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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Don Dunphy (July 5, 1908 – July 22, 1998) was an American television and radio sports announcer specializing in boxing broadcasts. Dunphy was noted for his fast-paced delivery and enthusiasm for the sport. It is estimated that he did "blow-by-blow" action for over 2,000 fights. The Friday Night Fights were broadcast every Friday evening from (radio and television (1939–1981) 9 P.M. to 10:45 P.M on ABC.

In 1984, Dunphy was part of the American Sportscasters Association Hall of Fame's inaugural class which included sportscasting legends Red Barber, Ted Husing, Graham McNamee and Bill Stern. He was also a member of the organization's Board of Directors. He was elected in 1986 to the National Sportscasters and Sportswriters Association Hall of Fame.

Dunphy was inducted into the National Radio Hall of Fame in 1988 and had a memorable cameo appearance in the 1971 Woody Allen movie Bananas. He appears as the commentator in the 1977 biopic of Muhammad Ali, "The Greatest". He also called all of the fights in the 1980 United Artists film Raging Bull, which was directed by Martin Scorsese. In 1982, he won the Sam Taub Award for Excellence in Broadcasting Journalism in boxing.[1] He is a member of the International Boxing Hall of Fame.

Dunphy was a star track athlete and went on to graduate from Manhattan College in 1930. In 1984, he was inducted into the Manhattan College Athletic Hall of Fame.[2]

His son, Don Dunphy Jr., was an executive producer of Eyewitness News on WABC-TV in New York City in its early years, and later became vice president of news services at ABC. His other son, Bob Dunphy, has been a director of Showtime Championship Boxing since 1989. In 2015 he directed the Mayweather-Pacquiao fight, the highest-grossing pay-per-view event in history.

He is buried in the Cemetery of the Holy Rood in Westbury, New York.

Selected filmography

  • Joe Frazier vs. Manuel Ramos (1968) - Himself - Ringside Commentator
  • Mac Foster vs. Jerry Quarry (1970) - Himself - Ringside Commentator
  • Dick Tiger vs. Emile Griffith (1970) - Himself - Ring Announcer
  • Bananas (1971) - Don Dunphy
  • Floyd Patterson vs. Oscar Bonavena (1972) - Himself - Ring Announcer
  • The Greatest (1977) - Commentator
  • Matilda (1978) - Ringside announcer
  • Thomas Hearns vs. Pipino Cuevas (1980) - Himself - Ringside Commentator
  • Raging Bull (1980) - Himself - Radio Announcer for Dauthuille Fight
  • The Last Fight (1983) - Radio Fight Announcer
  • The Fighter (2010) - Fight Announcer (final film role)

References

External links

This page was last edited on 9 June 2019, at 14:12
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