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Diocese of Gyula

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Diocese of Gyula

Episcopia Ortodoxă Română din Gyula
Gyulai Román Ortodox Püspökség
Gyulai ortodox székesegyház.jpg
The Romanian Orthodox Cathedral Saint Nicholas in Gyula
Location
CountryHungary
TerritorySoutheastern Hungary
HeadquartersGyula
Statistics
Members5,204[1]
Information
DenominationRomanian Orthodox
RiteByzantine Rite
Established1999
Current leadership
BishopSiluan Mănuilă

The Diocese of Gyula (Hungarian: Gyulai Román Ortodox Püspökség, Romanian: Episcopia Ortodoxă Română din Gyula) is the Romanian Orthodox diocese of the Romanians in Hungary.

History

The diocese was established in 1999 for the Romanian minority of Hungary, forming part of the Metropolis of Banat.[2] Gyula, a Hungarian town near the Hungary–Romania border, was chosen as the administrative center. The first bishop, Sofronie Drincec, served from 21 February 1999 to 25 February 2007, later serving in the Diocese of Oradea in Romania. The second and current bishop is Siluan Mănuilă, in charge since 8 July 2007.[3] The diocese was withdrawn from the Metropolis of Banat in 2009 to be directly subordinate to the Patriarch of All Romania.[2] In 2010, the diocese had 19 parishes and two monasteries in which 15 priests worked.[4]

References

  1. ^ "Hungarian census 2011 – final data and methodology" (PDF) (in Hungarian). Hungarian Central Statistical Office.
  2. ^ a b "Istoric al vieţii religioase din Banat" (in Romanian). Metropolis of Banat. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  3. ^ Ţăbârnă, Cezar (15 November 2008). "Istoria creştinismului (MCXXIV): Biserica Ortodoxă din Ungaria" (in Romanian). Ziarul Lumina. Retrieved 28 October 2019.
  4. ^ Mudrov, Sergey (2 April 2010). "Православная Европа. Статья 7 Венгрия: радость миссионерских приходов и плач покинутых церквей. Часть 3" (in Russian). Православие.Ru. Retrieved 28 November 2019.


This page was last edited on 22 February 2020, at 14:24
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