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Demographics of Alberta

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alberta's population growth, 1901 to 2006
Alberta's population growth, 1901 to 2006

Alberta has experienced a relatively high rate of growth in recent years, due in large part to its economy. Between 2003 and 2004, the province saw high birthrates (on par with some larger provinces such as British Columbia), relatively high immigration, and a high rate of interprovincial migration when compared to other provinces.[1] Approximately 81% of the population live in urban areas and only about 19% live in rural areas. The Calgary–Edmonton Corridor is the most urbanized area in Alberta and is one of Canada's four most urban regions.[2] Many of Alberta's cities and towns have also experienced high rates of growth in recent history. From a population of 73,022 in 1901, Alberta has grown to 3,645,257 in 2011 and in the process has gone from less than 1.5% of Canada's population to 10.9%.[3] As of July 1, 2018, Alberta's population represented 11.6% of Canada's total population of 37,058,856 making it the fourth most populated province in Canada.[4][Notes 1] According to the 2018 third quarter report, Alberta's population increased by 23,096 to 4,330,206, the largest increase since the 2014 economic downturn.[5][6]

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  • ✪ New York City vs London - City Comparison
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Transcription

According to Travel and Leisure magazine, the best city in the world right now you could visit is San Miguel de Allende in Mexico, followed by Charleston in the USA, followed by Chiang Mai in Thailand. These three places, however, don’t even get on the top 20 places to actually live, in this year’s Quality of Living Index, a yearly list compiled by HR firm, Mercer. Apparently, if you want to live the good life, you should move to Vienna, Austria, Zurich, Switzerland, or Auckland, New Zealand. The top twenty list doesn’t include any cities from the UK or the USA, two countries that have arguably been the two heavyweights in the last century regarding power and wealth. These two countries, however, contain cities that attract millions of overseas visitors every year. Today we are going to compare them, in this episode of the Infographics Show, New York City vs London. Don’t forget to subscribe and click the bell button so that you can be part of our Notification Squad. The cities are two of the most visited places in the entire world. In 2016, though, the most visited city in the world by international travelers was Thailand’s capital, Bangkok. 21.47 million people visited Bangkok that year. In second place was London, with 19.88 million visitors, and in third place was Paris with 18.03 million visitors. The most visited U.S. city was New York City, and that was in fifth place with 12.75 million visitors. Dubai was in fourth. In the last five years, Bangkok held the first position three times, and London twice. In our comparison, we might thereby deduce that London is more visitable than New York City. Let’s find out why. First, we will take a look at the two cities’ abridged history. We’ll start with London as it’s the elder. The city of London is old, but nowhere near as old as some cities in the Middle East, China, or other parts of Europe. You’ll know from our show on the British and Roman Empires that Britain was invaded by the Romans in 43 AD. They established the city of Londinium, that at the time was about the size of a small village in England right now. When the Romans left Londinium, it was pretty much a ghost town, and for hundreds of years it remained so. Even the invading Vikings didn’t do much with it, and it wasn’t until the Normans invaded from France and subjugated the country that London became a powerful city. William the Conqueror made London the Norman stronghold, building the famous Tower of London. The Normans would be the last people to this date to successfully invade England. In medieval times London grew in power and wealth, but that also included the spread of poverty, corruption and greed among the upper echelons of society, and bouts of population-denuding plagues. It wasn’t until 1850 that London became the largest city in the world in terms of population. Some sources say it was as early as 1825, though most scholars agree that London was the most populated city until the 1920s. Another city then took over right up until the 60s, and that was the city of New York. Long before New York City had high-rise buildings, it was the stomping ground of Algonquin natives who hunted and fished where people now trade stocks and eat pastrami sandwiches. It wasn’t until 1624 that European settlers would start a community in the city, when families of the Dutch West India Company made a home on Nutten Island. That’s now known as Governors Island and is between Manhattan and Brooklyn. Being Dutch, they called this place New Amsterdam. Some historians say that the Dutch bought the area from the natives for a few trinkets. The peace between the natives and the Euro expansionists didn’t last, and the trouble ended with the a lot more native causalities than Dutch casualties. New Amsterdam soon covered much of what we regard as New York City today, but the imperialistic Brits guided by London prospectors would soon burst the Dutch bubble. On August 26, 1664, four British frigates sailed to New Amsterdam and in a bloodless coup took control and renamed it New York, after the Duke of York, not the city of York in the north of England. At that time, the city had about 1,500 Europeans and 375 Africans, most of whom were slaves. It remained that way for over a hundred years, and even when American independence was on the cards, New York City was a stronghold for British loyalists. In 1783 the British were forced out, and in 1789 it became the first national capital of the U.S. Only in 1790 did the capital become Washington DC. Like London, the growing city had its fair share of growing pains, including great fires, and huge loss of life due to yellow fever and cholera. Nonetheless, by 1850 the population was more than 550,000 and New York City had become a center of the world. So now we come to the present day. The population of London right now is thought to be about 8.7 million. This has spiked lately due to the arrival of ethnic minorities that make up about 44 percent of the city’s population. London covers an area of 607 sq. miles (1,570 sq km), making it the biggest city in Europe. New York City has a population of 8.538 million, and is it a mixed city in terms of ethnicity. About 44 percent of residents are white Caucasian, 27 percent Hispanic, 25 percent black or African American, with a much smaller mix of other ethnicities. The city covers 304 sq miles (789 sq km) and is the biggest city in the USA, though considerably smaller than London. But with almost equal populations, this means New Yorkers have far less space. So what about the standard of living in these cities? They are both pivotal cities regarding the financial sector, though one website claims that London’s financial sector is slightly bigger with 340,000 employees to New York's 322,000. As of March 2017, the Global Financial Centres Index puts London at the center of the world, with New York hot on its heels in the number two spot. New York has more billionaires, with 103 in 2017 according to Forbes, while London only has 72. London is said to have better job growth, though, over the last decade. For the average Joe of us, how is life in these cities? Again, it depends on which source you read. The latest cost of living Index by Expatisan puts New York as the 5th most expensive city to live in the world and London in 12th, with food and housing in New York being more expensive, but clothes and transportation being cheaper. The Guardian reports that after Brexit, London got a lot cheaper, stating that the city has recently arrived at a “new-found bargain-basement status”. In fact, according to the website Numbeo - that compares cost of prices around the world - the cities are fairly equal in terms of eating, going out, shopping, but just a bit more in New York. Renting in London is cheaper than New York if you’re not renting high-end apartments, but actually buying a place is much more expensive in London on average. Travel is more expensive in London, whether you buy your own gas or use public transportation. Gas and electric is also more expensive in London, but Internet is almost half the price of New York on average. Education is more expensive in New York, and it’s thought that inner city London schools are a bit better than inner city New York schools. The average wage in New York is 4,542 dollars a month, while in London it is only 2,952 dollars a month. That might sound bad for Londoners, but they get free health care, lots of paid vacation, and in general better workers’ rights. Money aside, what about the general day to day creature comforts? Well, as London is much bigger, it also has more space. With that you get more parks, and more green spaces. At the same time New York is easier to get around and some people speaking on forums say a bit more fun as it's compact, and unlike London, is more of a 24-hour city. If you are out at night, London may have more crimes in terms of robberies and assaults, but New York has more murders. According to Numbeo, respondents to a survey said they felt similar about safety in London and New York. It seems the difference is bigger crimes are more common in New York, but your chances of finding trouble on the street is more likely in London. We should, however, take this to those that have lived in both cities. According to one American man who did both for many years, he said on a forum thread that both cities were too expensive, even when single. He loved the open sprawling green spaces in London, and at times didn’t like the noisy, claustrophobic streets of New York. He did, however, like the fact that in New York, you could sit down anywhere and find enjoyment, while London was too spread out for him at times. The writer agreed with the sites we cited already on costs of things, also the heavy workload in the U.S. for most people, but did say in terms of meeting new people, socializing, or partying, New York is easier. One more thing he pointed out that we didn’t mention yet was the weather, which is a deal-breaker for some people. New York has colder winters and can have steaming hot summers, whereas London is cool, damp and grey for much of the year, with some warm weeks in summer and only a moderately cold winter compared to New York. We’ll end it there with the weather. Have you lived in or visited either of these two cities? If so, we’d love it if you shared your opinion in the comments! Also, be sure to check out our other video called American Cops vs British Cops! Thanks for watching, and, as always, don’t forget to like, share, and subscribe. See you next time!

Contents

Population history

Year Population [7] Five Year
 % change
Ten Year
 % change
Percentage of
Canadian Pop.
Rank Among
Provinces
1901 73,022 n/a n/a 1.4 9
1911 374,295 n/a 412.6 5.2 7
1921 588,454 n/a 57.2 6.7 5
1931 731,605 n/a 24.3 7.0 4
1941 796,169 n/a 8.8 6.9 5
1951 939,501 n/a 18.0 6.7 4
1956 1,123,116 19.5 n/a n/a 4
1961 1,331,944 18.6 41.8 7.3 4
1969 1,463,203 9.9 30.3 n/a 4
1971 1,627,875 11.3 22.2 7.5 4
1976 1,838,035 12.9 25.6 n/a 4
1981 2,237,724 21.7 37.5 9.2 4
1986 2,365,830 5.7 28.7 9.3 4
1991 2,545,553 7.6 13.8 9.3 4
1996 2,696,826 5.9 14.0 9.3 4
2001 2,974,807 10.3 16.9 9.9 4
2006 3,290,350 10.6 22.0 10.4 4
2011 3,645,257 10.8 22.5 10.9 4
2016 4,067,175 11.6 22.4 11.6 4

Population geography

Alberta's census divisions by population
Alberta's census divisions by population

Census divisions

Census metropolitan areas

As of the 2011 census, Alberta had two census metropolitan areas (CMAs) recognized by Statistics Canada. The following is a list of the recent population history of the Calgary and Edmonton CMAs.

CMA name [8] 2011 [8] 2006 [9] 2001 [10] 1996 [11] Census division
Calgary 1,214,839 1,079,310 951,395 [CMA 1] 821,628 Division No. 6
Edmonton 1,159,869 1,034,945 937,845 862,597 Division No. 11

CMA notes:

  1. ^ In the 2006 census, the 2001 population of the Calgary was adjusted to 951,494 due to a boundary expansion.

Census agglomerations

Census subdivisions

Population growth of Alberta's census subdivisions between 2006 and 2011 censuses
Population growth of Alberta's census subdivisions between 2006 and 2011 censuses

As of the 2006 census, Alberta had 453 census subdivisions (municipalities and municipal equivalents) recognized by Statistics Canada. The following is a list of those census subdivisions with a population of 10,000 or greater.

Population centres

Designated places

Ethnic origins

The ethnicities most commonly reported in the 2011 Census are shown in the table below. The percentages add up to more than 100% because of dual responses (e.g. "Irish-Canadian" generates an entry in both the category "Irish" and the category "Canadian").[17]

Ethnic Group Total Percentage
English 886,760 24.9%
Canadian 776,695 21.8%
German 683,835 19.2%
Scottish 670,950 18.8%
Irish 565,120 15.8%
French 396,230 11.1%
Ukrainian 345,405 9.7%
Dutch (Netherlands) 182,265 5.1%
First Nations 177,140 5.0%
Polish 174,380 4.8%
Chinese 155,965 4.4%
Norwegian 152,645 4.3%
Indian (South Asian) 125,105 3.5%
Filipino 113,210 3.2%
Russian 99,775 2.8%
Swedish 96,890 2.7%
Métis 94,615 2.7%
Italian 88,710 2.5%
British n.i.e. 79,300 2.2%
Welsh 75,870 2.1%

Other Ethnic Groups

In addition to the groups listed above, the next most commonly reported (counting both single and multiple responses) were:

Visible minorities and Aboriginals

Visible minority and Aboriginal population (Canada 2016 Census)
Population group Population % of total population
European 2,786,340 70%
Visible minority group
Source:[18]
South Asian 230,930 5.8%
Chinese 158,200 4%
Black 129,390 3.3%
Filipino 166,195 4.2%
Latin American 55,090 1.4%
Arab 56,700 1.4%
Southeast Asian 43,985 1.1%
West Asian 20,980 0.5%
Korean 21,275 0.5%
Japanese 12,165 0.3%
Visible minority, n.i.e. 9,900 0.2%
Multiple visible minority 28,360 0.7%
Total visible minority population 933,165 23.5%
Aboriginal group
Source:[19]
First Nations 136,585 3.4%
Métis 114,370 2.9%
Inuit 2,500 0.1%
Aboriginal, n.i.e. 2,280 0.1%
Multiple Aboriginal identity 2,905 0.1%
Total Aboriginal population 258,640 6.5%
Total population 3,978,145 100%

Languages

Of the 3,547,680 singular responses to the 2011 census question concerning mother tongue, the languages most commonly reported were:[20]

2011 % 2006 % 2001 %
1. English 2,780,200 78.37% 2,576,670 79.99% 2,379,515 81.84%
2. Chinese 105,470 2.97% 97,275 3.02% 78,205 2.69%
Cantonese 34,985 0.99% 32,485 1.01% 26,255 0.90%
Mandarin 19,325 0.54% 12,135 0.38% 5,580 0.19%
Hakka 325 0.01% 425 0.01% 570 0.02%
Fukien 445 0.01% 385 0.01% N N
Taiwanese 340 0.01% 330 0.01% N N
3. German 80,905 2.28% 84,505 2.62% 78,040 2.68%
4. French 68,545 1.93% 61,225 1.90% 58,645 2.02%
5. Tagalog (Filipino/Pilipino) 60,085 1.69% 29,740 0.92% 11,705 0.40%
6. Panjabi (Punjabi) 49,940 1.41% 36,320 1.13% 22,535 0.78%
7. Spanish 44,020 1.24% 29,125 0.90% 19,820 0.68%
8. Arabic 28,000 0.79% 20,495 0.64% 15,390 0.53%
9. Ukrainian 24,575 0.69% 29,455 0.91% 33,970 1.17%
10. Selected Aboriginal languages 22,005 0.62% 20,890 0.65% 18,470 0.64%
Cree 16,745 0.47% 17,215 0.53% 15,105 0.52%
Blackfoot 3,035 0.09% 3,015 0.09% 2,630 0.09%
Dene 1,680 0.05% 1,585 0.05% 1,495 0.05%
Ojibway 455 0.01% 615 0.02% 645 0.02%
11. Vietnamese 21,195 0.60% 19,350 0.60% 16,680 0.57%
12. Urdu 19,900 0.56% 11,275 0.35% 4,910 0.17%
13. Polish 19,890 0.56% 21,990 0.68% 20,635 0.71%
14. Dutch 17,950 0.51% 19,980 0.62% 19,575 0.67%
15. Italian 11,960 0.34% 13,095 0.41% 13,935 0.48%
16. Korean 13,885 0.39% 10,845 0.33% 6,330 0.22%
17. Hindi 12,290 0.35% 8,985 0.28% 6,315 0.22%
18. Persian 10,655 0.30% 7,700 0.24% 3,700 0.13%
19. Serbo-Croatian (all) 10,195 0.29% 10,235 0.32% 9,500 0.33%
Croatian 3,960 0.11% 4,150 0.13% 4,195 0.14%
Serbian 3,560 0.10% 3,090 0.10% 2,125 0.07%
Bosnian 1,745 0.05% 1,745 0.05% N N
Serbo-Croatian 930 0.03% 1,250 0.04% 3,180 0.11%
20. Gujarati 8,675 0.24% 6,280 0.19% 4,910 0.17%
21. Portuguese 7,380 0.21% 7,205 0.22% 6,110 0.21%
22. Hungarian 6,700 0.19% 6,770 0.21% 6,985 0.24%
23. Romanian 6,550 0.18% 4,370 0.14% 2,890 0.10%
24. Somali 5,515 0.16% 3,130 0.10% 810 0.03%
25. Amharic 5,110 0.14% 2,785 0.09% 1,100 0.04%
26. Bengali 5.030 0.14% 2,710 0.08% 1,190 0.04%
27. Scandinavian languages 4,935 0.14% 6,045 0.19% 6,795 0.23%
Danish 2,805 0.08% 3,510 0.11% 3,615 0.12%
Norwegian 1,180 0.03% 1,245 0.04% 1,670 0.06%
Swedish 950 0.03% 1,145 0.04% 1,345 0.05%
28. Japanese 4,560 0.13% 4,555 0.14% 3,625 0.12%
29. African languages n.i.e. 3,380 0.10% 2,525 0.08% 930 0.03%
30. Bisayan languages 3,255 0.09% 1,370 0.04% N N
31. Ilocano 3,010 0.08% 1,885 0.06% N N
32. Greek 2,965 0.08% 3,305 0.10% 2,765 0.10%
33. Czech 2,880 0.08% 3,100 0.08% 3,520 0.12%
34. Malayalam 2,760 0.08% 1,550 0.05% 1,055 0.04%
35. Tamil 2,645 0.07% 1,385 0.04% 1,110 0.04%
36. Sindhi 2,560 0.07% 2,000 0.06% 1,990 0.07%
37. Turkish 2,460 0.07% 1,605 0.05% 810 0.03%
38. Afrikaans 2,420 0.07% N N N N
39. Tigrigna 2,340 0.07% 1,170 0.04% 800 0.03%
40. Slovak 2,145 0.06% 2,430 0.08% 1,605 0.06%
41 Niger-Congo languages, n.i.e. 2,075 0.06% N N N N
42 Sinhalese 1,940 0.05% 835 0.03% N N
43. Pashto 1,850 0.05% 1,175 0.04% 275 0.01%
44. Khmer (Cambodian) 1,745 0.05% 1,740 0.05% 1,450 0.05%
45. Albanian 1,685 0.05% N N N N
46. Nepali 1,605 0.05% N N N N
47. Swahili 1,455 0.04% 850 0.03% 380 0.01%
48. Oromo language 1,405 0.04% N N N N
49. Thai 1,310 0.04% N N 85 0.003%
50. Bulgarian 1,280 0.04% 1,020 0.03% 400 0.01%

Note: "n.i.e.": not included elsewhere

Other Languages

In addition to the table above, other mother tongues include:

Mother tongues of more than 355 persons (0.01%) are listed.


In addition to the single-language responses detailed above, about 62,505 people reported having more than one mother tongue. There were 49,970 responses of both English and a non-official language; 2,945 of both French and a non-official language; 8,410 of both English and French; and 1,185 of English, French and a non-official language.

Migration

Immigration

The 2011 Canadian census counted a total of 644,115 immigrants living in Alberta, 257,230 of whom arrived after 2001.
The most common countries of birth for immigrants living in Alberta were:[21]

Rank Place of Origin Total
1. Philippines 69,575
2. India 59,020
3. United Kingdom 58,245
4. China 49,595
5. United States 31,050
6. Vietnam 26,020
7. Germany 20,085
8. Pakistan 19,110
9. Hong Kong 17,300
10. Poland 16,335
11. Netherlands 15,290
12. Mexico 10,755
13. South Korea 9,575
14. Lebanon 8,390
15. Italy 8,050
16. Colombia 6,860
17. Ukraine 6,430
18. Ethiopia 6,375
19. Romania 6,235
20. South Africa 6,010

Other Places of Origin

In addition to the countries listed in the table above, there were also about:

{Countries of birth for more than 1,784 persons (0.05%) are shown.}

Internal migration

Net cumulative interprovincial migration per Province from 1997 to 2017, as a share of population of each Provinces
Net cumulative interprovincial migration per Province from 1997 to 2017, as a share of population of each Provinces

A total of 469,095 people moved to Alberta from other parts of Canada between 1996 and 2006 while 261,500 people moved in the opposite direction. These movements resulted in a net influx of 51,235 people from British Columbia, 42,180 people from Saskatchewan, 31,425 people from Ontario, 23,875 people from Manitoba, 18,820 people from Newfoundland and Labrador, 11,925 people from Nova Scotia, 11,720 people from Quebec, and 8,410 people from New Brunswick. During this period there was a net influx of 2,710 francophones from Quebec, 1,545 francophones from Ontario, 1,355 francophones from New Brunswick, 775 francophones from Saskatchewan, 575 francophones from Manitoba, 500 francophones from British Columbia, 340 francophones from Nova Scotia, and 5,585 anglophones from Quebec. (All net inter-provincial movements of more than 5,000 persons and net official language minority movements of more than 100 persons are given.)[22][23]

Religion

Over 60 percent of Albertans identify as Christian, while almost 32 percent of residents identify with no religion. The largest denominations are the Roman Catholic, United, Anglican, Lutheran, and Baptist Churches.

Almost 2 percent of Albertans are Mormons descended from pioneers who emigrated from Utah around the turn of the 20th century; there are three temples in the province. Alberta also has large numbers of Pentecostal, Presbyterians, and evangelical Christians.

There are significant numbers of Mennonites and Hutterites, which are communal Anabaptist sects. There are also many Jehovah's Witnesses and Reformed Christians, as well a significant population of Seventh-day Adventists in and around Lacombe where the Canadian University College is located.

Alberta is also home to several Eastern Rite Churches as part of the legacy of Eastern European immigrants, including the Ukrainian Catholic Eparchy of Edmonton, and the Ukrainian Orthodox Diocese of Edmonton and Western Canada. There are 500 Doukhobors living in their few communities across Southern Alberta.

Many people of the Hindu, Sikh, and Muslim faiths also make Alberta their home; one of the largest Sikh temples in Canada is located just outside Edmonton. Most of Alberta's Jewish population of 10,900 lives in Calgary and Edmonton.

Religion (2011) 1 Denomination Congregation Proportion
Christian 2,152,200 60.3%
Catholic 866,305 24.3%
United Church 268,275 7.5%
Anglican Church 140,665 3.9%
Lutheran 119,345 3.3%
Baptist 66,635 1.9%
Pentecostal 60,960 1.7%
Eastern Orthodox and Oriental Orthodox 51,340 1.4%
Presbyterian 36,765 1.0%
Other Christian 541,520 15.2%
Muslim 113,445 3.2%
Sikh 52,335 1.5%
Buddhist 44,410 1.2%
Hindu 36,845 1.0%
Jewish 10,900 0.3%
Other Religions 16,605 0.5%
Aboriginal spirituality 15,100 0.4%
No religious affiliation 1,126,130 23.62%
^1 Statistics Canada. 2013. Alberta (Code 48) (table). National Household Survey (NHS) Profile. 2011 National Household Survey. Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 99-004-XWE. Ottawa. Released September 11, 2013.[24]

See also

Demographics of Canada's provinces and territories

Notes

  1. ^ The three most populated provinces, as of July 1, 2018 were Ontario with 14,322,757 inhabitants representing 38.6% of the Canadian population; Quebec with 22.6% or 8,390,499 people and British Columbia 13.5% and British Columbia with 4,991,687 people or 13.5%.

References

  1. ^ StatCan - Alberta population
  2. ^ "2001 Census Analysis Series - A profile of the Canadian population : where we live" (PDF). Statistics Canada. p. 6. Retrieved 2011-08-17.
  3. ^ [1] - Statistics Canada
  4. ^ Canada's population estimates: Total population, July 1, 2018 (Report). The Daily. Government of Canada. Statistics Canada. September 27, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2019.
  5. ^ Quarterly Population Report Third Quarter 2018 (PDF) (Report). December 20, 2018. p. 4. Retrieved January 16, 2019.
  6. ^ "Population statistics". Alberta Government. December 20, 2018. Retrieved January 16, 2019.
  7. ^ "Census of Population". February 7, 2017. Retrieved April 30, 2017.
  8. ^ a b "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, 2011 and 2006 censuses - 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2011-02-06. Retrieved 2011-02-13.
  9. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, census metropolitan areas and census agglomerations, 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2010-01-06. Retrieved 2012-03-02.
  10. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, Census Metropolitan Areas and Census Agglomerations, 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
  11. ^ A National Overview: Population and Dwelling Counts (1996 Census ed.). Ottawa: Statistics Canada. April 1997. ISBN 0-660-59283-5.
  12. ^ a b "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2006 and 2001 censuses - 100% data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. 2010-01-06. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
  13. ^ "2011 Municipal Codes" (PDF). Alberta Municipal Affairs. 2011-01-05. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
  14. ^ "Population and dwelling counts, for Canada, provinces and territories, and census subdivisions (municipalities), 2011 and 2006 censuses (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved April 3, 2012.
  15. ^ "Population and Dwelling Counts, for Canada, Provinces and Territories, and Census Subdivisions (Municipalities), 2001 and 1996 Censuses - 100% Data (Alberta)". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2011-04-10.
  16. ^ "1996 Community Profiles". Statistics Canada. Retrieved 2011-04-26.
  17. ^ Alberta (Code 48) (table). National Household Survey (NHS) Profile.
  18. ^ [2], Community Profiles from the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada - Province/Territory
  19. ^ [3], Aboriginal Population Profile from the 2011 Census, Statistics Canada - Province/Territory
  20. ^ Census Profile
  21. ^ National Household Survey (NHS) Profile, 2011
  22. ^ Province or Territory of Residence 5 Years Ago (14), Mother Tongue (8), Age Groups (16) and Sex (3) (2006 Census)
  23. ^ Province or Territory of Residence 5 Years Ago (14), Mother Tongue (8), Age Groups (16) and Sex (3) (2001 census)
  24. ^ "NHS Profile, 2011". Statistics Canada. Government of Canada. Retrieved 2 June 2016.
This page was last edited on 22 February 2019, at 02:03
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