To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

David Cobb (Massachusetts politician)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

David Cobb
David Cobb.png
8th Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
In office
1809–1810
GovernorChristopher Gore
Preceded byLevi Lincoln Sr.
Succeeded byWilliam Gray
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's At-large district
In office
March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795
Preceded bySeat created
Succeeded bySeat eliminated
President of the Massachusetts Senate
In office
1801–1805
Preceded bySamuel Phillips Jr.
Succeeded byHarrison Gray Otis
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
In office
May 1789[1] – January 1793[1]
Preceded byTheodore Sedgwick
Succeeded byEdward Robbins
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives[1]
In office
May 1789[1] – January 1793[1]
Personal details
BornSeptember 14, 1748
Attleboro, Massachusetts
DiedApril 17, 1830(1830-04-17) (aged 81)
Taunton, Massachusetts
Political partyFederalist
Spouse(s)Eleanor Bradish[2]
RelationsRobert Treat Paine, brother in law.[3]
Children11[4]
ProfessionPhysician
Signature
Military service
Allegiance United States Continental Congress
Branch/serviceContinental Army, Massachusetts Militia
Years of service1776-1781, 1786
Ranklieutenant colonel, major general
Unit16th Massachusetts Regiment-Henry Jackson's regiment Massachusetts Militia, aide-de-camp on the staff of General George Washington
CommandsFifth Division of the Massachusetts Militia[1]
Battles/warsAmerican Revolutionary War, New York and New Jersey campaign, Battle of Springfield, Battle of Monmouth. Battle of Rhode Island,[3] Shays' Rebellion

David Cobb (September 14, 1748 – April 17, 1830) was a Massachusetts physician, military officer, jurist, and politician who served as a U.S. Congressman for Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat.

Biography

Born in Attleboro, Massachusetts, on September 14, 1748, Cobb graduated from Harvard College in 1766. He studied medicine in Boston and afterward practiced in Taunton, Massachusetts. He was a member of the Massachusetts Provincial Congress in 1775; lieutenant colonel of Jackson's regiment in 1777 and 1778, serving in Rhode Island and New Jersey; was aide-de-camp on the staff of General George Washington; appointed major general of militia in 1786 and rendered conspicuous service during Shays' Rebellion. He was a charter member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1780.[5]

Massachusetts Government

He served as a judge of the Bristol County Court of Common Pleas 1784–1796, and as a member of the State house of representatives 1789–1793, and the Massachusetts Senate, and served as Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and President of the Massachusetts Senate.

Congress

He was elected to the Third United States Congress (March 4, 1793 – March 3, 1795).

Maine

Cobb moved to Gouldsboro in the district of Maine in 1796 and engaged in agricultural pursuits; elected to the Massachusetts Senate from the eastern district of Maine in 1802 and served as president; elected to the Massachusetts Governor's Council in 1808; Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts in 1809; member of the board of military defense in 1812; chief justice of the Hancock County (Maine) court of common pleas; returned in 1817 to Taunton, where he died on April 17, 1830. His remains were interred in Plain Cemetery.

Cobb was elected a member of the American Antiquarian Society in 1814.[6]

Legacy

In 1976, David Cobb was honored by being on a postage stamp for the United States Postal Service.

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Porter, Joseph Whitcomb (July – August 1888), Bangor Historical Magazine Vol. IV Memoir of Gen. David Cobb and family of Gouldsborough, Maine, and Taunton, Mass, Bangor, Maine, p. 2
  2. ^ Porter, p. 6.
  3. ^ a b The Daughters of Liberty (1904), Historical researches of Gouldsboro, Maine, Gouldsboro, Maine: The Daughters of Liberty, p. 22
  4. ^ Porter, pp. 6–7.
  5. ^ "Charter of Incorporation of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences". American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on November 11, 2014. Retrieved July 28, 2014.
  6. ^ American Antiquarian Society Members Directory

References

External links

Political offices
Preceded by
[Data unknown/missing.]
Member of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
May 1789 – January 1793
Succeeded by
[Data unknown/missing.]
Preceded by
Theodore Sedgwick
Speaker of the Massachusetts House of Representatives
May 1789 – January 1793
Succeeded by
Edward Robbins
U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Seat created
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Massachusetts's at-large congressional seat

March 4, 1793 – March 4, 1795
Succeeded by
Seat eliminated
Political offices
Preceded by
[Data unknown/missing.]
Member of the Massachusetts State Senate
1801–1805
Succeeded by
[Data unknown/missing.]
Preceded by
Samuel Phillips Jr.
President of the Massachusetts State Senate
1801–1805
Succeeded by
Harrison Gray Otis
Preceded by
Levi Lincoln Sr.
Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts
1809–1810
Succeeded by
William Gray
This page was last edited on 18 July 2019, at 07:31
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.