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David Lewis (producer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Lewis
Born
David Levy

December 14, 1903
DiedMarch 13, 1987(1987-03-13) (aged 83)
OccupationMovie producer
Partner(s)James Whale

David Lewis (14 December 1903 in Trinidad, Colorado – 13 March 1987 in Los Angeles[1]), born David Levy, was a prominent Hollywood film producer in the 1940s and 1950s,[2] who produced such films as Dark Victory (1939), Arch of Triumph (1948), and Raintree County (1957). He worked for Warner Brothers, Paramount and M-G-M and was elected a vice president of Enterprise Productions, Inc. in 1946.

He was also the longtime companion of director James Whale from 1930 to 1952. Although they were separated at the time of Whale's death in 1957, Lewis later released the contents of Whale's suicide note. Whale was cremated per his request and his ashes were interred in the Columbarium of Memory at Forest Lawn Memorial Park, Glendale. When David Lewis died in 1987, his executor and Whale biographer James Curtis had his ashes interred in a niche across from Whale's.[3]

Lewis was portrayed in the 1998 film Gods and Monsters by David Dukes.

Filmography

Producer

Associate producer

Writer

Bibliography

References

  1. ^ "DAVID LEWIS, 83, DIES; PRODUCED CLASSIC FILMS". The New York Times. 16 March 1987. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 22 July 2015.
  2. ^ Slide, Anthony (25 November 2014). "It's the Pictures That Got Small": Charles Brackett on Billy Wilder and Hollywood's Golden Age. Columbia University Press. p. 398. ISBN 9780231538220.
  3. ^ Curtis, James (1998). James Whale: A New World of Gods and Monsters. Boston, Faber and Faber. ISBN 0-571-19285-8, p. 389

External links


This page was last edited on 14 September 2020, at 02:54
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