To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

David Mallet (director)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Mallet
Born David Victor Mark Mallet
(1945-12-17) 17 December 1945 (age 72)
West Horsley, Surrey, England
Nationality British
Occupation Producer, film director and music video director
Years active 1964–present

David Victor Mark Mallet (born 17 December 1945 in West Horsley, Surrey)[1][better source needed] is a British director. Mallet rose to prominence in the late 1970s as a director of the then new format of music videos with the hugely successful enterprise MGMM be co-founded with Scott Millaney, Brian Grant and Russell Mulcahy.[2] He is noted for his innovative work on hugely popular music videos in the 1980s, becoming one of the decade's most sought-after directors for this format. His work includes Iron Maiden's Run to the Hills, David Bowie's "Ashes to Ashes" and "Let's Dance", Rush's "Distant Early Warning", and Queen's "Radio Ga Ga" and "I Want to Break Free" videos. He has also served as a producer on television programmes including The Kenny Everett Video Show. He is also known for directing some concert recordings of soprano Sarah Brightman and other major live music and spectacle events such as 46664 and Cirque du Soleil. He has also directed such prominent concerts as Pink Floyd's Pulse and U2's PopMart: Live from Mexico City.

Videography

Music videos

As director:

Long-form videos

References

  1. ^ "David Mallet". Findmypast.co.uk. 
  2. ^ Rob Tannenbaum; Craig Marks (2011). I Want My MTV: The Uncensored Story of the Music Video Revolution. Penguin Group US. p. 1974. ISBN 978-1-101-52641-5. 

External links

This page was last edited on 25 April 2018, at 16:51.
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.