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Defensive back

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A diagram of a standard 4-3 defense set.  The defensive backs include two cornerbacks (labeled CB on the diagram), a free safety (labeled FS) and a strong safety (labeled SS).
A diagram of a standard 4-3 defense set. The defensive backs include two cornerbacks (labeled CB on the diagram), a free safety (labeled FS) and a strong safety (labeled SS).

In gridiron football, defensive backs (DBs), also called the secondary, are the players on the defensive side of the ball who play furthest back from the line of scrimmage. They are distinguished from the other two sets of defensive players, the defensive linemen who play directly on the line of scrimmage, and the linebackers, who play in the middle of the defense, between the defensive line and the defensive backs.[1][2]

Among the defensive backs, there are two main types, cornerbacks, which play nearer the line of scrimmage and the sideline, whose main role is to cover the opposing team's wide receivers, and the safeties, who play further back near the center of the field, and who act as the last line of defense. The standard defense usually includes two of each, a left and right cornerback, as well as a strong safety and a free safety, with the free safety tending to play further back than the strong safety. Additionally, in Canadian football, which has twelve players on the field compared to the eleven of American football, there is an additional player called a defensive halfback, which plays like a hybrid between a linebacker and cornerback.

Pittsburgh Steelers defensive back Deshea Townsend jumps for the ball with Los Angeles Rams wide receiver Drew Bennett
Pittsburgh Steelers defensive back Deshea Townsend jumps for the ball with Los Angeles Rams wide receiver Drew Bennett

Besides the standard set of defensive backs, teams may also remove a defensive lineman or a linebacker and replace them with an additional defensive back. The fifth defensive back is commonly called the nickelback (so named because a five-cent coin in the U.S. and Canada is called a nickel). By extension, a sixth defensive back is called a dimeback (because the next value coin in the U.S. and Canada is called a dime). Rarely, teams may employ seven or even eight defensive backs.

Historic notable defensive backs include Dick "Night Trane" Lane, Mike Haynes, Ronnie Lott, and Troy Polamalu.

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Transcription

References

  1. ^ "Defensive Back - DB Definition - Sporting Charts". www.sportingcharts.com.
  2. ^ "The Positions in a Football Secondary - dummies". dummies.com.

See also

Positions in American football and Canadian football
Offense (Skill position) Defense Special teams
Linemen Guard, Tackle, Center Linemen Tackle, End, Edge rusher Kicking players Placekicker, Punter, Kickoff specialist
Quarterback (Dual-threat, Game manager, System) Linebacker Snapping Long snapper, Holder
Backs Halfback/Tailback (Triple-threat, Change of pace), Fullback, H-back, Wingback Backs Cornerback, Safety, Halfback, Nickelback, Dimeback Returning Punt returner, Kick returner, Jammer, Upman
Receivers Wide receiver (Eligible), Tight end, Slotback, End Tackling Gunner, Upback, Utility
Formations (List)NomenclatureStrategy
This page was last edited on 5 March 2021, at 20:30
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