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3α-HSD), and therefore shows a high ratio of anabolic to androgenic activity.[3] As a DHT derivative, drostanolone is not a substrate for aromatase and hence cannot be aromatized into estrogenic metabolites.[3] While no data are available on the progestogenic activity of drostanolone, it is thought to have low or no such activity similarly to other DHT derivatives.[3] Since the drug is not 17α-alkylated, it is not known to cause hepatotoxicity.[3]

Chemistry

Drostanolone, also known as 2α-methyl-5α-dihydrotestosterone (2α-methyl-DHT) or as 2α-methyl-5α-androstan-17β-ol-3-one, is a synthetic androstane steroid and a derivative of DHT.[1][2][3] It is specifically DHT with a methyl group at the C2α position.[1][2][3]

History

Drostanolone and its ester drostanolone propionate were first described in 1959.[3][5] Drostanolone propionate was first introduced for medical use in 1961.[6]

Society and culture

Generic names

Drostanolone is the generic name of the drug and its INN, BAN, and DCF.[1][2] It has also been referred to as dromostanolone.[1][2]

Legal status

Drostanolone, along with other AAS, is a schedule III controlled substance in the United States under the Controlled Substances Act.[7]

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f J. Elks (14 November 2014). The Dictionary of Drugs: Chemical Data: Chemical Data, Structures and Bibliographies. Springer. pp. 652–. ISBN 978-1-4757-2085-3.
  2. ^ a b c d e f Index Nominum 2000: International Drug Directory. Taylor & Francis. January 2000. pp. 377–. ISBN 978-3-88763-075-1.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k William Llewellyn (2011). Anabolics. Molecular Nutrition Llc. pp. 517–. ISBN 978-0-9828280-1-4.
  4. ^ Bennett, MB; Helman, P; Palmer, P (1975). "Hormonal therapy of breast cancer with special reference to Masteril therapy". S. Afr. Med. J. 49: 2036–40. PMID 1242823.
  5. ^ Ringold, H. J.; Batres, E.; Halpern, O.; Necoechea, E. (1959). "Steroids. CV.12-Methyl and 2-Hydroxymethylene-androstane Derivatives". Journal of the American Chemical Society. 81 (2): 427–432. doi:10.1021/ja01511a040. ISSN 0002-7863.
  6. ^ William Andrew Publishing (22 October 2013). Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition. Elsevier. pp. 1402–. ISBN 978-0-8155-1856-3.
  7. ^ Steven B. Karch, MD, FFFLM (21 December 2006). Drug Abuse Handbook, Second Edition. CRC Press. pp. 30–. ISBN 978-1-4200-0346-8.CS1 maint: Multiple names: authors list (link)

External links

This page was last edited on 4 June 2019, at 23:53
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