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Daniel Webster Comstock

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Daniel Webster Comstock
Daniel Webster Comstock

Daniel Webster Comstock (December 16, 1840 – May 19, 1917) was a U.S. Representative from Indiana.

Born in Germantown, Ohio, Comstock attended the common schools, and was graduated from the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, in 1860. He studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1861 and commenced practice in New Castle, Indiana. He served as district attorney in 1862. During the Civil War enlisted in the Ninth Indiana Cavalry and was successively promoted to regimental sergeant major, first lieutenant, captain, and acting assistant adjutant general in the military division of Mississippi. He settled in Richmond, Indiana, in 1866. City attorney in 1866. He served as prosecuting attorney of the Wayne circuit court 1872–1874. He served as member of the State senate in 1878. He served as judge of the seventeenth judicial circuit 1886–1895. He served as judge of the appellate court 1896–1911. He resumed the practice of law.

Comstock was elected as a Republican to the Sixty-fifth Congress and served from March 4, 1917, until his death in Washington, D.C., May 19, 1917. He was interred in Earlham Cemetery, Richmond, Indiana.

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  • ✪ Dubuque Senior High School 2017-2018 Annual Commencement
  • ✪ Calamity Jane

Transcription

(lively drum music) (audience clapping) (lively drum music) (audience cheering & clapping) (lively drum music) (audience clapping) ("Pomp and Circumstance") (audience clapping) Let's give another round of applause for our Dubuque Senior High School band. The drum line, and our fabulous director, Mr. Bill Rowley. Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. My is Dan Johnson, I'm the principal at Dubuque Senior High School. For your safety, we would like to call your attention to the location of the emergency exits located along the 5th Street exit over here, in the northeast and the northwest corners of the facility. In case of severe weather, please remain in your seats for instructions and the ushers will escort you to a designated area. For the convenience of others, and in respect to honoring this ceremony, please silence your cell phones and other electronic devices, like I just did before we started. At this time I ask you to rise, remove your hats while we honor our country with the Senior High singers singing our national anthem. Our graduates, with their caps and gowns being considered their active uniforms for this ceremony, are not required to remove their caps. Mr. Slay. ♪ O say can you see ♪ ♪ By the dawn's early light ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hailed ♪ ♪ At the twilight's last gleaming ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ Through the perilous fight ♪ ♪ O'er the ramparts we watched ♪ ♪ Were so gallantly streaming ♪ ♪ And the rocket's red glare ♪ ♪ The bombs bursting in air ♪ ♪ Gave proof through the night ♪ ♪ That our flag was still there ♪ ♪ O say does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ O'er the land of the free ♪ ♪ And the home of the brave ♪ (audience clapping) Lauren Connolly is our student council president and leader of our student body. During her high school experience, Lauren has participated in student council, cheerleading, soccer, speech, and Spanish club, earning five Major Ds and six Dubuque Senior academic excellence awards during her high school experience, she is ranked amongst the top students in her graduating class. She is the recipient of the Principal's Leadership Award, and in the fall she will attend the University of Northern Iowa, where she will study communications. She is the proud daughter of Joe, a teacher at a Senior High School, and Pam Connolly. Ladies and gentlemen, Lauren Connolly. (audience clapping) Good afternoon, my name is Lauren Connolly and I'm the student council president. I somehow managed to get over 50 credits without taking a single metal's class from my Dad, Mr. Joe Connolly. Now, I would like to welcome you all to Dubuque Senior High School's 2018 graduation ceremony. As defined by Merriam-Webster, graduation is the receiving or conferring of an academic degree or diploma. I would have to argue that graduation is so much more than a piece of paper. It's the culmination of the years of school that have shaped each of us into who we are today. This piece of paper represents at least 13 years of experience, development, and growth. It displays the commitment and dedication of everyone of my classmates in front of me. Behind this diploma is every early morning spent finding a parking spot in a somewhat close proximity to the school, every late night spent maybe not doing homework, and every class, shift at work, and sports or music practice in between. As we hung up our IDs on the Ram statue during our final walk out of the building, we made sure to leave our mark on Senior High School and ensure that no one forgets the class of 2018. As for the students, we have received many valuable life lessons during our time at Senior. We will never forget all the selfies with Dr. Johnson, every Nasty Nation hype video, and all the fire alarms that went off during construction even though there was never an actual fire. But most importantly, we will never forget that once a Ram, always a Ram. As my last act as president, I welcome you all to today's ceremony and hope you enjoy the celebration. (audience clapping) We will now have a selection by our orchestra. They will be performing Dreaming by Brian Balmages, and director by Mr. Andrew Geyssens. (instruments tuning) ("Dreaming") (audience clapping) Superintendent Stan Rheingans has been with the Dubuque Community School District since 2004 when he served as the executive director of human resources. In 2012, he moved into his current leadership role as Superintendent. Prior to moving to Dubuque, Mr. Rheingans was a high school principal in Wilton, Iowa for five years as well as a social studies teacher at North Scott High School and Freeport High School. A decorated military veteran, Mr. Rheingans served in the United States Army, and is a recipient of the Bronze Star. He holds a Bachelor's Degree from Loras College and a Master's Degree from his beloved University of Iowa. He resides here to be with his wife Jen and their three children. Please welcome Mr. Stain Rheingans. (audience clapping) Thank you, Benedict. I'm gonna try and start a little bit smoother than I did this morning where I said Senior High School to the Hempstead graduates, so... (audience laughing) Before we begin, that's a true story. Before we begin, I do want to introduce some people who worked really hard on behalf of the students and the community to make sure we have a great school district, and to introduce our school board. School Board President, Tami Ryan. (audience clapping) Vice President, Tom Barton. (audience clapping) Board member, Nancy Bradley. (audience clapping) Board member Anderson Sainci. (audience clapping) Board member and retired Senior High teacher, Jim Prochaska. (audience clapping) And board member, Lisa Wittman. (audience clapping) Senior class of 2018, you've made it. For the past 13 years, you have all worked towards the goal of reaching this day. And today you will graduate from a high school that is routinely recognized as being one of the top high schools in the state of Iowa. I know that journey has not always been easy, but you have persevered, and today the entire Dubuque community is proud of you. I want to leave with five very short pieces of advice. Have confidence in yourself and your education. You have had great teachers and been given a great education. You are more prepared than you may think. Define success for yourself. Don't let society tell you what it means to be successful. Find your passion and live a life working towards that everyday. Dream big to work hard. Hard work without a dream may lead you down the wrong path, and a big dream without the commitment to work hard will go unrealized and lead to frustration. Be grateful. Be grateful for all of the people in your life who make your achievements possible. Make it a habit to thank those who support you through your success and your failures. None of us succeed on our own. And finally, be nice. Treating people the way you'd like to be treated is a simple yet effective way to be successful every day. Today and this week, take some time to celebrate this important milestone. Please remember that today is important not only because it signifies the accomplishment of an important goal, but it also represents the starting line of your next chapter of your life. You have been prepared well by your teachers, and I congratulate those of you who have arrived at graduation having accomplished much; you certainly have a headstart into the future. But I challenge all of you to believe that from this day forward, anything is possible for each of you. You have an opportunity to find success for yourself, your future is limited only by your willingness to dream big and work hard everyday to accomplish your goals. Congratulations, Senior class of 2018. We are proud of you. (audience clapping) Today we'll have two student speakers. Our first student speaker is Emily Tigges. Miss Tigges attended Table Mound Elementary School, Eleanor Roosevelt Middle School, and, of course, Dubuque Senior High School. During her high school experience, Emily has participated in cross country, soccer, track, volleyball, marching band, concert band, and orchestra, and some of those even at the same time. Emily has been an All State band participant, a National Honors Society member, and she is the recipient of a Silver Cord, and newly initiated program by the class of 2018. In the fall, she will attend Mount Mercy University and she will double major in biology, on the premed track, and music. She is the daughter John and Cheryl Tigges. Ladies and gentlemen, Miss Emily Tigges. (audience clapping) Welcome grandparents, parents, relatives, friends, and class of 2018. We finally made it after 13 years. (audience clapping) I'd first like to thank my parents, John and Cheryl Tigges, for their endless support, my many friends for being my confidantes, my brother for not just being my brother but being my best friend, and my teachers and coaches for teaching me about life as well as the required lessons. I'd also like to give a special thanks to my music teachers, Rohl Grog, Andrew Geyssens, Mr. Brian E-Nab-net, and Mr. Dan Norman, because they helped me discover myself as well as help me grow musically. Without each and every one of you, I could not be here today. So, thank you from the bottom of my heart. For those of you who don't know me, my name is Emily Tigges. I have participated in many activities, including concert band, marching band, full orchestra, cross country, track, soccer and freshman year volleyball. I'm not valedictorian, as you can see, that's Nadia Wade, and I'm not salutatorian, that is Elle Connolly. I'm an average student that has walked the halls at Dubuque Senior High School. While obtaining these honors would have been great, I have grown intellectually while being a student at Senior. For example, Miss Jorgensen taught me that I can be a successful citizen without being number one, and Mr. Fisher taught me that glory comes from hard word and extreme dedication on and off the course. While many lessons have yet to be taught, we have been continuously learning lessons since we have been children. While reading to my eight-year old sister, Sophia, I discovered the lessons the books were trying to teach the reader, a concept I never grasped until I was older. As children, we are so focused on the color of the main character's shirt rather than the life lessons being taught within the story. However, when I revisited these, I discovered important advice that is applicable to the reader's life, whether they are 10 years old or a hundred years old. For example, in the Engine That Could, the reader learned about perseverance, and in The Giving Tree, the reader learned about the importance of giving and the importance of selflessness. Today, I brought a children's book that my Mom gave me a few years back. You won't be able to see the illustrations, but that's not the point. The story is called I Wish You More. I wish you more ups than downs, I wish you more give than take. I wish you more tippy toes than deep. I wish you were more we than me. I wish you more hugs than ughs. I wish you more woo-hoos than whoas. I wish you more will than hill. I wish you more can than not. I wish you more snowflakes than tongue. I wish you more pause than fast-forward. I wish you more umbrella than rain. I wish you more bubbles than bath. I wish you more treasures than pockets. I wish you more stories than stars. I wish all of this for you, because you are everything I could wish for and more. Class of 2018, it was an honor to be a part of your journey, and I am extremely thankful for you being a part of mine. As life continues, I wish all of you perseverance, happiness, love, strength, and success. I wish you all of these things and more. Thank you. (audience clapping) Our next speaker is Nadia Wade. Miss Wade is the valedictorian for the class of 2018. She attended Bryant Elementary School, George Washington Middle School, and, of course, Dubuque Senior High School. During her high school career Nadia participated in coding club, first tech challenge club, soccer and cross country. She was awarded the First Congressional Merit Award, the First Citizens Award, and she is recognized as a Governor Scholar. In the fall, Nadia will attend Massachusets Institute of Technology, MIT, where she will major in electrical engineering and computer science. She is the proud daughter of Bill and Larico Wade. Ladies and gentlemen, Miss Nadia Wade. (audience clapping) Fellow graduates, as you all know, this journey was one that could not have been traveled alone. Therefore, I'd like to take a second to thank those who helped us along our journeys. First off, all the teachers and coaches who worked hard everyday to push us beyond our self-perceived limits. For me, that was Mr. Kilgore who listened to me fumble with my speech about several times. Mrs. Gorinsen and Miss Jorgensen who cultivated my love of technology, and Mr. Fisher, who reintroduced me to the joys of running. I'd also like to thank all of our families, whether they be blood or not, and friends, who had our backs every step of the way. Kayla, Abby, Hannah, you guys have always been there for me these past four years. Stacy, thanks for all the lovely winter runs. And shout out to Libby, who only did soccer this season for this one moment. Mia, you were a pain in my butt, I appreciate it. And thank you to my father and the rest of my family for coming to support me today. Most of all, I'd like to thank all of you, my classmates, for challenging and changing my perception, and Norica Wade, my mom, whom this speech is about. So, most of you know her, right? Or least heard her yell, "Go Nadia, go," at some sporting event. Yeah, so by conventional measures of society, my Mom wouldn't necessarily be described as intelligent when compared to other people. She's not dumb, don't get me wrong. But she isn't the CEO of some company, a teacher, a doctor, or any other professional that holds prestige in our society. Since elementary school, she wasn't able to help me with my math or English homework. And in fact, until about the second grade, I didn't know Adidas wasn't pronounced like Ad-did-as. But none of these things ever mattered to me, as I always saw her as one of the most intelligent people I've ever known. As a toddler, there were nights when I stayed up with a flashlight, trying to fold the origami with a confusing set of instructions, and the next morning my mother would perfectly fold it in under a minute, leaving me in awe. She would show me her picture albums of her traveling the world, as she'd recollect the memories and told me all the things to watch out for. And as I walked through Japanese temples and skim my fingers along its walls and the surfaces of statues, my mother brought them to light with their stories and histories. Furthermore, to this very day, I'll pester my Mom to translate different phrases into Japanese, and hang around in her room just to hear her accurately switch from English to her native language when answering the phone. More than that, it's different aspects of her character that I really admire, such as her ability to persevere in the face of ignorance, when people treat her as something lower and easily exploit it because of her accent or background. My mother is never apologetic for her roots, and she never backs down. She knows exactly who she is and what she wants in life. In an endless sea of hazy question marks that aimlessly wander, she's a bold red exclamation point that charges directly through to her goals. With that, my mother has been a lunch lady, a swim instructor, a translator, a busser, a travel agent, and more. And she's always strived to do her job to the best of her ability. Currently, my mom is a pair-up, because she knows what it's like to be completely misunderstood and wants to help those who need it, like the little boy who doesn't speak English very well and actually doesn't speak very much at all. My mother went out of her way to help him, recognizing a younger version of herself. And now she'll be the first person he'll go to when he has trouble in school. She may not be changing the world on a grand scale, but she's making a difference by shaping the lives of others, such as mine. The reason I'm standing as a valedictorian today is 100% because of her, as she inspired my love of learning and enriched my life with her culture. For all these reasons and more, I never thought my mom wasn't as smart as other people. So I guess what I'm trying to say is don't let tangible standards define intangible terms, such as intelligence and success. These terms are so broadly defined that it's really up to each of you to specifically define it on your own. With that, people's definitions of intelligence and success change throughout their lives. The people sitting to your left and to your right will each find different meanings associated with these words. And in 20 years, the three of you may find that you've compiled an entire dictionary of different definitions of success and intelligence. So never be afraid to ask yourself, even if it's for the thousandth time: What makes you feel intelligent? What is success to you? Thank you, and congrats class of 2018. (audience clapping) We will now have a song by our Senior High School singers. As they deftly make their way over to the risers. They'll be singing The Longest Time, which is by far one of my favorites, and selected by the choir. As arranged by Kirby Shaw and directed by Mr. Steve Slay. ♪ Whoa oh oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest ♪ ♪ If you said goodbye to me tonight ♪ ♪ There would still be music left to write ♪ ♪ What else could I do ♪ ♪ I'm so inspired by you ♪ ♪ That hasn't happened for the longest time ♪ ♪ Once I thought my innocence was gone ♪ ♪ Now I know that happiness goes on ♪ ♪ That's where you found me ♪ ♪ When you came and stood beside me ♪ ♪ I haven't been there for the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest ♪ ♪ I'm that voice you're hearing in the hall ♪ ♪ And the greatest miracle of all ♪ ♪ Is how I need you ♪ ♪ And how you needed me too ♪ ♪ That hasn't happened for the longest time ♪ ♪ Maybe this won't last very long ♪ ♪ But this feels so right ♪ ♪ Yet I could be wrong ♪ ♪ Maybe I've been hoping too hard ♪ ♪ But I've come this far ♪ ♪ And it's more than I hoped for ♪ ♪ Who knows how much further we'll go on ♪ ♪ Maybe I'll be sorry when you're gone ♪ ♪ I'll take my chances ♪ ♪ I forgot how nice this place is ♪ ♪ I haven't been there for the longest time ♪ ♪ I had second thoughts at the start ♪ ♪ I said to myself ♪ ♪ Hold on to your heart ♪ ♪ Now I know the person that you are ♪ ♪ You're wonderful so far ♪ ♪ And it's more than I hoped for ♪ ♪ I don't care what consequence it brings ♪ ♪ I have been a fool for lesser things ♪ ♪ I want this so bad ♪ ♪ I think you ought to know that ♪ ♪ I intend to know you for the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest time ♪ ♪ Whoa oh oh oh ♪ ♪ For the longest time ♪ (audience clapping) Our first faculty speaker is Mr. Chris Miller. Mr. Miller attended Loras College where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in history. After graduating from Loras he began his teaching career at Dubuque Senior High School, and he is completing his 5th year working in our house. During his time at Dubuque Senior, he has served as the head coach of our girls tennis team, an assistant coach for our boys swimming team, and is one of the advisors for student council. Known as an energetic teacher who throws his all into his instruction, regardless of the temperature in his classroom, he works up a sweat everyday, teaching our Rams. Ladies and gentlemen, Mr. Chris Miller. (audience clapping) Welcome everyone. Thank you for being here. This is truly a special occasion, and graduates, if you're not sure how special this is, look around at how full this place is. That shows that you really have done something special to be here. You should be proud of what you've done. But, I hope that in your four years, you also did something that made you a little nervous, that challenged you along the way. I hope you didn't coast through. And maybe being here was the challenge. Maybe the four years it took to get to this spot was not easy. Maybe you to AP classes? Maybe you went out for a club or a sport that you wouldn't have gone out for normally? Maybe you auditioned for the musical? Something that I've wanted to do for years, but I'm afraid to; not so much for me, but for those who have to listen to me sing and audition and more terrifyingly, see me dance. I had a student message me before this and say as a history teacher, I needed to use evidence to support my claims of this speech and this is the perfect time to prove to you by using evidence that I'm not a good singer. So, I'm not gonna do it because it would be miserable for all of you. But I hope you did something that made you a little nervous, that challenged you a little bit. For me, it's this speech. I love that I got to be in front of all of you, every single day and talk, but being in front of faculty, staff, this is a terrifying thing. But, nerves are okay. Nerves get a bad rap. But they show you and they let you know that you're in an opportunity to grow, and let you know when you're in an opportunity to get better and to challenge yourself. For example, I may not be the best public speaker, but this is an opportunity for me to grow in that opportunity and it's those nerves that help me to do that. And it's those nerves that help you learn and continue to learn. And that's the one thing I hope you take away from your four years of high school, is I hope you never stop learning. My high school cross-country coach gave me my favorite piece of advice that I've ever had, and that was, "Imagine how smart you would be "if you learned just one new thing "every day for the rest of your life. "Just one." And it took me a long time to realize that he didn't mean just memorizing facts, because if you've had me in class you know that that's not what matters. It doesn't matter that Columbus sailed the ocean blue in 1822 or that Martin Luther King Jr. was key leader of the protestant reformation, and I hope that a lot of you are realizing I'm making mistakes up here, 'cause if not, our social studies department may have failed you along the way. (audience laughing) But, that's not what he meant. What he wanted us to learn, was he wanted you to learn something about the world you live in, he wanted you to learn something about yourself. He wants you to learn something about the people who are around you and not just the ones you spend all your time with. He wanted me to learn something about people I don't know much about. Because once you start doing that, you realize that you don't have all the answers. And that's a terrifying thing, at least for me. I love being right. Actually, more than that, I hate being wrong. But, it's okay to realize that we don't have all the answers and that once you start to realize that, you realize that other people can bring things to the table. You have to corroborate your story with other people's. And if you thought I was gonna go the entire speech without doing some historical document analysis, you either never had me in class or you're kidding yourself. All right, but that's what we have to do. You have to take your story and corroborate with other people's. That's how we get better. That's how we start to unify. That's how we start to come together. And like I said, that's a scary thing but those nerves that you feel, that fear that you have some times, that's not a bad thing because it helps you change. When I was in high school, I don't know if they do it anymore, but we used to do the whole signing the yearbooks things. I don't see it as much, but one of the things people always wrote was, "Don't ever change." And one of my high school teachers said, "That is the most miserable piece of advice "someone can ever give you." And my evidence for that is I want you all to take a minute right now and think about how you were as freshmen. (laughs) Ya. And now imagine you didn't change over the four years and you were the exact same person you are now. I had a lot of you on the tennis team as freshmen. I had a lot of you as sophomores at class. You're great people, but there is room for change. And that's not a bad thing, that's a good thing. You always want to keep changing. I hope you take one thing away, it's that you always change. This is an amazing thing you've done to be here. But it doesn't end here, I hope you keep going after you graduate. I hope you keep taking challenges that make you nervous. I hope you keep learning. I hope you keep changing to improve yourself. I hope you listen to other people to do that. I hope you keep yourself open. And I hope you be proud of who you are and what you've done. You have done amazing things, every single one of you. But don't let that pride blind you to what other people can bring to the table. Don't let that pride close you off to what you can become. So again, thank you for giving me this opportunity. I'm honored. This is an amazing place to be, again, as we can see from everyone around us. So thank you for that, but more importantly than thanking you for letting me be here, thank you for teaching me something along the four years. I hope you never stop teaching each other, but more importantly, I hope you never stop learning. Thank you. (audience clapping) Our next faculty speaker is Miss Amanda Benson. Miss Benson attended the Pennsylvania State University where she earned a Bachelor of Science in agriculture and environmental education. And she has earned a Master's of Art Degree in science education from Northern Iowa. She has taught at Southwestern High School in Wisconsin, Jones Jr. High, Eleanor Roosevelt Middle School, and then she graduated in 2014 when she started teaching in our house at Dubuque Senior High School. She's also currently an instructor at Emmaus Bible College. She's married to Chris Benson and she is the proud parent of Carrice and Carly. Ladies and gentlemen, Miss Amanda Benson. (audience clapping) Thank you, Ram friends, family members, Dubuque Senior, alumni, faculty, staff, administrators, school board members, superintendent, and graduates of class of 2018. Class of 2018, you hold a special place in my heart. I am honored to share today with you. Seven years ago I was lucky enough to meet many of you as you came to Roosevelt Middle School for 6th grade orientation. You were wide-eyed and filled with emotion; excited to take the next step but slightly hesitant. As I look out at you today, I see the same looks. Your parents on that evening stood in the background as you prepared to launch yourself into your middle school career, which would lead to high school, and eventually to this very day. Their looks today are very similar to seven years ago. Their faces show excitement and pride, and for some, an element of relief. Unlike many secondary teachers, I've been able to not share one or two years with you, but many of you I've shared seven years with. I've been able to follow you from 6th grade, to 8th grade, to 9th grade. After your freshmen year, our connections grew as I saw you on the court, on the pit, on the stage, and daily exchanges in the hallway. I have embraced every opportunity to celebrate with you and to mourn with you, to laugh with you, and to love on you. Each interaction reinforcing that we are the Ram Fam. There's one great lesson that I have learned during our last four years together at Senior. Although we are a school, we really are a family. Family is more than just acquiring information from a source, family is built on love. Knowledge is temporary and incomplete, whereas love never fails and will keep you together. Love is a mindset. When love meets someone, it asks what is their need. Love does not look for what it can get from others. Love stands above everything in our life. Hope will outpour as an expression of your love. Dubuque Senior is a community, not centered singularly on knowledge or sports or money, nor popularity. Our house is skillfully built on a foundation of love. Please take this foundation and build your own radical new communities, centered on love. Don't just be full of light as you move forward, but also be full of love. Love is patient and love is kind. Love does not envy and does not boast. Love is not arrogant and love is not rude. Love is not irritable or resentful. Love rejoices in the truth. Love always protects, always trusts, and always hopes. It always endures. Love never fails. You've spent time as a Ram, growing into who you are, growing in knowledge and in skill and in love. It has been a beautiful process to witness. You are full of knowledge and love. Knowledge is beneficial, but love is the antidote to the issues that arise in life. Enjoy the emotion and accomplishment of today and do not be hesitant about the future. Take what you have learned in your head and in your heart and go, live it out in love. (audience clapping) Parents, it's about to be that time. So, if you are so inclined, you may take pictures of your graduates in the corded off area to my left, as we go through the awarding and the presentation of the diplomas. I will need my marshals to get into place. Will the class of 2018 please stand. (audience clapping & cheering) Ladies and gentlemen. That's a beautiful sound right there. Our Rams are coordinated. Ladies and gentlemen, members of the Board of Education, Superintendent Rheingans, I certify that this class has fulfilled the requirements, as set forth by the Board of Education and the state of Iowa, for graduation from Dubuque Senior High School. I present them to you and recommend they be granted their diplomas. Student class president, National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Lauren Jean Connolly. (audience clapping) Class vice-president, National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Kirsten Noel Lucy. National Honor Society president, graduating with highest honors, Benedict Johannes Schultz. National Honor Society vice-president, graduating with honors, Paige Johanna Kaiser. National Honor Society secretary, graduating with honors, Abigail Violet Marcus. National Honor Society communications specialist, graduating with honors, Jaylen Michael Hildebrand. Senior class representative, National Honor Society member and graduating with honors, Connor David Ariss. Senior class representative, graduating with honors, Benjamin Michael Chapman. Senior class representative, National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Elizabeth Mary Connolly. Senior class representative, Caleb Alden Drake. Senior class representative, graduating with honors, April Anne Fryhaggy. Senior class representative, graduating with honors, John Michael Grant. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Elizabeth Ruth Aikens. Elizabeth Alvarenga. Jacob Evan Ambrosi. Ryan Anthony Anglund. Laura Marie Angulo. Alex Christian Aragon. Graduating with honors, Addison Parker Aronson. Nathan Alexander Bailey. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Hannah Lynn Bakey. Troy Allen Barry. Josephine Hope Bartelotta. Daniel Allen Bastin. Graduating with honors, Nathan Robert Bastian. Graduating with honors, Austin Joseph Beck. Casey Joshua Beck. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Carson Ryan Bellus. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Anaise Reza Benedict. Serjon Sevante Bennet. Jacob Bernard Benson. Tyler Robert Benson. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Kalay Satchi Beale. Anna Catherine Billmeyer. Paige Anne Billmeyer. Alexis Gabrielle Birch. Graduating with honors, Brooke Hayes Boysonce. Jade Lynn Blozzer. Carson David Boland. Maximus James Boland. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Grace Anna Bradley. Austin James Breitbach. Anna Marie Brestrow. Dakota Lee Bremmer. Dylan Timothy Brocklin. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Anna Catherine Brondike. Savannah Rose Brown. Salem Christopher Bramaloo. Nathan McKay Buddy. Luke James Bullock, National Honor Society member, graduating with honors. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Hannah Elizabeth Burke. Shawn Steven Burns. Graduating with honors, McKenzie Jane Capacious. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Elizabeth Ruth Caperin. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Easton Fitzgerald Carver. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Taylor Morgan Carpenter. Logan Patrick Caudill. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Alec Michael Chanley. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Christopher Daniel Chapman. Alexandria Margaret Cheatham. Jamal Frances Asar Cheatam. Graduating with honors, Cameron Cougar Clay. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Keagan Arron Coates. Collin Michael Coleman. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Abbey Jean Conley. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Matthew Michael Connolly. Kenneth Wayne Cotton. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Olivia Gabrielle Cowart. Sydney Ameline Cruz. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Emily Clara Culbertson. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Cameron Scott Davis. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Grant Michael Day. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Samuel Stephen Day. Samantha Lea Dayton. Devon Joseph Dean. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jacob Anthony Dean. Graduating with honors, Ian James DeGree-Mueller. Samantha Anne Mattson Rengell Delgado. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Karissa Anne Demoss. Erin Irene Dimmer. Graduating with honors, Lauren Rae Debcke. Dean Alan Donith. Zachary Fitpatrick Titus Donith. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Alexis Jeanne DeRemus. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Faith Elizabeth Doyle. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Madeline Michele Dressler. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Olivia Renee Dudgin. Sunshine Rae Dear. Alexis Kayellen Duvey. Morgan Elaine Duvey. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Theresa Dora Easley. Keevan Malik Edwards. Hunter Gregory Egan. Nash Bryan Eggars. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Amy Charis English. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Anna Irene English. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Samantha Rose Ericson. Andrew Anthony Ershin. Graduating with honors, Kendra Grace Esau. Jacob Matthew Esser. Ryan Scott Estelle. Alexander James Faust. Destiny Lashawna Fern. Colton John Feagin. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Hailey Kathleen Fishel. Graduating with honors, Dylan Michael Flannigan. Wendy Flores Gonzales. Kierra Tamika Flowers. Jace Alexander Frye. Andrew James Frummel. Lewis Michael Frummel. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Ava Lea Frye. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, McKenzie Marie Garrity. Hannah Rae Gassman. Austin Tyler Gary. Brett Scott Guisler. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Kayla Michele Gibson. Tanner James Gordon. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Katherine Laurel Gorton. Tyler Daniel Grall. Jasmine Anne-May Granado. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Autumn Lynn Graw. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Chloe Marie Greiss. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Emma Mary Hageman. Ashley Anne Hakinson. Graduating with honors, Chaz James John Hancock. Shelby Lynn Hanley. Blake Daniel Harris. Josiah Harris. Malik Jabari Harris. Nicholas James Hatula. Grant Michael Haylock. Graduating with honors, Evan James Healy. Graduating with honors, Gabrielle Ariann Healy. Jackson Kenneth Healy. Bailey Russell Heyful. Graduating with honors, Ashley Anne Heiderschite. Mariel Hokina. Payton Jo Haling. Jordan Jessica Hennessy. David Hernandez. Jalyn Belle Hersch. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Hannah Rose Horner. Graduating with honors, Caleb James Hoffman. Morgan Eileen Hoffman. Evie Layne Holdren. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Caitlyn Rose Hughes. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Matthew David Hinker. Graduating with honors, Amber Mariah Hunter. Graduating with honors, Nathan Steven Hughesman. Emily Rodriguez Hyde. Relgish Memory Joash. Adrian Chandra Johnson. Graduating with honors, Liam Benedict Johnson. Aleta Betteragia Jolette. Sam Jones. Alexia Marie Kalley. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Lauren Elizabeth Kass. Sierra Gabrielle. Graduating with honors, Madelyn Renee Keller. Alexia Lea Kelly. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Tessa Rose Kemp. Shawn Michael Kirkenbush. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Grayson Christian Kincaid. Jayden Chad King. Tianni Renee Kirby. Isaac James Kirk. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Charles Nicholas Klapotowskus. Graduating with honors, Lauren Maureen Kloft. Daniel Parnell Klosner. Graduating with honors, Connor Alden Knapp. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jarett George Knowles. Selena Sekura Kobaya. Michael Joseph Koch. Graduating with honors, Hudson David Kaylor. Cody Thomas Keller. McKenna Anne Kappas. Amanda Maria Koster. Graduating with honors, Elliot Irvin Kramer. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Joseph William Cruz. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Eleanor Margaret Keyes. Graduating with honors, Toni Felicia Lafayette. Dakota Gene Blake. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Stephanie Lynn Lamb. Isabel Rose Lange. Janey Ezra Lohtie. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Hannah Kathleen Lobscher. Tyler John LoCante. Raymond Lamar Lee. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Emily Elizabeth Lameer. Ashley Sue Leesy. Robert Samuel Lewis. Patrina Levi. Jessica Michele Darlene Livermore. Alaina Rose Moss. Joseph Carl Maddox. Delaney Ray Magner. Graduating with honors, Austin Douglas Manders. Graduating with honors, Ashley Marie Marrow. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Carter Alexander McCarthy. Elizabeth Rose McClaine. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Ellen Margaret McDonnell. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Riley Joseph McDonnell. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Erin Marie McDunna. John Henry McPollin. Callie Marie Merfeld. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Casey Marie Mesher. Graduating with honors, Noah James Muse. Angelina Rose Miller. Taylor Anne Miller. Wyatt Christopher Miller. David William Miner. Kaylin Alexandra Mish. Blake William Misco. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Alexis Renee Mahler. Emily Rose Mott. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Grace Elizabeth Moreen. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Sophia Elizabeth Mozena. Graduating with honors, Luke Charles Millius. Logan James Millius. Graduating with honors, Kaylee Anne Mueller. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Matthew John Netter. China Ray Nelson. Craig Morris Nelson. Bailey Vincent Newowner. Robert Scott Nielsen. Graduating with honors, Jayden Nicole Noll. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Matthew Wayne Noll. Morgan Emma Noll. Graduating with honors, Justin Craig Noack. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Zachary Alan Obink. Graduating with honors, Logan Michael Oberfell. Dylan Dean Oberman. Graduating with honors, Collin Daniel O'Brien. Joshua James Ortell. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jacob Carl Olson. Bailey Anne Oher. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Katrina Lenae Owensby. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jacqueline Ruby Parr. Alexis Anne Patterson. Skylan Jay Peavy. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jaycee Lynn Peter. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Courtney Elizabeth Pfab. Dylan Andrew Pfab. Melissa Jeanette Pfeiffer. Maiko Deano Piquette. Shayanna Rose Pierce. Graduating with honors, Katherine Renee Pike. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Alexandra Helene Pinchuck. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Deidre Helene Pitsen. Taylor Thomas Plowman. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Amanda Jo Pollock. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Mia Catherine Rampton. McCray Jane Rapp. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Cathleen Luann Rasmussen. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Taylor Sue Redmond. Brayden Charles Reimer. Charles James Reimer. Jenny Joanne Reisen. (audience clapping) Andrew James Remickel. Graduating with honors, Jenna Anne Rettenmeier. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, James Andrew Rettenmeier. Alexander Anthony Richard. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Coby Michael Rydell-Ohlinger. Kevin Joseph Reiss. Eli Michael Rogers. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Angelo James Romanya. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Margaret Joanna Rooney. Evelyn Cheryl Rose Tolstead. Austin James Allen Russell. Samantha Rubio. Julia Catherine Sampson. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Kathleen Shay Sampson Brown. Graduating with honors, Spencer Connolly Schilling. Kelsey Lynne Schlichte. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Carter Matthew Schmidt. Christopher Michael Schmidt-Faber. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Samuel Thomas Schnay. Dakota Jeffery Schultis. Morgan Catherine Schueler. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Carter John Schultz. Brittany Olivia Shaw. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jackson Daniel Shavanetta. Brittany Margaret Sheldon. Monet Nicole Shoemaker. Claire Josephine Seigert. Katherine Elizabeth Simpson. Graduating with honors, Evian Danielle Simms. Michael Patrick Small. Isaac Richard Snyder. McKayla Marie Snyder. Lance Richard Sokolowski. McKayla Jade Spark. Graduating with honors, Austin Matthew Stare. Alexis May Stapleton. Kaylee Anne Starkey. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Mitchell Steven Steckline. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Olivia Maria Steckline. Graduating with honors, Carter Allen Stevens. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Julia Francesca Steerman. Graduating with honors, Rachel Eileen Stepanovich. Emily Raynette Stewart. Graduating with honors, Elizabeth Kate Tath. Camilla Patrice Teasdale. Alexander Paul Teixeira. Hunter Allen Toma. Nakita Sue Toma. Jack William Thomas. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jacob John Thompson. Brandon Michael Tease. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Allie Marie Tigges. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Emily Morgan Tigges. Graduating with honors, Spencer Joseph Till. Graduating with honors, Eric David Tupper. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Jenna Lynn Veach. Graduating with honors, Trevor Cameron Vile. Logan Matthew Vise. Zeek William Vasper. National Honor Society member, graduating with highest honors, Nadia Norico Wade. Graduating with honors, Devon Thomas Walker. Kylie Jo Walker. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Andrea Cathleen Waller. Graduating with honors, Taylor Marie Walsh. Venoch Megan Wahtak. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Nathaniel Wahtak. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Toming Wahtak. Artaysia Leshay Watson. Graduating with honors, Amanda Marie Webber. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Michael James Daniel Wellborn. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Thomas Daniel Randall Wellborn. Nikia Marie Welch. Juliana Noel Welsh. Dylan Michael Wallew. Cailyn Anne-Marie Wallew. Graduating with honors, William Patrick Wayland. Nathan Alan White. Zechaiah Sharday Deshell Williams. Andrea Marie Winders. Kennedy Nicole Woods. National Honor Society member, graduating with honors, Grace Naina Zucarro. (audience clapping) Would the class of 2018 please rise? (audience clapping & cheering) Rams, as you leave the hallowed halls of our house and venture out to do bigger and better things than Dubuque Senior High School, I encourage you to continue to represent our Ram Fam core values: Always be respectful in everything you do, and as always, be engaged. And always, always, always demonstrate and show your integrity. We have no doubt that you're gonna be successful. No doubt about that at all. We believe in you. You know that we love you and we love bragging about our Rams, so make sure you go out there and do your thing on the next level. I present for your recognition, ladies and gentlemen, Dubuque Senior High School's graduates of the class of 2018. (audience clapping & cheering) At this time, I need Eric Tupper and Jaylen Hildebrand to please come down front. We would call Mike Grant to come down to help us out, but he literally had to leave, for an engagement representing the state of Iowa here in Des Moines at a competition. Gentlemen, one last time, leading the nation, in the I Believe cheer. Take it away. I. I. I believe. I believe. I believe that. I believe that. I believe that we. I believe that we. I believe that we can jump. I believe that we can jump. I believe that we can jump. I believe that we can jump. (crowd cheering & clapping) Make sure everyone gets a hat. (laughs) Class of 2018, (audience clapping) class is dismissed. (audience clapping & cheering) (upbeat celebratory band music)

See also

References

  • United States Congress. "Daniel Webster Comstock (id: C000663)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

External links

 This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Finly H. Gray
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Indiana's 6th congressional district

1917
Succeeded by
Richard N. Elliott
This page was last edited on 16 May 2019, at 08:12
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