To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


David Lunn
Bishop of Sheffield
DioceseDiocese of Sheffield
In office1980–1997 (retired)
PredecessorGordon Fallows
SuccessorJack Nicholls
Other postsHonorary assistant bishop in York (1998–present)
Orders
Ordination1955 (deacon); 1956 (priest)
Consecrationc. 1980
Personal details
Born (1930-07-17) 17 July 1930 (age 90)
DenominationAnglican
Alma materKing’s College, Cambridge

David Ramsay Lunn (born 17 July 1930) is a British Anglican bishop. From 1980 to 1997, he was Bishop of Sheffield in the Church of England.

Lunn was born on Tyneside and educated at the Kings School, Tynemouth where he was Head Boy in 1947..[1][2][3]

An Anglo-Catholic, he was opposed to the ordination of women, seeing it as an issue that needed an examination at an ecumenical level. During his episcopacy, he oversaw an increase in lay ministry within the diocese, but also increased the number of clergy, and improved the diocese's financial position. The period also saw the creation of the Nine O'Clock Service within one of the diocese's churches. Initially this seemed to be a successful attempt to broaden the appeal of the church, but in the end the project collapsed, and required strong leadership from Lunn to heal the resulting wounds. Following the Hillsborough Disaster, he implemented the clergy disaster plan to improve the church's response to such disasters in future.[1]

In 1997 Lunn was awarded an honorary LL.D. degree by Sheffield University.[4] On retirement he became an assistant bishop in the Diocese of York.

Works

Lunn wrote a multi-volume history of the area covered by the diocese including Rivers, Rectors and Abbots and Kings, Canals and Coal.[5]

A keen gardener, he also wrote the booklet Roses Wild: A little book by the Bishop of Sheffield concerning the roses in his garden at Bishopscroft

References

  1. ^ a b A Brief Synopsis Of Previous Bishops Of The See Of Sheffield Archived 2008-10-25 at the Wayback Machine, Tony Beck, Diocese of Sheffield. Retrieved on 2008-10-30.
  2. ^ "No. 48028". The London Gazette. 13 December 1979. p. 15699.
  3. ^ "No. 54888". The London Gazette. 9 September 1997. p. 10205.
  4. ^ Calendar of Sheffield University—Honorary Graduates[permanent dead link]
  5. ^ Thorne and District Gazette—'Snippets' of Yesteryear—The Battle of Hatfield Archived 2008-09-05 at the Wayback Machine, Ben Brown, Thorne-Moorends Town Council. Retrieved on 28 October 2008.
Religious titles
Preceded by
Gordon Fallows
Bishop of Sheffield
1980–1997
Succeeded by
Jack Nicholls


This page was last edited on 9 April 2021, at 15:01
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.