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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Dick Drago
Dick Drago 1977.jpg
Drago in 1977
Pitcher
Born: (1945-06-25) June 25, 1945 (age 73)
Toledo, Ohio
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
April 11, 1969, for the Kansas City Royals
Last MLB appearance
September 30, 1981, for the Seattle Mariners
MLB statistics
Win–loss record108–117
Earned run average3.62
Strikeouts987
Teams

Richard Anthony "Dick" Drago (born June 25, 1945) is a former American League relief pitcher in Major League Baseball who played for the Kansas City Royals (1969-1973), Boston Red Sox (1974-1975, 1978-1980), California Angels (1976-1977), Baltimore Orioles (1977) and Seattle Mariners (1981). He batted and threw right-handed.

In a 13-season career, Drago posted a 108-117 record with a 3.75 ERA and 58 saves in 519 appearances (189 as a starter).

Drago played high school ball for Woodward High School in Toledo, Ohio, graduating in 1963. He was originally signed by the Detroit Tigers in the 1964 amateur draft, but was selected by the Kansas City Royals during the 1968 expansion draft. He started his Major League career with the Royals in 1969, becoming the ace of their pitching staff in 1971, after going 17-11 with a 2.98 ERA, and ending fifth in the AL Cy Young Award vote behind Vida Blue, Mickey Lolich, Wilbur Wood and Dave McNally. Finishing with a 3.01 ERA in 1972, Drago went 12-17, but declined with 12-14 and 4.23 in 1973. Drago's success was somewhat remarkable, given the fact that he consistently posted relatively low strikeout numbers. As a Royal, Drago was especially prolific in terms of finishing games, and with 53 complete games, he ranks fifth in Kansas City history.

Drago also pitched for the Angels and Orioles in part of two seasons, and returned to Boston for three solid years, saving 13 games with a 10-6 record in 1979. He ended his major league career with Seattle in 1981.

On July 20, 1976, Drago gave up the last of Hank Aaron's then-major league record 755 career home runs.[1]

See also

References

External links

This page was last edited on 10 June 2019, at 01:08
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