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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Detroit Lions
Current season
Established July 12, 1930; 91 years ago (July 12, 1930)[1]
First season: 1930
Play in Ford Field
Detroit, Michigan
Headquartered in Allen Park, Michigan
LogoWordmark
League/conference affiliations

National Football League (1930–present)

Current uniform
Team colorsHonolulu blue, silver[2][3][4]
   
Fight songGridiron Heroes
MascotRoary the Lion
Personnel
Owner(s)Sheila Ford Hamp[5]
ChairmanSheila Ford Hamp
PresidentRod Wood
Head coachDan Campbell
General managerBrad Holmes
Team history
Championships
League championships (4)
Conference championships (4)
Division championships (4)
Playoff appearances (21)
Home fields

The Detroit Lions are a professional American football team based in Detroit. The Lions compete in the National Football League (NFL) as a member of the National Football Conference (NFC) North division. The team plays its home games at Ford Field in Downtown Detroit.

The franchise was founded in Portsmouth, Ohio as the Portsmouth Spartans and joined the NFL on July 12, 1930.[1] Amid financial struggles, the team was relocated to Detroit in 1934.[6] The team was also renamed the Lions in reference to the city's Major League Baseball (MLB) franchise, the Tigers.

The Lions won four NFL Championship Games between 1935 and 1957, all prior to the Super Bowl era. Since their 1957 championship, the team has won only a single playoff game in 1992 and never advanced beyond the NFC Championship Game. They are the oldest NFL team to not appear in the Super Bowl, as well as the only franchise operational for the entirety of the Super Bowl era and the only NFC team not to appear.[7][8][9]

Franchise history

Logos and uniforms

Lions' logo (1961–1969)
Lions' logo (1961–1969)

Aside from a brief change to scarlet and black from 1948 to 1950 instituted by then head coach Bo McMillin, which was influenced by his years as coach at Indiana, the Lions uniforms have basically remained the same since they moved to Detroit in 1934–silver helmets, silver pants, and either blue or white jerseys.[10][11]

Billy Sims (#20) rushing the ball against the Los Angeles Rams on September 7, 1980
Billy Sims (#20) rushing the ball against the Los Angeles Rams on September 7, 1980

Glenn Presnell, the then last surviving member of the 1934 Lions, recalled that after the Portsmouth Spartans relocated to Detroit, team owner George A. Richards asked him and his wife to pick the Lions' colors from combinations that included red and white, orange and black, and blue and silver. The Presnells liked blue and silver the best, so Richards selected it. The blue used by the Lions is officially known as "Honolulu blue", which is inspired by the color of the waves off the coast of Hawaii.[11][12]

There have been minor changes to the uniform design throughout the years, such as changing the silver stripe patterns on the jersey sleeves, and changing the colors of the jersey numbers. "TV numbers", which are auxiliary uniform numbers to help TV broadcasters identify players from the line of scrimmage, were added to the jersey sleeves in 1956.[11] White trim was added to the logo in 1970, with outlines (white on the blue jersey, silver on the white jersey) added to the numbers in 1972; the color arrangement on the numbers on the blue jerseys was reversed in 1982.[10] The silver facemasks became blue in 1984. In 1998, the team wore blue pants with their white jerseys along with grey socks but dropped that combination after the season.[10][13] In 1999, the "TV numbers" on the sleeves were moved to the shoulders.[14]

In 1994, every NFL team wore throwback jerseys, and the Lions' were similar to the jerseys used during their 1935 championship season. The helmets and pants were solid silver, the jerseys Honolulu blue with silver numbers and the jersey did not have "TV numbers" on the sleeves. The team wore solid blue socks and black cleats. The helmets also did not have a logo, as helmets were simple leather back then.[10] The Lions also wore 1950s-style jerseys during their traditional Thanksgiving Day games from 2001 to 2004 as the NFL encouraged teams to wear throwback jerseys on Thanksgiving Day.[15][16][17][18][19]

In 2003, the team added black trim to their logo and jerseys. The face masks on the helmet changed from blue to black with the introduction of the new color. In 2005, the team introduced an alternate black jersey.[10][20]

For 2008, the team dropped the black jersey in favor of a throwback uniform to commemorate the franchise's 75th anniversary. The throwback uniform became the team's permanent alternate jersey in 2009, replacing the former black alternate.[21] The Lions officially unveiled a new logo and uniforms on April 20, 2009. The logo was given a flowing mane and fangs, while the typeface featured a modern font.[22]

On February 1, 2017, the Lions announced a new typeface, logo, and the complete removal of the color black from the team identity. While the previous logo was retained, the border was changed from black to silver.[2][20] The Lions then unveiled the new uniforms on April 13, 2017, which include blue pants for the first time since 1998; the facemasks also became chrome.[23][24] The Lions also added the initials "WCF" to the left sleeve as a permanent tribute to William Clay Ford, who owned the team from 1963 until his death in 2014. The sleeve addition replaces the black "WCF" patch on the left breast that was added after Ford's death.[25]

Thanksgiving Day tradition

The Lions, seen here during the 2007 Thanksgiving game against their division rival Green Bay Packers, have played on Thanksgiving since 1934.
The Lions, seen here during the 2007 Thanksgiving game against their division rival Green Bay Packers, have played on Thanksgiving since 1934.

In 1934, then team owner George A. Richards, who also was the owner a major radio affiliate of the NBC Blue Network, WJR in Detroit, the forerunner to today's ABC, negotiated an agreement with NBC to carry his Thanksgiving games live across all of the network's stations.[26] Since then, the tradition of the Lions playing on Thanksgiving has continued uninterrupted.[27]

Home attendance

Home attendance at Ford Field
Year Total Attendance
2006 487,116
2007 490,436
2008 435,979
2009 395,162
2010 450,286
2011 509,940
2012 510,158
2013 510,369
2014 504,198
2015 490,782
2016 486,342
2017 513,100
2018 502,361
2019 490,737
2020 0 1
Source:[28]

Note:

Players of note

Current roster

Detroit Lions roster
Quarterbacks

Running backs

Wide receivers

Tight ends

Offensive linemen

Defensive linemen

Linebackers

Defensive backs

Special teams

Reserve lists


Rookies in italics

Roster updated July 27, 2021

88 active, 3 inactive

AFC rostersNFC rosters

Retired numbers

Detroit Lions retired numbers
No. Player Position Tenure Retired
7 Dutch Clark QB 1934–1938 October 15, 1939[1][31][32]
20 Lem Barney CB 1967–1977 November 25, 2004[33]
20 Billy Sims RB 1980–1984 November 25, 2004[33]
20 Barry Sanders RB 1989–1998 November 25, 2004[33]
22 Bobby Layne QB, K 1950–1958 [1]
37 Doak Walker HB, K, P 1950–1955 December 11, 1955[1][34][35]
56 Joe Schmidt 1 LB 1953–1965 [1]
85 Chuck Hughes 2 WR 1970–1971 [1]

Notes:

  • 1 The #56 was unretired with Schmidt's blessing when the Lions acquired linebacker Pat Swilling from the New Orleans Saints. No player has worn it since Swilling left.[36]
  • 2 Posthumous. Hughes died of a heart attack during a game on October 24, 1971, and his #85 was withdrawn from circulation.[1][37][38][39] Over the years, however, the number would return to circulation.[40]

Special cases:

  • The Lions retired #93 for the 2009 season after Corey Smith disappeared, presumed dead, when a boat he was fishing in with friends capsized off the Florida coast.[41] The Lions also wore 93 decals on their helmets that season.[42] The number was assigned to Kyle Vanden Bosch in 2010.[43]

Pro Football Hall of Famers

Detroit Lions Hall of Famers
Players
No. Name Positions Seasons Inducted No. Name Positions Seasons Inducted
20 Lem Barney DB 1967–1977 1992[44] 28 Yale Lary DB, P 1952–1953
1956–1964
1979[45]
24 Jack Christiansen DB 1951–1958 1970[46] 22 Bobby Layne QB 1950–1958 1967[47]
7 Dutch Clark QB
Coach
1934–1938
1937–1938
1963[48] 44 Dick LeBeau DB 1959–1972 2010[49]
76 Lou Creekmur G/T 1950–1959 1996[50] 30 Ollie Matson RB 1963 1972[51]
77 Curley Culp DT 1980–1981 2013[52] 39 Hugh McElhenny HB 1964 1970[53]
35 Bill Dudley HB 1947–1949 1966[54] 20 Barry Sanders RB 1989–1998 2004[55]
72 Frank Gatski C 1957 1985[56] 88 Charlie Sanders TE 1968–1977 2007[57]
81 Calvin Johnson WR 2007–2015 2021[58] 56 Joe Schmidt LB
Coach
1953–1965
1967–1972
1973[59]
35 John Henry Johnson FB 1957–1959 1987[60] 63 Dick Stanfel OG 1952–1955 2016[61]
71 Alex Karras DT 1958–1970 2020[62] 37 Doak Walker HB 1950–1955 1986[63]
81 Dick "Night Train" Lane CB 1960–1965 1974[64] 50 Alex Wojciechowicz C, LB 1938–1946 1968[65]

Pride of the Lions

In 2009, the Pride of the Lions was established. The Pride of the Lions is the ring of honor for the franchise's greatest players.[66]

Elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame
Pride of the Lions
No. Player Position Tenure
20 Lem Barney CB 1967–1977
76 Roger Brown DT 1960–1966
24 Jack Christiansen DB 1951–1958
7 Dutch Clark QB 1934–1938
76 Lou Creekmur G/T 1950–1959
4 Jason Hanson K 1992–2012
71 Alex Karras DT 1958–1970
81 Dick "Night Train" Lane CB 1960–1965
28 Yale Lary DB, P 1952–1953
1956–1964
22 Bobby Layne QB 1950–1958
44 Dick LeBeau DB 1959–1972
84 Herman Moore WR 1991–2001
20 Barry Sanders RB 1989–1998
88 Charlie Sanders TE 1968–1977
56 Joe Schmidt LB 1953–1965
63 Dick Stanfel OG 1952–1955
37 Doak Walker HB 1950–1955
50 Alex Wojciechowicz C, LB 1938–1946

75th Season All-Time Team

On November 9, 2008, the Lions honored the 75th Season All-Time Team during halftime against the Jacksonville Jaguars.[67][68] The team was chosen via an online fan poll and selection committee.[67] Bold indicates those elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

75th Season All-Time Team
No. Player Position Tenure
6 Jim Arnold P 1986–1993
60 Al Baker DE 1978–1982
20 Lem Barney CB 1967–1977
36 Bennie Blades DB 1988–1996
75 Lomas Brown T 1985–1995
76 Roger Brown DT 1960–1966
24 Jack Christiansen DB 1951–1958
7 Dutch Clark QB 1934–1938
89 Gail Cogdill WR 1960–1968
76 Lou Creekmur G/T 1950–1959
25 Jim David DB 1952–1959
44 Don Doll DB 1949–1952
78 Doug English DT 1975–1985
54 Ed Flanagan C 1965–1974
53 Kevin Glover C 1985–1997
75 John Gordy OG 1957–1967
23 Mel Gray KR/PR 1989–1994
4 Jason Hanson 1 K 1992–2012
71 Alex Karras DT 1958–1970
81 Dick "Night Train" Lane CB 1960–1965
28 Yale Lary DB, P 1952–1953
1956–1964
22 Bobby Layne QB 1950–1958
44 Dick LeBeau DB 1959–1972
84 Herman Moore WR 1991–2001
3 Eddie Murray K 1980–1991
91 Robert Porcher DE 1992–2004
20 Barry Sanders RB 1989–1998
88 Charlie Sanders TE 1968–1977
30 Cory Schlesinger FB 1995–2006
56 Joe Schmidt LB 1953–1965
66 Harley Sewell OG 1953–1962
20 Billy Sims RB 1980–1984
54 Chris Spielman LB 1988–1995
37 Doak Walker HB 1950–1955
55 Wayne Walker LB 1958–1972
50 Alex Wojciechowicz C, LB 1938–1946

Note:

  • 1 Hanson was active at the time of the selection.[68]

Lions All-Time Team

On September 29, 2019, the Lions honored their All-Time Team in celebration of the NFL's centennial during halftime against the Kansas City Chiefs. The team was chosen via fan voting, contributions from the Detroit Lions Legends Community, team executives, and select members of the media.[69] Bold indicates those elected to the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Lions All-Time Team
No. Player Position Tenure
60 Al Baker DE 1978–1982
20 Lem Barney CB 1967–1977
36 Bennie Blades DB 1988–1996
75 Lomas Brown T 1985–1995
76 Roger Brown DT 1960–1966
24 Jack Christiansen DB 1951–1958
7 Dutch Clark QB 1934–1938
89 Gail Cogdill WR 1960–1968
76 Lou Creekmur G/T 1950–1959
25 Jim David DB 1952–1959
44 Don Doll DB 1949–1952
20 Ox Emerson G, C, LB 1934–1937
78 Doug English DT 1975–1985
54 Ed Flanagan C 1965–1974
53 Kevin Glover C 1985–1997
23 Mel Gray KR/PR 1989–1994
4 Jason Hanson K 1992–2012
81 Calvin Johnson WR 2007–2015
71 Alex Karras DT 1958–1970
81 Dick "Night Train" Lane CB 1960–1965
28 Yale Lary DB, P 1952–1953
1956–1964
22 Bobby Layne QB 1950–1958
44 Dick LeBeau DB 1959–1972
53 Mike Lucci LB 1965–1973
84 Herman Moore WR 1991–2001
48 Don Muhlbach LS 2004–present
33 Nick Pietrosante FB 1959–1965
91 Robert Porcher DE 1992–2004
20 Barry Sanders RB 1989–1998
88 Charlie Sanders TE 1968–1977
30 Cory Schlesinger FB 1995–2006
56 Joe Schmidt LB 1953–1965
66 Harley Sewell OG 1953–1962
20 Billy Sims RB 1980–1984
54 Chris Spielman LB 1988–1995
9 Matthew Stafford QB 2009–2021
63 Dick Stanfel OG 1952–1955
37 Doak Walker HB 1950–1955
50 Alex Wojciechowicz C, LB 1938–1946

Michigan Sports Hall of Fame

Staff

Current staff

Detroit Lions staff
Front office
  • Owner – Sheila Ford Hamp
  • Vice chairpeople – William Clay Ford Jr., Martha Ford Morse and Elizabeth Ford Kontulis
  • Team president – Rod Wood
  • Special Assistant to Chairman and President & CEO – Chris Spielman
  • Executive vice president/general manager – Brad Holmes
  • Assistant general manager – Ray Agnew
  • Senior vice president of football & business administration – Mike Disner
  • Vice president of player personnel – Vacant
  • Director of player personnel – Lance Newmark
  • Director of pro scouting – Rob Lohman
  • Senior personnel executive – John Dorsey
Head coaches
Offensive coaches
 
Defensive coaches
Special teams coaches
  • Special teams coordinator – Dave Fipp
  • Assistant special teams – Jett Modkins
Strength and conditioning
  • Director of sports performance – Mike Clark
  • Head strength & conditioning – Josh Schuler
  • Assistant strength & conditioning – Morris Henry

Coaching staff
Management
More NFL staffs

AFC East
BUF
MIA
NE
NYJ
North
BAL
CIN
CLE
PIT
South
HOU
IND
JAX
TEN
West
DEN
KC
LV
LAC
NFC East
DAL
NYG
PHI
WAS
North
CHI
DET
GB
MIN
South
ATL
CAR
NO
TB
West
ARI
LAR
SF
SEA

Head coaches

Dan Campbell (pictured in 2011), is the current head coach of the Detroit Lions
Dan Campbell (pictured in 2011), is the current head coach of the Detroit Lions

The Lions have had 30 head coaches throughout their franchise history. Their first head coach was Hal Griffin, who compiled a 5-6-3 (.464) overall record with the team of 1930. Wayne Fontes was the longest-tenured head coach in Lions history, serving from 1988 to 1996.[70] The current head coach of the Lions is Dan Campbell, who was hired on January 20, 2021.

Offensive coordinators

Name Tenure
Dave Levy 1994
Tom Moore 1994–1996
Sylvester Croom 1997–2000
Gary Moeller 2000
Maurice Carthon 2001–2002
Sherman Lewis 2003–2004
Ted Tollner 2005
Mike Martz 2006–2007
Jim Colletto 2008
Scott Linehan 2009–2013
Joe Lombardi 2014–2015
Jim Bob Cooter 2015–2018
Darrell Bevell 2019–2020
Anthony Lynn 2021–present

Defensive coordinators

Name Tenure
Maxie Baughan 1980–1982
Ed Beard 1983–1984
Wayne Fontes 1985–1988
Woody Widenhofer 1989–1992
Hank Bullough 1993
Herb Paterra 1994–1995
Jim Eddy 1996
Larry Peccatiello 1997–2000
Vince Tobin 2001
Kurt Schottenheimer 2002–2003
Dick Jauron 2004–2005
Donnie Henderson 2006
Joe Barry 2007–2008
Gunther Cunningham 2009–2013
Teryl Austin 2014–2017
Paul Pasqualoni 2018–2019
Cory Undlin 2020
Aaron Glenn 2021–present

Rivalries

The Lions have had several division rivals in their existence. Their oldest rivals are the Chicago Bears and the Green Bay Packers, whom they have faced since 1930.[71][72] The Minnesota Vikings have been in a division with Detroit ever since their inaugural season in 1961.[73][74] Another notable longtime division opponent was the Tampa Bay Buccaneers (25 seasons from 1977 to 2001).[75]

The Lions also have a preseason rivalry with the Cleveland Browns, dubbed the Great Lakes Classic.[76] The two teams have been playing for The Barge Trophy since 2002.[77] The Lions and Browns had a solid rivalry in the 1950s, when they met four times for the NFL championship (Detroit won three of the matchups); they have met much less frequently during the regular season since the 1970 AFL–NFL merger due to the Browns' move to the AFC.[78]

Radio and television

Map of radio affiliates
Map of radio affiliates

Radio

The Lions' flagship radio station is WJR 760 AM.[79] Dan Miller does play-by-play and Lomas Brown does color commentary.[80]

In 2015, the team announced that they were moving from WXYT-FM to WJR for the 2016 NFL season, ending a 20-year relationship with CBS Radio.[81] The decision to part with WXYT was reportedly instigated by a demand by the team for the station to fire on-air personality Mike Valenti, who has had a history of making critical comments about the Lions during his drivetime show, as a condition of any future renewal. A CBS Radio spokesperson stated that their refusal was meant to maintain the station's integrity.[81][82]

The Lions' flagship station will return to WXYT-FM starting with the 2021 season.[83]

TV

Preseason

In 2015, WJBK took over from WXYZ-TV as the flagship station for Lions preseason games.[84] In 2019, the announcers were Fred McLeod with play-by-play, Chris Spielman with color commentary, and Tori Petry with sideline reports.[85] Games are produced by Fox Sports Detroit.[86]

Regular season

Regular season games are broadcast regionally on Fox, except when the Lions play an AFC team in Detroit, in which case the game airs regionally on CBS; however, since 2014, with the institution of the NFL's "cross flex" broadcast rules, any Lions game slated to air on Fox can be moved to CBS.[87][88] The Thanksgiving Day game in Detroit is always televised nationally.[27] In 2011, the Lions became the last NFC team to play on NBC's Sunday Night Football since the network began airing Sunday night games in 2006.[89]

Blackouts

The Lions' winless performance in 2008 and 2–14 season in 2009, coupled with the effects of the Great Recession in Michigan, led to several local broadcast blackouts, as local fans did not purchase enough tickets by the 72-hour blackout deadline. The first blackout in the then seven-year history of Ford Field was on October 26, 2008 against the Washington Redskins. The previous 50 regular season home games had been sellouts.[90] The second home game of the 2009 season in which the Lions broke the losing streak, also against the Redskins, was blacked out locally, as well as the comeback victory over the Cleveland Browns.[91][92][93] The Lions had only one blackout in 2010, yet another Redskins game, which the Lions won 37–25.[94] However, in 2015, the NFL suspended its blackout policies, meaning that all Lions games will be shown on local TV, regardless of tickets sold.[95]

Games were also often blacked out at the Lions' previous home, the 80,000-seat Pontiac Silverdome, despite winning seasons and the success and popularity of star players such as Barry Sanders.[96][97]

Lions cheerleaders

On June 13, 2016, the Lions announced their decision to add official cheerleaders to the organization.[98] The team also announced that Rebecca Girard-Smoker, formerly the director of the Detroit Pistons dance team, would be the coach of the cheerleading squad. It marked the first time in over 40 years the team had an official cheerleading squad. The cheerleading squad is a part of the entertainment during football games, and active at community events.[99]

See also

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "Detroit Lions Team Facts". ProFootballHOF.com. NFL Enterprises. Archived from the original on April 12, 2019. Retrieved October 2, 2017.
  2. ^ a b "Detroit Lions statement regarding rebranding". DetroitLions.com. NFL Enterprises. February 1, 2017. Archived from the original on August 14, 2018. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  3. ^ "Lions Visual Identity" (PDF). 2020 Detroit Lions Media Guide. NFL Enterprises. August 17, 2020. Archived (PDF) from the original on December 6, 2020. Retrieved November 26, 2020. On Feb. 1, 2017 the Lions once again updated the team's logo and typeface as part of a rebranding initiative that also included four new uniform options. The updated logo and typeface includes the removal of black from the brand identity, emphasizing the team's class color combination of Honolulu blue and silver that has been synonymous with the Detroit Lions since 1934.
  4. ^ "Detroit Lions Team Capsule". 2020 Official National Football League Record and Fact Book. NFL Enterprises. August 17, 2020. Archived from the original on August 19, 2020. Retrieved October 18, 2020.
  5. ^ "Martha Firestone Ford to step down as principal owner of Detroit Lions". DetroitLions.com. NFL Enterprises. June 23, 2020. Archived from the original on June 24, 2020. Retrieved June 25, 2020.
  6. ^ Barnett, C. Robert (1980). "THE PORTSMOUTH SPARTANS" (PDF). Professional Football Researchers Association. Archived (PDF) from the original on September 21, 2020. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  7. ^ Caldwell, Dave (February 1, 2019). "Meet The NFL Team That Might Never Make It To A Super Bowl". Forbes. Archived from the original on October 19, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  8. ^ Carroll, Charlotte (February 3, 2019). "What Teams Have Never Won the Super Bowl?". SI.com. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  9. ^ Barringer, Daisy (January 2, 2019). "21 Football Facts to Fake Your Super Bowl Street Cred". Eventbrite. Archived from the original on August 31, 2018. Retrieved January 10, 2019.
  10. ^ a b c d e "TBT: Lions uniforms through the years". DetroitLions.com. NFL Enterprises. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  11. ^ a b c Dow, Bill (April 22, 2009). "The Evolution of the Detroit Lions' Uniforms". Vintage Detroit. Archived from the original on June 27, 2020. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  12. ^ NFL Throwback (August 20, 2020). "How EVERY Team Got Their Colors!". YouTube. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  13. ^ Lukas, Paul (April 13, 2017). "The Detroit Lions' uniforms for 2017 will be evolution of the current look". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  14. ^ "Detroit Lions". The Gridiron Uniform Database. Archived from the original on February 16, 2020. Retrieved March 18, 2020.
  15. ^ "Little consolation: Lions rally, but still fall to 0-10". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 22, 2001. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  16. ^ "Lions give too charitably to Patriots". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 28, 2002. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  17. ^ "Packers' playoff hopes hurt". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 27, 2003. Archived from the original on March 8, 2021. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  18. ^ "Manning throws 6 TDs in less than three quarters". ESPN.com. Associated Press. November 25, 2004. Archived from the original on October 2, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  19. ^ Illuminati, Chris (November 23, 2016). "NFL Thanksgiving Throwback Jerseys". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  20. ^ a b Birkett, Dave (February 1, 2017). "Detroit Lions tweak logo and font, will alter uniforms, too". Detroit Free Pres. Archived from the original on October 18, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  21. ^ Kowalski, Tom (February 9, 2009). "Tom Lewand: Lions' black uniforms discarded". The Grand Rapids Press. Archived from the original on February 10, 2009. Retrieved April 25, 2016.
  22. ^ "Lions Unveil New Comprehensive Brand; Team modifies team logo and uniforms and introduces new brand". DetroitLions.com. NFL Enterprises, LLC. April 20, 2009. Archived from the original on November 14, 2009. Retrieved June 30, 2019.
  23. ^ Hanzus, Dan (April 13, 2017). "Lions unveil new uniforms, bring back throwbacks". NFL.com. NFL Enterprises. Archived from the original on July 14, 2020. Retrieved July 14, 2020.
  24. ^ "Lions unveil new uniforms". DetroitLions.com (Press release). NFL Enterprises. April 13, 2017. Archived from the original on August 14, 2018. Retrieved August 14, 2018.
  25. ^ Rapaport, Daniel (September 9, 2017). "Why do the Lions have "WCF"' on their jerseys?". SI.com. Archived from the original on August 14, 2018. Retrieved December 28, 2018.
  26. ^ Jaworowski, Matt (November 24, 2016). "Timeline: How football became a Thanksgiving tradition". WIVB-TV. Archived from the original on September 26, 2020. Retrieved November 24, 2016.
  27. ^ a b Beach, Jerry (November 22, 2018). "Why Do The Lions Always Play On Thanksgiving Day?". Forbes. Archived from the original on October 20, 2019. Retrieved October 23, 2019.
  28. ^ "NFL Attendance". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on July 19, 2017. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
  29. ^ Birkett, Dave (October 29, 2020). "Detroit Lions to host 500 fans at Ford Field vs. Indianapolis Colts". Detroit Free Press. Archived from the original on October 29, 2020. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  30. ^ "Where each of the 32 NFL teams stands on allowing fans into stadiums". ESPN.com. December 14, 2020. Archived from the original on January 2, 2021. Retrieved May 10, 2021.
  31. ^ Willis, Chris (2012). Dutch Clark: The Life of an NFL Legend and the Birth of the Detroit Lions. The Scarecrow Press, Inc. p. 277. ISBN 978-0810885202. Retrieved January 20, 2020.
  32. ^ "Cleveland Rams at Detroit Lions - October 15th, 1939". Pro-Football-Reference.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2019. Retrieved January 20, 2020.
  33. ^ a b c Hackenberg, Dave (November 26, 2004). "Lions have 20-20-20 vision". Toledo Blade. Archived from the original on October 19, 2019. Retrieved October 18, 2019.
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Bibliography

External links

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