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Dodge T-, V-, W-Series

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dodge T- / V- / W-Series
1939 Dodge TE32 table top (6333330869).jpg
1939 Dodge TE32 "table top"
Overview
Also calledDB-, DD-Series (Dodge Canada) [1]
Fargo FH-Series [1]
Plymouth PT-Series [2]
ProductionSeptember 1938 – January 1946
Model years1939 — 1947
AssemblyWarren, Michigan, Windsor, Ontario
Body and chassis
Class12-ton to 1-ton rated light trucks
2-ton to 3-ton rated medium trucks
Body style2-door pickup truck, flatbed, stake
LayoutFR layout
RelatedDodge WC series
Powertrain
Enginestraight-six Chrysler flathead from 201–331 cu in (3.3–5.4 L)
Transmissionthree- or four-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase105–235 in (267–597 cm)
Chronology
Predecessor1933–1938 Dodge H-, K, and M-Series
SuccessorDodge B Series

In 1939 Dodge presented a completely new designed line of pickups and trucks. Formally the T series for 1939, V series for 1940, and the W series from 1941 through 1947, the trucks became mostly known as the Dodge Job-Rated trucks.

With streamlined, Art Deco styled front sheetmetal, and introducing the concept of "Job-Rated" truck configurations, Dodge tried to offer customers the truck that fit the job they were buying it for.[3] As a result, the 1939 to 1947 Dodge pickup / truck range was offered in a bewilderingly large number of available variants and model codes.

Six different payload classes, a wide range of bodies, and more than twenty different wheelbase-lengths were manufactured,[nb 1] and fitted with different sized versions of the Chrysler-sourced inline six-cylinder side-valve engines — from the half-ton TC pickup on a 116-inch wheelbase to three-ton tractor cabs. Nevertheless, mechanically, the trucks were all very similar, with solid axles front and rear and leaf springs at all four corners. With World War II taking up most of production capacity from 1942 to 1945, the 1939 styling continued largely unchanged through 1947, as engineering and production became the main focus.

The Dodge trucks enjoyed some popularity before the war, and the last of them built in 1942, before Dodge turned to mostly military production, had progressed to the W-series model name. When they resumed sales post-war, they continued as the 1946 Dodge W-series.[5]

Historic author on Dodge trucks, Don Bunn, noted that the 1939 to 1947 Job-Rated trucks represent a very significant segment in Dodge history. They were the first to be mass-produced in the new, huge (Mound Road) Warren truck plant. The Job-Rated trucks also formed the basis for Dodge's first light-duty military four-wheel drives, the 1940 half-ton Dodge VC series, which in turn further developed into the world's first factory 4WD commercial pickups: the Dodge Power Wagon. And lastly, Dodge was the first of the Big Three U.S. auto manufacturers to offer a diesel powered truck — all the more exceptional, given that Chrysler engineered and built their heavy-duty diesel engines all in-house. Today, this series is the most popular pickups with Dodge truck collectors.[6]


General

File:1939 Dodge Pickup with wooden bed.
File:1939 Dodge Pickup with wooden bed.
Ram hood ornaments adorned every Dodge car and truck from 1932 to 1954.[7]
Ram hood ornaments adorned every Dodge car and truck from 1932 to 1954.[7]

After Dodge joined forces with Graham Brothers trucks from 1925 onwards, Dodge and Graham trucks, marketed through Dodge's vast dealer network, were offered in various capacities, ranging from a half ton to three tons. In May of 1928 Power Wagon magazine already computed a "truly impressive" 1,842 possible configuration combinations, of available models, styles, payload ratings and other options.[8]

For 1939, Dodge rolled out a striking, modern design, new from the ground up, except for the updated drivetrains – and, as before, offering an exceptionally large number of available variants. In the later 1930s, streamlined styling had become a virtual requirement for anything from appliances, cars, boats, planes — even trucks, trains, and architecture.[6] The new, 'Job-Rated' Dodge trucks followed suit, and were completely representative of the 'Streamline Moderne', Art Deco based style, inspired by aerodynamic design, and characterized by elongated horizontal lines and curving forms, to give the impression of sleekness and modernity.

The all new, all-steel cabs featured a front-end design with a barrel-shaped base, and a sharp V-shaped grille; long, sleek, crowned front and rear fenders, with embossed "speed lines" on the lower rears of each fender – and a new sloped, two-piece windshield, that could be opened for increased airflow. The headlamps were still free-standing, but were mounted in bullet-shaped pods. From the half-tons to the three-ton models, the new trucks all featured the same distinctive design – the heavy-duty models only stood out taller, on larger wheels and tires.[6]

The unique styling of the trucks, was only really changed in 1940, when Dodge trucks began using sealed-beam headlamps and were equipped with marker lights mounted on the headlamp housing. For the most part, after 1940, year-to-year appearance changes were very minimal.[9] The grille design was lightly changed again in 1941, and this style continued through 1947, except for the lower chrome strips, which were omitted post war.[6]

The Job-Rated trucks had stronger frames than previous Dodge trucks, using steel with a higher tensile strength, and the frame-rails extended further forward past the engine than before, such that the truck's beefy, channel-type bumpers tied the rails together, reinforcing the frame. After World War II, several changes were made to production truck chassis parts, based on reliability experience gained during military service – for instance stronger differentials and larger axle shafts were used in post-war trucks, and steering boxes were beefed up as well.[9]

All in all, Dodge advertised as many as 175 basic chassis models, and seven engine variants, as well as different "job-rated" choices of clutches, transmissions, axles, gear ratios, springs, tires and brakes.[10] In 1941, General Motors introduced new trucks for Chevrolet and GMC, that literally became known as their Art Deco trucks, and advertised them as "The Right Trucks for all Trades".[11] Both Dodge's job-rated trucks, and GM's Art-Decos are recognized as prime truck examples of the 1930s Streamline Moderne architecture and design style.

Model name codes

Introduced as the T-Series for the 1939 model year, the line evolved into the V-series for 1940, and W-series for 1941, but the 'W' was retained until the end of sales in 1947.

The bottom of the range TC, and its successors VC and WC, were ​12-ton rated, on a 116 in (295 cm) wheelbase. As the second letter in the model code progressed in the alphabet, the payload rating typically also went up, however this was not implemented consistently. Although the TD-15, VD-15 and WD-15 were ​34-ton rated, the TD-20 and -21 and its later VD and WD versions were one-tonners. The -15s and the -20s had a 120 in (305 cm) wheelbase, but the 1-ton could also be had with 133 in (338 cm) (the TD-/VD-/WD-21). Second letter 'E' models only existed in the form of the 1939 TE versions. TF-, VF-, and WF-models were either 1-ton or ​1 12-ton,[nb 2] ranging in wheelbase from 126–190 in (320–483 cm). Second letter G- and H-models were consistently ​1 12-ton and 2-ton rated, respectively, ranging in wheelbase from 136–220 in (345–559 cm). The ​2 12-ton rated J-models weren't introduced until the 1946 WJ-55 through WJ-59, ranging from 136–235 in (345–597 cm) in wheelbase. The K-lettered models were consistently 3-ton rated, but the L-lettered models went against the naming pattern – they were only 2-ton rated. Both were offered in wheelbases ranging 152–205 in (386–521 cm) through 1942. From 1946 instead there were 3-ton WK- and WR-models ranging in wheelbase from 136–196 in (345–498 cm).

Drivetrain

Dodge's Job-Rated trucks used flathead sixes, originally developed by Plymouth,[3] throughout the 1939–1947 range. In the light half-ton trucks initially a 201.3 cu.in. engine was standard; with 70 Hp in 1939, but uprated to 79 Hp in 1940,[12] and 82.5 Hp by 1941. The three-quarter and one-ton trucks used a 217.8 cu.in. engine from 1939 to 1941, rated at 77 Hp initially, then at 82 Hp, and at 85 Hp in 1941.

Starting in 1942 (just before civilian production ended), the 201.3 cu.in. engines were dropped from the range, and the ​12-ton light-duty models received the larger 218 cu.in. six, like the 3/4-ton pickups, going up to 95 HP (gross) after the war, while the one-ton trucks got a larger 230.2 cu.in. (instead of the 218), with 102 horsepower, until the line-up was replaced in 1947.[6] A three-speed manual was standard issue, while a four-speed with a compound first gear was an option.[9]

The 1939–1947 TK- and TL- through WK- and WL-models were also available with a diesel engine – Dodge's own diesel engine – Dodge and Mack Trucks were the only two American automakers of the period before World War II, to have their own diesel engines.[3] An additional 6-volt auxiliary generator debuted in 1941 on the diesel engines. The unit furnished power for lighting, instruments, and horns. Diesel sales were extremely limited however, counting as many as 75 units sold in 1939, 134 units in 1940, and 195 rigs in 1941.[13]

Bodies and options

Besides with the "Express" pick-up bodywork, the Job-Rated trucks were available in cab/chassis, cowl/chassis, or bare chassis (for third party custom body) versions.

At the bottom of the range, Dodge offered the three now common pick-up classes (​12-ton, ​34-ton and one-ton), as well as a 1​12-ton pick-up. Dodge's half-ton pickups, on a 116 in (2.95 m) wheelbase with a 7​12-foot box, were changed to the 70 HP 201 cu.in. L-head straight-six. The 3/4- and 1-ton models kept the 75 HP 218 cubic inch L-head six, either on a 120 in (3.05 m) wheelbase with a 7​12-foot box, or a 133 in (3.38 m) wheelbase with a 9-foot bed. Dodge's 1​12-ton pick-up, offered from the Job-Rated trucks launch in 1939 until the 1942 switch to all-wartime production, consisted of the long-wheelbase one-ton model with 9-foot bed, but on bigger wheels and tires.

Aside from as pickups, the lightest models in the range, the 116 in (2.95 m) wheelbase TC/VC/WC half-tons, were also offered as a delivery truck, either with solid steel "panel" van body, or open canvas-covered canopy or screenside configuration.[14]

After the war, both the 1​12-ton pickup, and the long one-ton pickup with the nine-foot bed were dropped.[6] Post-war available equipment options included a larger clutch, four-speed transmission, oversize tires, electric driver's wiper, heater, chrome windshield frame, adjustable visor, driver's armrest, dome light, turn signals, "airfoam" seat with leather upholstery, and an AM radio.[5]

Models used by the military

Purpose-built four-wheel drive

1940 Fargo-badged truck at the Australian Army History Unit museum.
1940 Fargo-badged truck at the Australian Army History Unit museum.

After Dodge supplied the U.S. Army with its first four-wheel drive truck in 1934, more modern ​1 12-tonners were developed, and 1,700 RF-40-X-4(USA) trucks were supplied in 1938, and 292 TF-40-X-4(USA) in 1939.[15][16] In 1940, Dodge gained an Army contract to design and build ​12-ton 4×4 military trucks in several styles using many commercial truck parts. Based on the VC-Series, and internally called the T-202 series, the VC-1 through VC-6 came with essentially stock front-end sheetmetal. Similarly, their 116-inch wheelbase and 201-cubic-inch 79-horsepower six-cylinder engine shared much with Dodge's civilian ​12-ton VC. The following year, the T202 was replaced by the T-207 series trucks. Again rated as ​12-tonners, they featured a military-specific hood, grille, and fenders. These trucks were powered by the 218-cubic-inch six of 85 horsepower taken from Dodge's ​34- and one-ton commercial models.[12] Eventually, the military trucks were substantially redesigned, and uprated to ​34-tons with a 230-cubic-inch engine with 92 Hp. Together with the 1941 ​12-tons, these were built from 1942 until the end of the war as the Dodge WC series military trucks. Some 30 were modified as armored trucks by the French in Syria prior to WWII and known as the Automitrailleuse Dodge 'Tanake.'[17] "These trucks served with Foreign Legion units before the war, and both Vichy and Free French units during WW2. After the war, the trucks remaining in the country passed on to the Syrian government, and some were used during the 1948 war."[18] The Tanake was fitted with a 37mm cannon M1916 and 2 or 3 FM 24/29 light machine guns and a crew of 5.[19]

Stock models and specifications

Dodge T-234 Lend-Lease truck
Dodge T-234 Lend-Lease truck

The U.S. military also used some of Dodge's light truck models in mostly stock, two-wheel drive form. Technical manuals of U.S. Army military vehicles offer some more detailed specifications on three such models: the 1947 model year WC and WD-15 models, and the 160 inch wheelbase version of the SNL G-number 618 aka the WF-32.

Additionally there were 4x2, civilian based variants built either as Canadian "Modified Conventional Pattern" or "Canadian Military Pattern trucks", called the D15 (15cwt, or ¾-ton – engineering code T-222), and the D60S and D60L (60cwt, or 3-ton, engineering code T-110, with a short 136" or long 160" wheelbase).[1] The Canadian models were built with a 236.6 cu in (3,877 cm3) engine with a 25" block, that was unique to them, and they had beefed up rear axles. Chrysler Corporation of Canada produced a total of 180,816 military Dodge trucks during 1939-1945.[20][21]

Dodge T-234 "China / Burma" truck

A special case in between stock commercial and dedicated military trucks, was the T-234 "China / Burma Road" truck, which was built as part of the Allied cooperation with China against Japan, in the war and just thereafter. From October 1944 through March 1946, Dodge built 15,000 trucks, that used a special order combination of their most heavy-duty off-the-shelf components, to overland supplies from India to China over the very rough Stilwell / Ledo Road, to an extent to specifications personally drawn up by Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek, then commander of the Nationalist Chinese forces.[22] Chiang Kai-shek asked Roosevelt himself for 15,000 two-and-a-half-ton trucks capable of handling the Burma Road, requiring them to have an engine of at least 300 cubic inches and a 5-speed transmission.[22]
The trucks were built with a near standard civilian closed cab – right-hand drive because the British were in command of Burma – but fitted with a flat, military-style grille & brush guard, and wide open, almost flat fenders, to avoid mud build-up clogging the wheels rotating,[22] and otherwise stood out by having a 60-gallon fuel tank.[23] In order for the trucks to function on the gruelling 4,700 mile journey over the Himalayas, Dodge fitted not only heavy-duty springs and steering gear, but went sofar as to fit tri-metal aircraft grade bearings and aeroplane-type shock absorbers. Radiators were fitted with an overflow tank, to return the cooled water to the sealed cooling system. Ground clearance was 13 in (33 cm), with a 50° approach angle, and 28.5° departure.[24] Front axles were widened to give wider tread. Nevertheless, the average life of the trucks was only about five trips.[25]

It has been commented that the front sheet metal design of the T-234 Burma Dodge shows remarkable resemblance to that of the post-war Dodge Power Wagons, and may well have influenced it.[25]

Specifications table

This table offers specifications for a few high-profile models in the extensive 1939–1947 range only.

Model Dodge WC [26] Dodge WD-15 [26] Dodge WF-32 [27] Dodge D60S [28][20] Dodge T-234 "Burma" [23]
Body style Express body pickup Express body pickup Closed cab, stake and platform Closed Cab, Dump truck Closed cab, stake and platform
Model year 1947 1947 1941-1947 1939–1942 1944–1946
Rating 12-ton 34-ton 1 12-ton 3-ton 3-ton
Engine 217.8 cu in (3,569 cm3) 217.8 cu in (3,569 cm3) 236.6 cu in (3,877 cm3) 236.6 cu in (3,877 cm3) 331.4 cu in (5,431 cm3)
Power 85 HP @ 3000 rpm 85 HP @ 3000 rpm 104 HP @ 3000 rpm 95 HP @ 3600 rpm 118 HP @ 2800 rpm
Torque 170 lb⋅ft (230 N⋅m) @ 1200 rpm 170 lb⋅ft (230 N⋅m) @ 1200 rpm 190 lb⋅ft (258 N⋅m) @ 1500–2200 rpm 262 lb⋅ft (355 N⋅m) @ 1200 rpm
Max speed 64 mph (103 km/h) [nb 3] 62 mph (100 km/h) [nb 4] 45 mph (72 km/h) [nb 3] 39.7 mph (64 km/h) [25]
Max grade loaded [nb 5] 37 percent 30 percent 49.9 percent 40 percent [25]
Wheelbase 116 in (2.95 m) 120 in (3.05 m) 160 in (4.06 m) 136 in (3.45 m) 170 in (4.32 m)
Front track 55.8 in (1.42 m) 55.9 in (1.42 m) 57.8 in (1.47 m) 70 34 in (1.80 m)
Rear track 61.1 in (1.55 m) 60.2 in (1.53 m) 63.8 in (1.62 m) 72 in (1.83 m)
Length 183.3 in (4.66 m) 183.3 in (4.66 m) 253.5 in (6.44 m) 204.5 in (5.19 m) 265 932 in (6.74 m)
Width 74.1 in (1.88 m) 74.1 in (1.88 m) 88 in (2.24 m) 84 in (2.13 m) 88 in (2.24 m)
Height 74.1 in (1.88 m) 75.8 in (1.93 m) 82.7 in (2.10 m) 83 in (2.11 m) 115.5 in (2.93 m)
Net weight 3,365 lb (1,530 kg) 3,200 lb (1,450 kg) 5,580 lb (2,530 kg) 7,640 lb (3,470 kg) 9,910 lb (4,500 kg)
Gross weight 4,365 lb (1,980 kg) 4,700 lb (2,130 kg) 8,750 lb (3,970 kg) 20,000 lb (9,070 kg)
Payload 1,000 lb (450 kg) 1,500 lb (680 kg) 3,170 lb (1,440 kg)
Tires 6.50 x 16 7.00 x 15 7.50 x 20 8.25 x 20 [nb 6] /
later 10.50 x 16 [nb 7]
10.00 x 20
Transmission three speed manual three speed manual four speed manual four speed manual five speed manual
Gearing High 1 : 1 / Low 3.3 : 1 High 1 : 1 / Low 3.3 : 1 High 1 : 1 / Low 6.4 : 1 high and low range High / Low 8.4 : 1
Fuel 72 octane gasoline 70 octane gasoline 70 octane gasoline
Fuel capacity 18 US gal (68 l) 18 US gal (68 l) 18 US gal (68 l) 60 US gal (227 l)
Range loaded 216 mi (348 km) 162 mi (261 km) 125 mi (201 km) 285 mi (459 km) [25]

Model table

1939 Dodge TXE32 Wrecker
1939 Dodge TXE32 Wrecker
1946 Dodge pickup
1946 Dodge pickup
Australian National Airways Freighter Service van, 1946 model
Australian National Airways Freighter Service van, 1946 model
1947 Dodge pickup
1947 Dodge pickup
1947 Dodge 1 ton Truck
1947 Dodge 1 ton Truck

Dodge offered their 1939–1947 'Job-Rated' trucks in many variants. This table was compiled based on scanned images of parts books pages, showing model numbers, payload ratings, engine numbers, wheelbase and other information from factory MoPar parts books, covering Dodge and Fargo trucks manufactured from 1939-1977,[29][30][31][32][33][34] complemented with information about Dodge engine & engineering codes from the same website,[1] the Dodge truck wheelbase table on the "Town Wagon '39–'47 site,[2] and various other sources.

Models with a "D" as the third letter in the model code, and marked with D behind the engine code, indicate models that were offered with a diesel engine.

Model(s) Model year Engine Displacement Power Rating Wheelbase
TC 1939 T-68 201.3 cu in (3,300 cm3) [35][36][9] 70 HP [35][36][9] ½-ton 116 in (2.95 m)
TD-15 1939 T-70 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [35][36][9] 77 HP [35][36][9] ¾-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
TD-20 1939 T-72 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [35][36][9] 77 HP [35][36][9] 1-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
TD-21 1939 T-72 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
TE-20 1939 T-74 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
TE-21 1939 T-74 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
TE-22 1939 T-74 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
TE-30 1939 T-74 218.1 cu in (3,570 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
73 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
TE-31 1939 T-74 218.1 cu in (3,570 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
73 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
TE-32 1939 T-74 218.1 cu in (3,570 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
73 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
TF-29, TFA-29 1939 T-76 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
TF-30, TFA-30 1939 T-76 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
TF-35, TFA-35 1939 T-76 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
78 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
TF-36, TFA-36 1939 T-76 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
78 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
TF-37(-X), TFA-37 1939 T-76 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
78 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
TF-38(-X), TFA-38 1939 T-76 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) [37][38]
or 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9]
78 HP [37][38]
or 77 HP [9]
1½-ton 190 in (4.83 m)
TF-39 1939 T-76 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 77 HP [9] 1½-ton 182 in (4.62 m)
TG-40, TGA-40 1939 T-78 1½-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
TG-41, TGA-41 1939 T-78 1½-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
TG-42, TGA-42 1939 T-78 1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
TG-43, TGA-43 1939 T-78 1½-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
TG-44, TGA-44 1939 T-78 1½-ton 220 in (5.59 m)
TH-45, THA-45 1939 T-78 2-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
TH-46, THA-46 1939 T-78 2-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
TH-47, THA-47 1939 T-78 2-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
TH-48, THA-48 1939 T-78 2-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
TH-49, THA-49 1939 T-78 2-ton 220 in (5.59 m)
TK-60, TKA-60 1939 T-80 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
TK-61, TKA-61 1939 T-80 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
TK-62, TKA-62 1939 T-80 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
TK-63, TKA-63 1939 T-80 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
TKD-60, TKDA-60 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
TKD-61, TKDA-61 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
TKD-62, TKDA-62 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
TKD-63, TKDA-63 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
TL-50, TLA-50 1939 T-80 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
TL-51, TLA-51 1939 T-80 2-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
TL-52, TLA-52 1939 T-80 2-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
TLD-50, TLDA-50 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
TLD-53, TLDA-53 1939 T-84 D 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) [13] 96 HP [13] 2-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
VC 1940 T-92 201.3 cu in (3,300 cm3) 79 HP [39] ½-ton 116 in (2.95 m)
VD-15 1940 T-94 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 82 HP [9] ¾-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
VD-20 1940 T-96 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 82 HP [9] 1-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
VD-21 1940 T-96 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) [9] 82 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
VF-20, VFA-20 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
VF-21, VFA-21 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
VF-22, VFA-22 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
VF-27 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) ¾-ton [40] 126 in (3.20 m) [40]
VF-28 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) ¾-ton [40] 133 in (3.38 m) [40]
VF-29, VFA-29 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) ¾-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
VF-30, VFA-30 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1½-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
VF-31, VFA-31 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1½-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
VF-32, VFA-32 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
VF-33, VFA-33 1940 T-98 228.1 cu in (3,740 cm3) 1½-ton 190 in (4.83 m)
VF-39 1940 T-102 1½-ton [40] 182 in (4.62 m) [40]
VG-40, VGA-40 1940 T-100 1½-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
VG-41, VGA-41 1940 T-100 1½-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
VG-42, VGA-42 1940 T-100 1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
VG-43, VGA-43 1940 T-100 1½-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
VG-44, VGA-44 1940 T-100 1½-ton 220 in (5.59 m)
VH-45, VHA-45 1940 T-100 2-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
VH-46, VHA-46 1940 T-100 2-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
VH-47, VHA-47 1940 T-100 2-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
VH-48, VHA-48 1940 T-100 2-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
VH-49, VHA-49 1940 T-100 2-ton 220 in (5.59 m)
VK-60, VKA-60 1940 T-104 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
VK-61, VKA-61 1940 T-104 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
VK-62, VKA-62 1940 T-104 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
VK-63, VKA-63 1940 T-104 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
VKD-60, VKDA-60 1940 T-106 D 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
VKD-61, VKDA-61 1940 T-106 D 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
VKD-62, VKDA-62 1940 T-106 D 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
VKD-63, VKDA-63 1940 T-106 D 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
VL-50, VLA-50 1940 T-104 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
VLD-50, VLDA-50 1940 T-106 D 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
VLD-51, VLDA-51 1940 T-106 D 2-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
VLD-53, VLDA-53 1940 T-106 D 2-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
VR-40, VRA-40 1940 T-90 1½-ton 105 in (2.67 m)
VR-42, VRA-42 1940 T-90 1½-ton 129 in (3.28 m)
VR-43, VRA-43 1940 T-90 1½-ton 159 in (4.04 m)
VS-45, VSA-45 1940 T-90 2-ton 105 in (2.67 m)
VS-47, VSA-47 1940 T-90 2-ton 129 in (3.28 m)
VS-48, VSA-48 1940 T-90 2-ton 159 in (4.04 m)
WC 1941 T-112 201.3 cu in (3,300 cm3) 82.5 [9] ½-ton 116 in (2.95 m)
WC 1942 T-112 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) 85 HP [9] ½-ton 116 in (2.95 m)
WC 1946-1947 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) 95 HP [5][6] ½-ton 116 in (2.95 m)
WD-15 1941-1947 T-114 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) 85 HP [9] ¾-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
WD-20 1941 T-114 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) 85 HP [9] 1-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
WD-20 1942-1947 T-116 230.2 cu in (3,770 cm3) [9] 102 HP [9] 1-ton 120 in (3.05 m)
WD-21 1941 T-116 217.8 cu in (3,570 cm3) 85 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
WD-21 1942-1947 T-116 230.2 cu in (3,770 cm3) [9] 102 HP [9] 1-ton 133 in (3.38 m)
WF-20, WFA-20 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
WF-21, WFA-21 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1-ton 135 in (3.43 m)
WF-22, WFA-22 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
WF-23 1945-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1-ton 190 in (4.83 m)
WF-30, WFA-30 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 126 in (3.20 m)
WF(X)-31, WFA(X)-31 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 135 in (3.43 m)
WF(X)-32, WFA(X)-32 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
WF-33, WFA-33 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 190 in (4.83 m)
WF(X)-34, WFA(X)-34 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
WF(X)-36, WFA(X)-36 1941-1947 T-118 236 cu in (3,870 cm3) 104 HP 1½-ton 200 in (5.08 m)
WF-39 1941-1947 T-122 228 or 236 cu in (3.7 or 3.9 l) 1½-ton 182 in (4.62 m)
WG-40, WGA(X)-40 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 1½-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
WG-41, WGA(X)-41 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 1½-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
WG-42, WGA(X)-42 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 1½-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
WG-43, WGA(X)-43 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 1½-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
WG-44, WGA(X)-44 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 1½-ton 190 in (4.83 m)
WH(X)-45, WHA(X)-45 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 2-ton 136 in (3.45 m)
WH(X)-46, WHA(X)-46 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 2-ton 148 in (3.76 m)
WH(X)-47, WHA(X)-47 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 2-ton 160 in (4.06 m)
WH(X)-48, WHA(X)-48 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 2-ton 178 in (4.52 m)
WH(X)-49, WHA(X)-49 1941-1947 T-120 241 or 251 cu in (3.9 or 4.1 l) 2-ton 220 in (5.59 m)
WJ-55 1946-1947 T-136 281.6 cu in (4,610 cm3) 2½-ton [41] 136 in (3.45 m) [41]
WJ-56 1946-1947 T-136 281.6 cu in (4,610 cm3) 2½-ton [41] 142 in (3.61 m) [41]
WJ-57 1946-1947 T-136 281.6 cu in (4,610 cm3) 2½-ton [41] 160 in (4.06 m) [41]
WJ-58 1946-1947 T-136 281.6 cu in (4,610 cm3) 2½-ton [41] 178 in (4.52 m) [41]
WJ-59 1946-1947 T-136 281.6 cu in (4,610 cm3) 2½-ton [41] 235 in (5.97 m) [41]
WK-60, WKA-60 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
WK-61, WKA-61 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
WK-62, WKA-62 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
WK-63, WKA-63 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
WKD-60, WKDA-60 1941-1942 T-126 D 3-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
WKD-61, WKDA-61 1941-1942 T-126 D 3-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
WKD-62, WKDA-62 1941-1942 T-126 D 3-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
WKD-63, WKDA-63 1941-1942 T-126 D 3-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
WL-50, WLA-50 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
WL-51, WLA-51 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 2-ton 170 in (4.32 m)
WL-52, WLA-52 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 2-ton 188 in (4.78 m)
WL-53, WLA-53 1941-1942 T-124 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 2-ton 205 in (5.21 m)
WLD-50, WLDA-50 1941-1942 T-126 D 2-ton 152 in (3.86 m)
WK-65, WR-65 1946-1947 T-135 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton [41] 136 in (3.45 m) [41]
WK-66, WR-66 1946-1947 T-135 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton [41] 142 in (3.61 m) [41]
WK-67, WR-67 1946-1947 T-135 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton [41] 160 in (4.06 m) [41]
WK-68, WR-68 1946-1947 T-135 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton [41] 178 in (4.52 m) [41]
WK-69, WR-69 1946-1947 T-135 331 cu in (5,420 cm3) 3-ton [41] 196 in (4.98 m) [41]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ In 1940 alone, 20 different truck frames were simultaneously produced in the same year.[4]
  2. ^ Except for the 1940 ​34-ton rated VF-27 through VF-29
  3. ^ a b governed
  4. ^ recommended
  5. ^ computed ability in lowest gear
  6. ^ with dual rear wheels
  7. ^ with single rear wheels

References

  1. ^ a b c d T Flathead Six Engines – T137.com
  2. ^ a b 1939 to 1947 Dodge Truck Wheel Bases – townwagon.com
  3. ^ a b c "History of the Dodge Pickup Trucks, 1921-1953". Allpar. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  4. ^ 1940 Dodge trucks brochure page (archived)
  5. ^ a b c 1946 Dodge WC Pickup – howstuffworks
  6. ^ a b c d e f g Bunn, Don (2009). "Dodge Trucks History: Segment Five: 1939 to 1947 Job-Rated Pickups". PickupTruck.Com. Classified Ventures LLC. Archived from the original on 2010-11-30. Retrieved 2019-08-20.
  7. ^ Avard T. Fairbanks, designer of the Dodge Ram symbol and the Plymouth Flying Lady hood ornaments – Allpar
  8. ^ "The Graham Legacy: Graham-Paige To 1932" by M Keller. – Antique Automobile Club of America (archived)
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az McNessor, Mike (2012). "1939-1947 Dodge Trucks – Dodge's Job Rated haulers". Hemmings Motor News. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  10. ^ period Dodge advertisement (archived)
  11. ^ Shining Design: 1941-'47 Chevrolet – Hemmings
  12. ^ a b 1946-1948 Dodge Power Wagon – HowStuffWorks
  13. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m 1916 to 1975 Dodge Diesel Engines – Diesel Power Magazine
  14. ^ 1939 Dodge TC half ton Owner Manual Pickup Truck Panel Screenside Canopy Guide – eBay (archived)
  15. ^ 1943 Dodge WC-51 Weapons Carrier, Power & Glory – FourWheeler.com
  16. ^ "Serial Number Guide – Dodge trucks for the U.S. government". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  17. ^ Surviving French Armoured Vehicles [http://the.shadock.free.fr/Surviving_French_Armoured_Vehicles.pdf
  18. ^ Ibid.
  19. ^ Automitrailleuse Dodge, Wheeled Fighting Vehicle Data Sheets © David R. Haugh, 2002 [1]
  20. ^ a b Vanderveen, Bart (1972). "British Commonwealth - Trucks, 3-Ton, 4x2". Observer's Fighting Vehicle Directory, WW II. London: F. Warne. p. 236. ISBN 978-0723214694. Archived from the original on 2018-03-03.
  21. ^ Granatstein, Jack (27 May 2005). Arming the Nation: Canada's Industrial War Effort 1939–1945 (PDF) (Report). Canadian Council of Chief Executives. p. 12. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-12-13. Retrieved 2018-03-06.
  22. ^ a b c Redgap, Curtis (2010). "Dodge Military Trucks and the Burma Road in World War II". Allpar. VerticalScope Inc. Retrieved 2018-05-19.
  23. ^ a b Clancey, Patrick. "The Chrysler-Dodge Burma Truck". Ibiblio.org. HyperWar foundation. Retrieved 2018-05-19.
  24. ^ Specification sheet (archived)
  25. ^ a b c d e McShane, Sandy. "On the Road to Mandalay". Classic Truck. ImageEvent. pp. 66–69. Archived from the original on 2018-08-08. Retrieved 2019-04-04.
  26. ^ a b TM 9-2800 – MILITARY VEHICLES (PDF). Technical Manual. Department of the Army. 1953. pp. 163, 168.
  27. ^ TM 9-2800 – MILITARY VEHICLES (PDF). Technical Manual. Department of the Army. 1 October 1947. p. 243.
  28. ^ Forum page with D60S specs (archived)
  29. ^ "Serial Number Guide – RD-10 to TD-21". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  30. ^ "Serial Number Guide – TE-20 to TLA-52". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  31. ^ "Serial Number Guide – TLD-50 to VFA-33". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  32. ^ "Serial Number Guide – VG-40 to VSA-48". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  33. ^ "Serial Number Guide – WC to WFA-33". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  34. ^ "Serial Number Guide – WGM-40 to WLDA-50". T137.com. Archived from the original on 2016-07-18. Retrieved 2018-02-15.
  35. ^ a b c d e f 1939 Dodge ½-ton, ¾-ton & 1-ton Trucks TC & TD series Brochure (archived)
  36. ^ a b c d e f 1939 Dodge ½-ton, ¾-ton & 1-ton trucks specifications (archived)
  37. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n 1939 Dodge 1½-ton trucks brochure (archived)
  38. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n 1939 Dodge 1½-ton trucks brochure – specifications (archived)
  39. ^ David Doyle: Standard Catalog of U.S. Military Vehicles - 2nd Edition, pg. 44
  40. ^ a b c d e f Dodge Truck 1940 Model Series – General Information
  41. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Dodge Job-Rated truck parts list – Series WJ–WK–WR

External links

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