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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dion Jordan
refer to caption
Jordan in the 2019 NFL season
No. 95 – Oakland Raiders
Position:Defensive end
Personal information
Born: (1990-03-05) March 5, 1990 (age 29)
San Francisco, California
Height:6 ft 6 in (1.98 m)
Weight:284 lb (129 kg)
Career information
High school:Chandler (Chandler, Arizona)
College:Oregon
NFL Draft:2013 / Round: 1 / Pick: 3
Career history
Roster status:Active
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics as of Week 16, 2019
Total tackles:91
Sacks:10.5
Forced fumbles:2
Fumble recoveries:0
Pass deflections:5
Player stats at NFL.com

Dion Rory Jordan[1] (born March 5, 1990) is an American football defensive end for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League (NFL). He played college football at Oregon and was drafted by the Miami Dolphins third overall in the 2013 NFL Draft.

Early years

Jordan attended Chandler High School in Chandler, Arizona. He played both tight end and defensive end. He caught 54 passes for 804 yards and 13 touchdowns as a junior. As a senior, he caught 13 passes for 292 yards and three touchdowns in six games before the remainder of his season was curtailed while recovering from a serious off-the-field accident. He was a four-star prospect, and was ranked as the 10th overall tight end in the country by Scout.com.

In track & field, Jordan was one of the state's top performers in the 110 and 300-meter hurdles. He recorded times of 14.24 seconds and 38.27 seconds in those events respectively. At the 2008 5A I Fiesta Region, he won the shot put (14.27 m) and placed fourth in the long jump (6.40 m).[2]

College career

Jordan attended the University of Oregon, where he played for the Oregon Ducks football team from 2008 to 2012. He redshirted in 2008. In 2010, he switched from tight end to defensive end. He finished the season with 33 tackles and two sacks. As a first-year starter in 2011, Jordan was a first-team All-Pac-12 Conference selection after recording 42 tackles, 13 tackles for loss, and 7.5 sacks. He was also named a first-team All-Pac-12 selection in 2012, after recording 44 tackles, 10.5 tackles for loss, and 5 sacks.

On February 23, 2013, Jordan announced that he would undergo surgery to repair a torn labrum. His recovery time required 3 to 4 months.

College statistics

Defense
Year Team GP Tackles For Loss Sacks Int FF
2009 Oregon 6 2 0.0 0.0 0 0
2010 Oregon 13 33 5.5 2.0 0 0
2011 Oregon 14 42 13.0 7.5 0 1
2012 Oregon 12 44 10.5 5.0 0 3
College Totals 45 121 29.0 14.5 0 4

Professional career

Pre-draft measurables
Height Weight Arm length Hand size 40-yard dash 10-yd split 20-yd split 20-ss 3-cone Vert jump Broad
6 ft 6 14 in
(1.99 m)
248 lb
(112 kg)
33 78 in
(0.86 m)
10 in
(0.25 m)
4.54 s 1.61 s 2.59 s 4.35 s 7.02 s 32 12 in
(0.83 m)
10 ft 2 in
(3.10 m)
All values from NFL combine[3][4]

Jordan was selected in the first round, third overall in the 2013 NFL Draft by the Miami Dolphins, who traded up to acquire the pick from the Oakland Raiders.[5] He became the highest selected Oregon Duck since Joey Harrington in 2002.

Miami Dolphins

2013 season

Jordan appeared in all 16 games in his rookie year of 2013 making 26 tackles, two sacks, and two passes defended.

2014 season

On July 3, 2014, Jordan was suspended for the first four games of the 2014 season for violating the NFL's performance-enhancing substance policy. On September 19, 2014, Jordan again violated the drug policy and was given an additional two games to add for the suspension.

2015 season

On April 28, 2015, Jordan was suspended for the entire 2015 season for violating the NFL's performance-enhancing substance policy for a third time. According to sources, Jordan didn't fail a drug test; however, it was determined that one of his test samples was diluted, which is considered a strike.[6]

2016 season

Jordan was conditionally reinstated by the NFL on July 29, 2016, ending what was a 15-month suspension. The conditions stipulated in the reinstatement include he would be able to return to the team for training camp, establishment of treatment resources for Jordan in Miami prior to his being allowed to play in any preseason games, a meeting with the NFL prior to being allowed to play in Week 1 of the regular season, and an in-season meeting with the NFL prior to a full reinstatement.[7] Still, Jordan did not play a down at all during 2016.

On March 31, 2017, Jordan was released by the Dolphins after failing a physical.[8]

Seattle Seahawks

On April 11, 2017, Jordan was signed by the Seattle Seahawks.[9] He was placed on the reserve/non-football injury list to start the season with a knee injury.[10] On November 8, the Seahawks activated Jordan off reserves to the active roster.[11] He played in five games of the season, finishing with 10 tackles and 4 sacks.[12]

On March 14, 2018, the Seahawks placed a first-round restricted free agent tender on Jordan.[13] On June 7, Jordan underwent knee surgery, described as a cleanup.[14]

On May 14, 2019, Jordan was suspended for 10 games due to usage of Adderall. Jordan admitted that he was taking Adderall to alleviate his ADHD, but his therapeutic use exemption expired, and therefore, his appeal was declined.

Oakland Raiders

On November 9, 2019, Jordan signed with the Oakland Raiders.[15] He was immediately placed on the reserve/suspended list to finish out his 10-game suspension.[16] He was reinstated from suspension on November 12.

References

  1. ^ "ESPN Profile". ESPN.com.
  2. ^ "5A I Fiesta Region - Finals (Raw)". Arizona Milesplit. Retrieved April 13, 2018.
  3. ^ http://www.nfl.com/combine/profiles/dion-jordan?id=2539288
  4. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 10, 2013. Retrieved October 19, 2012.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  5. ^ Rosenthal, Gregg (April 26, 2013). "Miami Dolphins shocked trade to No. 3 cost 'half price'". NFL.com.
  6. ^ Nogle, Kevin. "Dion Jordan suspended for 2015 season". The Phinsider. Retrieved April 28, 2015.
  7. ^ Nogle, Kevin. "Dion Jordan reinstated by NFL ending 15-month suspension". The Phinsider. Retrieved July 29, 2016.
  8. ^ Patra, Kevin (March 31, 2016). "Miami Dolphins waive former No. 3 pick Dion Jordan". NFL.com.
  9. ^ Patra, Kevin (April 11, 2017). "Dion Jordan agrees to terms with Seattle Seahawks". NFL.com.
  10. ^ Drovetto, Tony (September 2, 2017). "Seahawks Make Three More Trades, Set 53-Man Roster". Seahawks.com. Archived from the original on October 9, 2017. Retrieved November 8, 2017.
  11. ^ Knoblauch, Austin (November 8, 2017). "Seahawks' Dion Jordan to play for first time since '14". NFL.com.
  12. ^ "Dion Jordan Stats | Pro-Football-Reference.com". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Retrieved May 7, 2018.
  13. ^ "Seahawks place original round tender on DE Dion Jordan". FoxSports.com. March 14, 2018.
  14. ^ "Dion Jordan out 6-8 weeks after knee surgery". NFL. Retrieved June 7, 2018.
  15. ^ "Raiders sign D.J. Swearinger and Dion Jordan; place Joseph on IR and waive Poling". Raiders.com. November 9, 2019.
  16. ^ Florio, Mike (November 9, 2019). "Raiders add Dion Jordan". NBCSports.com. Retrieved November 9, 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 2 January 2020, at 23:53
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