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Demographics of Aruba

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This article is about the demographic features of the population of Aruba, including population density, ethnicity, education level, health of the populace, economic status, religious affiliations and other aspects of the population.

Census population and average annual growth rate
YearPop.±% p.a.
1930 15,659—    
1960 53,199+4.16%
1972 57,908+0.71%
1981 60,312+0.45%
1991 66,687+1.01%
2000 90,506+3.45%
2010 101,484+1.15%
Source:[1]

Having poor soil and aridity, Aruba was detached from plantation economics and the slave trade. In 1515, the Spanish transported the entire population to Hispaniola to work in the copper mines; most were allowed to return when the mines were tapped out. The Dutch, who took control a century later, left the Arawaks to graze livestock, using the island as a source of meat for other Dutch possessions in the Caribbean. The Arawak heritage is stronger on Aruba than on most Caribbean islands.

The population is estimated to be 75% mixed European/Amerindian/African, 15% Black and 10% other ethnicities. Although no full-blooded Aboriginals remain, the features of half of the islanders clearly indicate their genetic Arawak heritage. The population is descended from Caquetio Indians, Afro-Caribbeans, Dutch, Spanish, Italians and to a lesser extent of Indo-Caribbeans, Portuguese, English, French, and Philippine diaspora. Recently, there has been substantial immigration to the island from neighboring American and Caribbean nations, possibly attracted by the higher paid jobs. In 2007, new immigration laws were introduced to help control the growth of the population by restricting foreign workers to a maximum of three years residency on the island. Demographically, Aruba has felt the impact of its proximity to Venezuela. Many of Aruba's families are descended from Venezuelan immigrants. There is a seasonal increase of Venezuelans living in second homes. As Aruba has a little proximity to Colombia, Colombian residents and their children are found here. Descendants of Indian and Javanese contract workers (Slaves) also live in Aruba.

The two official languages are the Dutch language and the predominant, national language Papiamento, which is classified as a creole language. This creole language is formed primarily from 16th century Portuguese, and several other languages. Spanish and English are also spoken. Islanders can often speak four or more languages.

Many people in the Aruba island culture are multilingual meaning they can speak more than two or three languages. Languages in this culture are known to be mainly Spanish and English, but also include languages such as Dutch, Portuguese and a local language known as Papiamentu. The Leeward islands also known as the (ABC) islands are Aruba, Bonaire, Curaçao. All three islands include the languages listed above.[2]

Children in Aruba are known to start school by the age of four and are commonly known to be multilingual by this time. Although main languages for Aruba are Papiamentu and Dutch, English is taught through education when reaching the sixth grade. One issue that has been known to the ABC islands for a very long period of time now is that of people speaking too many languages. Speaking too many languages has had a major effect on the way students learn, students being taught in different languages not only confuses some but also makes it difficult to decide which language is best for them.[2]

Roman Catholicism is the dominant religion, practiced by about 75% of the population. Various Protestant denominations are also present on the island.[3]

Population

Population of Aruba in thousands, 1961-2003
Population of Aruba in thousands, 1961-2003

The estimated population of 2018 is 105,845 (the 2019 revision of the World Population Prospects[4][5]).

The population of the island of Aruba is well over 110,000 people. The Aruba culture is one of a mixed ancestry, Caquetio Indian, African, and European among many more all reside within the island of Aruba. Aruba is located within the kingdom of the Netherlands and with the diversity in immigration and is one of the top ten countries with the highest immigration rate.[6] The People of Aruba also an overall very strong national identity, With their healthy economy, strong education system as well as having the highest standards of living within the Caribbean, all of these aspects have helped shape and mold the people of Aruba as well as the culture that surrounds them. The people as a whole are also generally deemed very warm and kind-hearted to not only each other but to guests and visitors as well, some people even claiming that it's the people who bring them back every year.[7]

Between 1985 and 1987 the country of Aruba lost many citizens due to emigration. In 1990, Aruba gained more than 20,000 residents which made it one of the fastest growing countries in the world. The oil industry in the country was growing rapidly along with the amount of tourism; this led the population growth rate to be more than 5.3 percent at all times. Aruba as one, became a much more stable country, as it once was.[8]

Vital statistics

[9][10][11]

Average population (x 1000) Live births Deaths Natural change Crude birth rate (per 1000) Crude death rate (per 1000) Natural change (per 1000) TFR
1952 39 1 958 249 1 709 50.2 6.4 43.9
1953 40 2 002 172 1 830 49.9 4.3 45.6
1954 42 2 015 205 1 810 48.2 4.9 43.3
1955 44 1 916 236 1 680 43.8 5.4 38.4
1956 46 1 918 228 1 690 41.8 5.0 36.8
1957 48 2 017 233 1 784 41.8 4.8 37.0
1958 51 1 968 232 1 736 39.0 4.6 34.4
1959 53 1 836 248 1 588 34.9 4.7 30.2
1960 54 1 916 254 1 662 35.3 4.7 30.7
1961 55 1 838 217 1 621 33.2 3.9 29.2
1962 56 1 787 215 1 572 31.8 3.8 28.0
1963 57 1 657 208 1 449 29.2 3.7 25.6
1964 57 1 556 224 1 332 27.3 3.9 23.4
1965 57 1 420 225 1 195 24.8 3.9 20.8
1966 58 1 230 219 1 011 21.3 3.8 17.5
1967 58 1 151 226 925 19.8 3.9 15.9
1968 58 1 143 258 885 19.6 4.4 15.2
1969 59 1 188 318 870 20.2 5.4 14.8
1970 59 1 234 289 945 20.9 4.9 16.0
1971 59 1 232 292 940 20.7 4.9 15.8
1972 60 1 201 275 926 20.1 4.6 15.5
1973 58 1 003 287 716 17.2 4.9 12.3
1974 58 962 298 664 16.5 5.1 11.4
1975 58 968 286 682 16.6 4.9 11.7
1976 58 941 300 641 16.1 5.1 11.0
1977 59 993 320 673 17.0 5.5 11.5
1978 59 1 058 284 774 18.0 4.8 13.2
1979 59 1 065 318 747 18.0 5.4 12.6
1980 60 1 125 288 837 18.8 4.8 14.0
1981 61 1 051 317 734 17.4 5.2 12.1
1982 61 1 036 313 723 16.9 5.1 11.8
1983 62 1 133 339 794 18.2 5.4 12.8
1984 63 1 169 323 846 18.6 5.1 13.4
1985 62 1 109 334 775 18.0 5.4 12.6
1986 60 1 014 377 637 16.9 6.3 10.6
1987 59 992 370 622 16.8 6.3 10.5
1988 59 949 335 614 16.0 5.6 10.3
1989 60 1 141 372 769 18.9 6.2 12.7
1990 63 1 140 419 721 18.2 6.7 11.5
1991 66 1 157 429 728 17.6 6.5 11.0
1992 69 1 292 424 868 18.7 6.1 12.6
1993 74 1 337 402 935 18.1 5.5 12.7
1994 78 1 315 431 884 16.9 5.6 11.4
1995 80 1 419 504 915 17.8 6.3 11.5
1996 83 1 452 469 983 17.5 5.6 11.8
1997 86 1 457 497 960 16.9 5.8 11.1
1998 88 1 315 505 810 14.9 5.7 9.2
1999 90 1 251 561 690 14.0 6.3 7.7
2000 91 1 294 531 763 14.3 5.9 8.4 1.98
2001 91 1 263 435 828 13.8 4.8 9.1 1.95
2002 92 1 228 492 736 13.3 5.3 8.0 1.93
2003 93 1 244 501 743 13.4 5.4 8.0 1.94
2004 95 1 193 502 691 12.5 5.3 7.3 1.89
2005 98 1 263 482 781 12.9 4.9 8.0 1.91
2006 99 1 359 539 820 13.7 5.4 8.2 2.01
2007 100 1 339 533 806 13.4 5.3 8.0 1.99
2008 101 1 319 554 765 13.1 5.5 7.6 1.97
2009 102 1 253 629 624 12.3 6.2 6.1 1.92
2010 102 1 197 619 578 11.8 6.1 5.7 1.80
2011 103 1 092 633 459 10.6 6.2 4.5 1.72
2012 104 1 140 595 545 10.9 5.7 5.2 1.75
2013 104 1 154 560 594 10.9 5.3 5.6 1.77
2014 106 1 376 643 733 12.8 6.0 6.8 1.86
2015 109 1 244 679 565 11.4 6.2 5.2 1.79
2016 110 1 121 781 340 10.2 7.1 2.9
2017 111 1 202 707 495 10.8 6.4 4.4
2018 112 1 028 717 311 9.2 6.4 2.8
2019 1 029 665 364 9.2 5.9 3.3

Structure of the population

[12]

Structure of the population (01.07.2013) (Estimates) :

Age Group Male Female Total %
Total 50 117 55 859 105 976 100
0-4 3 061 3 016 6 077 5,73
5-9 3 619 3 387 7 006 6,61
10-14 3 733 3 711 7 445 7,03
15-19 3 872 3 744 7 616 7,19
20-24 3 145 2 941 6 086 5,74
25-29 2 775 2 994 5 769 5,44
30-34 3 011 3 578 6 589 6,22
35-39 3 249 3 860 7 109 6,71
40-44 3 906 4 551 8 456 7,98
45-49 4 072 4 798 8 871 8,37
50-54 4 275 4 873 9 148 8,63
55-59 3 526 4 176 7 702 7,27
60-64 2 805 3 228 6 033 5,69
65-69 1 942 2 456 4 397 4,15
70-74 1 413 1 735 3 148 2,97
75-79 886 1 368 2 254 2,13
80-84 554 842 1 396 1,32
85-89 195 370 566 0,53
90-94 65 160 225 0,21
95-99 10 55 66 0,06
100+ 4 16 18 0,02
Age group Male Female Total Percent
0-14 10 413 10 114 20 527 19,37
15-64 34 635 38 743 73 378 69,24
65+ 5 069 7 002 12 071 11,39

Ethnic groups

Ethnic groups of Aruba [3]
Ethnic groups percent
Aruban
66%
Colombian
9.1%
Other
6.2%
Dutch
4.3%
Dominican
4.1%
Venezuelan
3.2%
Curaçaoan
2.2%
Haitian
1.5%
Surinamese
1.2%
Peruvian
1.1%
Chinese
1.1%

The population is estimated to be 75% mixed European/Amerindian/African, 15% Black and 10% other ethnicities.

Languages

Languages of Aruba [3]
Languages percent
Papiamento
69.4%
Spanish
13.7%
English
7.1%
Dutch
6.1%
Chinese
1.5%
Other
1.7%
Unspecified
0.4%

Religions

Religions of Aruba [3]
Religions percent
Roman Catholic
75.3%
Other
12%
None
5.5%
Protestant
4.9%
Other Christian
3.4%
Jehovah's Witness
1.7%
Unspecified
0.5%

References

  1. ^ "Better data. Better lives. – Central Bureau of Statistics – Aruba". Cbs.aw. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  2. ^ a b Dijkhoff, Marta; Pereira, Joyce (2010), "Language and education in Aruba, Bonaire and Curaçao", Creoles in Education, John Benjamins Publishing Company, pp. 237–272, doi:10.1075/cll.36.10dij, ISBN 978-90-272-5258-6
  3. ^ a b c d "Central America and Caribbean ::ARUBA". CIA The World Factbook.
  4. ^ ""World Population prospects – Population division"". population.un.org. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  5. ^ ""Overall total population" – World Population Prospects: The 2019 Revision" (xslx). population.un.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  6. ^ Croes, Haime; Hooimeijer, Pieter (2010). "Gender and chain migration: the case of Aruba". Population, Space and Place. 16 (2): 121–134. doi:10.1002/psp.530. ISSN 1544-8452.
  7. ^ "Aruba's People - Population Size, Ethnicity & Other Facts | Aruba.com". www.aruba.com. Retrieved 2020-03-23.
  8. ^ Eelens, Frank. (1994). The population of Aruba : a demographic profile. Netherlands Interdisciplinary Demographic Institute/NIDI. ISBN 90-70990-49-0. OCLC 905474007.
  9. ^ "United Nations Statistics Division - Demographic and Social Statistics". unstats.un.org. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  10. ^ "Central Bureau of Statistics". Unstate.un.org. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  11. ^ "3. Live births, deaths, and infant deaths, latest available year (2002 - 2016" (PDF). Unstats.unorg. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
  12. ^ "United Nations Statistics Division - Demographic and Social Statistics". unstats.un.org. Retrieved 25 August 2017.
This page was last edited on 27 October 2020, at 13:10
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