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Cynthia Lummis

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cynthia Lummis
Cynthia Lummis U.S. Senator.jpg
United States Senator
from Wyoming
Assumed office
January 3, 2021
Serving with John Barrasso
Preceded byMike Enzi
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large district
In office
January 3, 2009 – January 3, 2017
Preceded byBarbara Cubin
Succeeded byLiz Cheney
27th Treasurer of Wyoming
In office
January 4, 1999 – January 9, 2007
GovernorJim Geringer
Dave Freudenthal
Preceded byStan Smith
Succeeded byJoseph Meyer
Member of the Wyoming Senate
from the 5th district
In office
January 14, 1993 – January 10, 1995
Preceded byHarriet Elizabeth Byrd
Succeeded byDon Lawler
Member of the Wyoming House of Representatives
from the Laramie County district
In office
January 7, 1985 – January 14, 1993
In office
January 8, 1979 – January 3, 1983
Preceded byMulti-member district
Succeeded byMulti-member district
Personal details
Born
Cynthia Marie Lummis

(1954-09-10) September 10, 1954 (age 66)
Cheyenne, Wyoming, U.S.
Political partyRepublican
Spouse(s)
(m. 1983; died 2014)
Children1
EducationUniversity of Wyoming (BS, JD)
Signature
WebsiteSenate Website

Cynthia Marie Lummis Wiederspahn (/ˈlʌmɪs/ LUMM-iss;[1] born September 10, 1954) is an American politician who serves in the United States Senate from Wyoming as a member of the Republican Party. Prior to her tenure in the United States Senate she served in the Wyoming House of Representatives from Laramie County, Wyoming Senate from the 5th district, as Treasurer of Wyoming, and in the United States House of Representatives from Wyoming's at-large congressional district.

Lummis was born in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and educated at Cheyenne East High School and the University of Wyoming. She was elected to the Wyoming House of Representatives in 1978, becoming the youngest woman to serve in the state legislature. She was reelected twice, but chose to not seek another term in the 1984 election. She returned to the state house in the 1986 election and served until she was elected to the Wyoming Senate in the 1992 election against incumbent Senator Harriet Elizabeth Byrd. She served on Governor Jim Geringer's transition team and as his general counsel after serving one term in the state senate.

Lummis served on Bob Dole's presidential steering committee in Wyoming, a delegate to the 2004 Republican National Convention, meant to give a speech at the 2008 Republican National Convention, served as the chair of Mitt Romney's campaign in Wyoming, and was a campaign surrogate for Rand Paul. She served as the chair of Mary Mead's gubernatorial campaign in 1990, and Ray Hunkins' gubernatorial campaign in 2006. She was elected as Treasurer of Wyoming in 1998, and reelected without opposition in 2002, but was unable to seek reelection due to term limits implemented by legislation that she chose to not constitutionally challenge.

Lummis was elected to succeed Barbara Cubin in the United States House of Representatives in the 2008 election after narrowly defeating Democratic nominee Gary Trauner, but faced less opposition in her other elections. During her tenure in the house she was the first Wyoming representative to serve on the Agriculture committee since 1941, chair of the Science Subcommittee on Energy, served as co-chair of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues, and was active in the Congressional Western Caucus and Freedom Caucus. She served until her retirement in 2017, and was succeeded by Liz Cheney. Following her tenure in the house she considered running for governor in the 2018 Wyoming gubernatorial election and sought a position in President Donald Trump's cabinet as the United States Secretary of the Interior, but declined to run and was not appointed. Lummis unsuccessfully sought to be appointed to replace Senator Craig L. Thomas in 2007, but was elected to the United States Senate in the 2020 election becoming the first woman to represent Wyoming in the United States Senate.

Early life and education

Cynthia Marie Lummis was born on September 10, 1954, in Cheyenne, Wyoming, to Doran Lummis and Enid Bennett. Her brother Del Lummis served as the chair of the Laramie County Republican Party.[2][3][4] She is descended from German immigrants and her family first came to Wyoming in 1868.[5] She graduated from Cheyenne East High School.[6] Lummis graduated from the University of Wyoming with a bachelor of science degree in animal science in 1976, and a bachelor of science in biology in 1978.[7][8] She graduated from the University of Wyoming with a juris doctor in 1985, and was on the dean's list.[9][10] She worked as a student teacher at Rock River School in 1977.[11]

She met Alvin Wiederspahn while both were campaigning during the 1978 election and married on May 28, 1983. Both would later serve in the Wyoming House of Representatives together being one of the few married couples to do so although Lummis was a Republican and Wiederspahn a Democrat.[12][13][14] She remained married to Widerspahn, with whom she had one child, until his death on October 24, 2014.[15]

Lummis has a net worth of $12.26 million as of 2015, but once reported a net worth of between $20 million and $75 million from 2007 to 2008.[16][17] Lummis purchase Bitcoin in 2013, after being told by her son-in-law and later became the first member of the United States Senate to own cryptocurrency.[18]

Career

State legislature

Elections

Lummis was elected to the Wyoming House of Representatives from Laramie County in the 1978 election.[19] Lummis was the youngest woman to serve in the state legislature at the age of twenty-four.[20] She was reelected in the 1980 election, but chose to not seek reelection in 1982.[21][22] Lummis returned to the state house after winning in the 1984 election.[23][24] Lummis filed to run for reelection on June 19, 1986, and won reelection after placing third out of eighteen candidates.[25][26][27] She won reelection in the 1988 and 1990 elections.[28][29] She was reapportioned to the 8th district in 1992.[30]

In 1990, Senator Dan Sullivan, a Republican, resigned from the Wyoming Senate and Senate Majority Leader Diemer True stated that Lummis was qualified to replace Sullivan in the state senate, but was busy serving as a campaign manager in the gubernatorial election.[31] Lummis ran for a seat in the Wyoming Senate from the 5th district, defeated Norman P. Feagler for the Republican nomination, and defeated incumbent Democratic Senator Harriet Elizabeth Byrd in the 1992 election.[32][33][34] During the campaign she had spent $11,661 while Byrd had spent $9,878 making Lummis the fifth-highest spending elected candidate in the 1992 election.[35] On June 8, 1994, Lummis announced that she would not run for reelection stating that she had other commitments to her family and Don Lawler was elected to succeed her.[36][37]

Tenure

During Lummis' tenure in the state house she served as chair of the Revenue committee and on the Judiciary and Agriculture committees.[38][19][39] During her tenure in the state senate she served on the Judiciary committee.[40] After leaving the state legislature she was appointed to serve on Jim Geringer's gubernatorial transition team and was appointed to serve as his general counsel which she served as until 1997.[41][42][43] Geringer appointed Lummis to serve as interim director of the office of State Lands and Investments in 1997, after he fired Jim Magagna.[44]

Representative Wiederspahn was charged with reckless driving after getting into an accident that injured Lummis.[45] She attended the National Conference of State Legislatures national conference in 1982, alongside Senate President Donald Cundall and representatives Widerspahn, Peg Shreve, Scott Ratliff, William A. Cross, and George Salisbury.[46] In 1982, a man voted for Lummis, while she was outside the room during a roll call vote in favor of legislation about the treatment of non-resident traffic offenders. Lummis changed the vote to a nay after coming back in and Representative Ken Burns stated that this was an example of why electronic voting was needed.[47]

During the 1988 Republican presidential primaries she served on Bob Dole's steering committee in Wyoming.[48] A survey of the financial contributors of the Wyoming Republican Party conducted in 1989, showed that Lummis was suggested as a candidate for Secretary of State of Wyoming.[49] She served as Mary Mead's campaign manager during the 1990 gubernatorial election.[50]

Treasurer

Elections

Resutls of the 1998 Wyoming Treasurer election Lummis: .mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Lummis—50-60%   Lummis—60–70%   Lummis—70-80% Loveridge:   Loveridge—50-60%
Resutls of the 1998 Wyoming Treasurer election
Lummis:
  Lummis—50-60%
  Lummis—60–70%
  Lummis—70-80%

Loveridge:
  Loveridge—50-60%

In 1996, Treasurer Stan Smith announced that he would not seek reelection to a fifth term in the 1998 election and Lummis was speculated as a candidate to replace him.[51] Lummis announced at the Laramie County Republican convention on March 28, 1998, that she would run for treasurer and formally announced her campaign on April 20, at a press conference alongside Smith.[52][53] During the campaign the Attorney General ruled that public funds could not be used to send state treasurer candidates to an investment seminar.[54] She won the Republican nomination without opposition and defeated Democratic nominee Charyl Loveridge and Libertarian nominee James Blomquist.[55][56]

Lummis was considered as a possible candidate for the Republican nomination in the 2002 gubernatorial election, but stated that she would not run.[57][58] She announced on April 30, that she would seek reelection as treasurer and was reelected without opposition in the 2002 election.[59][60][61] Nobody had filed to run in the Democratic primary and nobody received twenty-five write-in votes to qualify for the nomination, except for Lummis, making Lummis the only statewide candidate to not face opposition in the 2002 election.[62][63] During the campaign she had raised $9,275 and spent $12,151.[64]

She was limited to two terms as treasurer and did not challenge the constitutionality of the legislation despite the Wyoming Supreme Court having invalidated term limits on state legislators.[65] She endorsed former Speaker Fred Parady to succeed her as treasurer in the 2006 election, but Joseph Meyer won the Republican primary and the general election.[66][67][68]

Tenure

Lummis conducted an accounting change by raising the interest rate on the $100 million in Wyoming banks which reduced Wyoming's expected budget deficit in 1999, by over $5 million.[69] Lummis also planned an one percent increase on the interest yield of Wyoming's $2.6 billion permanent fund which would raise $26 million per year.[70] She served on the Wyoming Board of Land Commissioners alongside Governor Geringer, Secretary of State Meyer, Auditor Max Maxfield, and Superintendent of Public Instruction Judy Catchpole.[71][72] During her tenure the Permanent Mineral Trust Fund rose to over $2 billion for the first time.[73]

She announced a conflict of interest, involving her role as treasurer of Arp and Hammond Hardware Company, in April 2001, which had existed since April 2000, but Lummis claimed only existed since December 2000, with the April 2000 date being erroneous.[74] Lummis and other Republican statewide officials were accused of trying to expand their powers at the expense of Democratic Governor Dave Freudenthal, but denied the claims.[75] Lummis claimed that she were the person responsible for the increase in Wyoming's investments during her tenure as treasurer, but Freudenthal said that no one person could take credit for the increase.[76]

Lummis, as a member of the Wyoming Canvassing Board, voted unanimously alongside the three other members against a recall of the ballots cast in Natrona County during the 2002 United States House of Representatives election. Even though the results in Natrona County could not overturn the statewide results the results in the county would determine which county was placed first on the ballot. Lummis initially supported a recount, but changed her mind about Mary Ann Collins, the Natrona County Clerk, told her that all of the ballots had been counted.[77]

Lummis and all other statewide officials in Wyoming attended the first inauguration of George W. Bush. During the 2004 presidential election she served as one of Wyoming's twenty-eight delegates to the Republican National Convention. She was the only statewide official from Wyoming to attended Bush's second inauguration.[78][79] She served as the chair of Ray Hunkins' campaign during the 2006 gubernatorial election.[80]

United States House of Representatives

Elections

Resutls of the 2008 United States House of Representatives election in Wyoming Lummis:   Lummis—50-60%   Lummis—60–70%   Lummis—70-80% Trauner:   Trauner—40-50%   Trauner—50-60%   Trauner—60-70%
Resutls of the 2008 United States House of Representatives election in Wyoming
Lummis:
  Lummis—50-60%
  Lummis—60–70%
  Lummis—70-80%

Trauner:
  Trauner—40-50%
  Trauner—50-60%
  Trauner—60-70%
Cynthia Lummis in 2009
Cynthia Lummis in 2009
Cynthia Lummis with representatives Eric Cantor and Mary Fallin
Cynthia Lummis with representatives Eric Cantor and Mary Fallin

Representative Barbara Cubin, who Lummis had supported during the 1994 election, announced that she would not run for reelection in the 2008 election.[81][82] Lummis announced on January 2, 2008, that she would run in the election and won the Republican nomination against Mark Gordon, Bill Winney, and Michael Holland.[83][84] During the Republican primary she had challenged her opponents to debates held in all twenty-three counties of Wyoming.[85] A poll conducted from January 18 to 21, showed that Lummis had a favorability rating of 29%, unfavourability rating of 17%, a neutral rating of 24%, and 30% did not recognize her.[86] Tucker Fagan, who later served as her chief of staff, served as Lummis' campaign manager and during the campaign Rachael Seidenschnur, her press secretary, resigned after using a fake name to ask a question to Lummis' opponent.[87][88][89] She defeated Democratic nominee Gary Trauner in the general election.[90] During the campaign Lummis had raised $1,557,312.56 and spent $1,543,875.14 while Trauner had raised $1,672,707.03 and spent $1,716,013.08.[91][92]

Lummis won reelection in the 2010 election against Democratic nominee David Wendt and Libertarian nominee John V. Love after having raised $780,426.42 and spent $754,270.21 compared to Wendt, who had raised $65,708.80 and spent $68,523.39.[93][94][95][96] Lummis announced that she would run for reelection on May 21, 2012, and she won reelection in the 2012 election against Democratic nominee Chris Henrichsen after having raised $715,313.84 and spent $631,025.66.[97][98][99][100] She won reelection in the 2014 election against Democratic nominee Richard Grayson after having raised $432,665.64 and spent $300,949.02.[101][102][103]

She announced on November 12, 2015, that she would not seek reelection in the 2016 election and Liz Cheney was elected to succeed her.[104][105] Lummis' daughter, Annaliese Wiederspahn, served as Leland Christensen's campaign manager during the Republican primary.[106] Lummis considered running for the Republican nomination in the 2018 gubernatorial election, declined to run and instead endorsed Sam Galeotos.[107][108] Lummis sought a position in President Donald Trump's cabinet by attempting to replace Ryan Zinke as United States Secretary of the Interior, but David Bernhardt was appointed instead.[109][110]

Tenure

During Lummis' tenure in the house she served on the Agriculture and Appropriations committee and on the Energy and Mineral Resources, National Parks, Forests and Public Lands, and Energy and Water Development subcommittees. She was the first representative from Wyoming to serve on the Agriculture committee since Frank O. Horton served on the committee from 1939 to 1941.[111][112][113][114] In 2011, she was appointed to serve as vice-chair of the Approprations subcommittee of the Agriculture committee.[115] Lummis left the Appropriations committee in 2013, and stated that she had requested her removal from the committee and that it was not involved with a purge of radical Republicans from committee positions.[116] She was appointed to serve as chair of the Science Subcommittee on Energy in 2013.[117]

She served as the communications chair and spokesperson of the Congressional Western Caucus and succeeded Dean Heller as vice-chair in 2011, following Heller's appointment to the United States Senate.[118][119][120] Lummis was elected to serve on the House Republican Steering Committee in 2010.[113] She was at one point the only female member of the Freedom Caucus.[121] Lummis served as co-chair of the Congressional Caucus for Women's Issues alongside Democratic Representative Gwen Moore from 2011 to 2013.[122] She was also a member of the Tea Party Caucus.[123]

Lummis supported Speaker John Boehner while the Freedom Caucus successfully pushed to remove Boehner.[124] She praised the election of Paul Ryan as Speaker stating that "we have ushered in thoughtful, conservative leadership, restored member-driven policy-making to the legislative process and returned regular order that will bring sunshine to back rooms making government work better".[125]

Lummis served on the Republican whp team until she was removed from the position in 2015, due to her voting against giving President Barack Obama the authority to propose a trade agreement with Pacific countries. She stated that she knew she would be removed from her position on the whip team due to her vote, but did not regret her vote. Representatives Steve Pearce and Trent Franks were also removed from the whip team due to their votes.[126]

During the 2008 presidential election Lummis was meant to give a speech at the Republican National Convention on the first day, but her speech was cancelled due to Hurricane Gustav.[127] During the 2012 Republican presidential primaries she endorsed Mitt Romney and served as the chair of Romney's campaign in Wyoming.[128][129] During the 2016 Republican presidential primaries she was a campaign surrogate for Rand Paul and later endorsed Donald Trump in the presidential election.[130][131]

United States Senate

Elections

Senator Craig L. Thomas died on June 4, 2007, and Lummis announced on June 12, that she would seek an appointment to replace Thomas.[132] She placed third in the final vote making her one of the nominees submitted to the governor as a candidate for appointment alongside John Barrasso and Tom Sansonetti.[133][134] Freudenthal selected Barrasso to replace Thomas.[135] Lummis was speculated as a possible candidate in the 2014 United States Senate election.[136]

Lummis filed on June 20, 2019, to run for a seat in the United States Senate to succeed retiring Senator Mike Enzi.[137] She won the Republican nomination and defeated Democratic nominee Merav Ben-David in the general election.[138][139] Her victory made her the first woman to represent Wyoming in the United States Senate.[140] She raised more during the campaign than all of her Republican and Democratic opponents combined.[141] During the campaign Lummis had raised $3,003,787.92 and spent $3,037,813.16 while Ben-David had raised $559,626.26 and spent $545,348.26.[142][143]

Tenure

During Lummis' tenure in the United States Senate she served on the Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, Environment and Public Works, and Commerce, Science, and Transportation committees.[144]

During the counting of the electoral college vote of the 2020 presidential election Lummis voted in favor certifying the results from Arizona, but against certifying the results from Pennsylvania.[145][146] Lummis voted to acquit Trump during his second impeachment trial.[147]

Political positions

Abortion

Cynthia Lummis in 2011
Cynthia Lummis in 2011

Lummis co-sponsored legislation in the state house to allow for state Medicaid funding to be used for abortions when the life of the mother was at risk.[148] The Wyoming Right to Choose political action committee reported that Lummis was pro-choice after she completed a questionnaire during the 1990 election and the organization endorsed her during the 1992 election.[149][150] Lummis stated in the 1990s that abortion was a sin, but that it should not be illegal as an individual was in a better position to evaluate their circumstances instead of the state.[151]

Lummis cosponsored and voted in favor for legislation in the house in 2015, to defund Planned Parenthood.[152] The National Right to Life Committee endorsed Lummis during the 2020 election and gave her a 100% anti-abortion rating during her tenure in the United States House of Representatives. She supported the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act.[153] Lummis was given a 0% rating by NARAL Pro-Choice America in 2016.[154]

Economics

Lummis supported the federal takeover of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, but stated that the government should avoid bailing out private companies.[155] Lummis supported the privization of Social Security, raising the age at which people received Social Security money, and making the Bush tax cuts permanent.[156][157][158] She voted against the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.[159]

In 2010, the house voted 228 to 192, with Lummis in favor, to prohibit federal funding for NPR.[160] Lummis stated that Democratic member of Congress had a "cocaine-like addiction" to spending.[161] Lummis voted against the Hurricane Sandy relief bill stating that although victims of Hurricane Sandy deserved the money the federal government should cut its budget to offset the cost of the relief legislation.[162]

Lummis supported the creation of federal legislation to allow private insurance companies to from interstate insurance pools.[163] The United States House of Representatives voted 220 to 215, with Lummis against, in favor of the Affordable Care Act.[164]

Energy and climate change

Lummis supports the development of nuclear power and oil drilling in Alaska.[165] During the 2012 campaign Lummis stated that climate change was not settled during a debate.[117]

Equality

Lummis stated in 1979, that it was "important to me to see Equal Rights Amendment not rescinded".[19] She and Representative Carolyn Maloney led an effort in 2015, to pass the Equal Rights Amendment again.[166] In 2013, the house voted 286 to 138, with Lummis against, in favor of the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.[167] She and Senator Chris Van Hollen attempted to have a federal building Cheyenne named after Louisa Swain, the first woman to to vote in the United States.[168]

Lummis voted against the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, named after Matthew Shepard who were murdered in an anti-gay hate crime, stating that she believed that hate crime legislation was "a state's rights issue".[169][170] Lummis voted against the repeal of don't ask, don't tell and co-sponsored the State Marriage Defense Act.[171] Following the Supreme Court ruling in Obergefell v. Hodges, which legalized gay marriage in the United States, Lummis supported the First Amendment Defense Act to protect religious groups that opposed gay marriage.[172] Lummis opposes gay marriage and believes that it "should be left to the states" and was "disappointed" with the Supreme Court's ruling.[173]

Foreign policy

Lummis supported continuing the United States' occupation of Iraq and that soldiers should not be withdrawn from Iraq until General David Petraeus stated that was time to leave. She supported the surge of soldiers in Iraq.[174] Lummis was one of four Republicans on the Agriculture committee who voted in favor of legislation which would have lifted the travel ban on Americans and agricultural products to and from Cuba.[175] Lummis opposed American involvement in the Syrian civil war stating that the civil war "should be dealt with by the Arab world" and that she did not see how "getting involved in another open-ended and costly conflict is in the best interest of America".[176][177]

Gun rights

She received an A rating from the National Rifle Association during the 2008 campaign.[178] In 2009, the house voted 279 to 147, with Lummis in favor, in favor of legislation allowing people to bring loaded guns into national parks and wildlife refuges.[179]

Electoral history

Cynthia Lummis electoral history
1986 Wyoming House of Representatives Laramie County Republican primary[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 6,837 15.54%
Republican Ellen Crowley 6,521 14.82%
Republican Bill McIlvain 6,338 14.40%
Republican April Brimmer Kunz 6,173 14.03%
Republican Gary Yordy 5,682 12.91%
Republican Mary Jean McDowell Baker 4,480 10.18%
Republican Ronald G. Pretty 4,128 9.38%
Republican Lou Mandis 3,850 8.75%
Total votes 44,009 100.00%
1986 Wyoming House of Representatives Laramie County election[27]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Democratic Harriet Elizabeth Byrd (incumbent) 14,985 8.39%
Democratic Lynn Birleffi 13,849 7.75%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 12,519 7.01%
Democratic Guy Cameron 12,416 6.95%
Democratic Steve Freudenthal 12,103 6.78%
Democratic Shirley Humphrey 11,817 6.62%
Democratic Mary Kay Schwope 11,243 6.29%
Republican Bill McIlvain (incumbent) 10,874 6.09%
Republican Ellen Crowley 10,710 6.00%
Republican Gary Yordy 10,619 5.95%
Republican April Brimmer Kunz 10,604 5.94%
Democratic Robert Larson 8,386 4.70%
Democratic Carolyn G. Johnson 7,959 4.46%
Democratic Charles A. Hunter 6,806 3.81%
Republican Ben Zavorka 6,522 3.65%
Republican Lou Mandis 5,969 3.34%
Republican Ron G. Pretty 5,752 3.22%
Republican Mary Jean McDowell Baker 5,475 3.07%
Total votes 178,608 100.00%
1992 Wyoming Senate 5th Republican primary[33]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 1,720 75.64%
Republican Norman P. Feagler 554 24.36%
Total votes 2,274 100.00%
1992 Wyoming Senate 5th election[34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 3,434 52.86%
Democratic Harriet Elizabeth Byrd (incumbent) 3,062 47.14%
Total votes 6,496 100.00%
1998 Wyoming Treasurer election[56]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 105,332 62.69%
Democratic Charyl Loveridge 52,655 31.34%
Libertarian James Blomquist 10,024 5.97%
Total votes 168,011 100.00%
2002 Wyoming Treasurer Republican primary[60]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 75,169 100.00%
Total votes 75,169 100.00%
2002 Wyoming Treasurer election[61]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 152,583 100.00% +37.31%
Total votes 152,583 100.00%
2007 United States Senate candidate selection final vote[133]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Tom Sansonetti 58 27.23%
Republican John Barrasso 56 26.29%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 44 20.66%
Republican Matt Mead 30 14.08%
Republican Ron Micheli 25 11.74%
Total votes 213 100.00%
2008 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district Republican primary[84]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 33,149 46.24%
Republican Mark Gordon 26,827 37.42%
Republican Bill Winney 8,537 11.91%
Republican Michael Holland 3,171 4.42%
Total votes 71,684 100.00%
2008 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district election[90]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 131,244 52.62%
Democratic Gary Trauner 106,758 42.81%
Libertarian W. David Herbert 11,030 4.42%
Independent Write-ins 363 0.15%
Total votes 249,395 100.00%
Overvotes 180
Undervotes 6,458
2010 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district Republican primary[93]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 84,063 82.82% +36.58%
Republican Evan Liam Slafter 17,148 16.89% +16.89%
Republican Write-ins 289 0.28% +0.28%
Total votes 101,500 100.00%
Overvotes 49
Undervotes 5,421
2010 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district election[94]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 131,661 70.42% +17.80%
Democratic David Wendt 45,768 24.48% -18.33%
Libertarian John V. Love 9,253 4.95% +0.53%
Independent Write-ins 287 0.15% +0.00%
Total votes 186,969 100.00%
Overvotes 188
Undervotes 3,665
2012 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district Republican primary[98]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 73,153 98.13% +15.31%
Republican Write-ins 1,393 1.87% +1.59%
Total votes 74,546 100.00%
Overvotes 8
Undervotes 9,862
2012 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district election[99]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 166,452 68.89% -1.53%
Democratic Chris Henrichsen 57,573 23.83% -0.65%
Libertarian Richard Brubaker 8,442 3.49% -1.46%
Constitution Daniel Clyde Cummings 4,963 2.05% +2.05%
Wyoming Country Don Wills 3,775 1.56% +1.56%
Independent Write-ins 416 0.17% +0.02%
Total votes 241,621 100.00%
Overvotes 600
Undervotes 8,479
2014 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district Republican primary[101]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 70,918 75.89% -22.24%
Republican Jason Adam Senteney 22,251 23.81% +23.81%
Republican Write-ins 274 0.29% +1.58%
Total votes 93,443 100.00%
Overvotes 50
Undervotes 5,820
2014 United States House of Representatives at-large congressional district election[102]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis (incumbent) 113,038 68.47% -0.42%
Democratic Richard Grayson 37,803 22.90% -0.93%
Libertarian Richard Brubaker 7,112 4.31% +0.82%
Constitution Daniel Clyde Cummings 6,749 4.09% +2.04%
Independent Write-ins 398 0.24% +0.07%
Total votes 165,100 100.00%
Overvotes 370
Undervotes 5,683
2020 United States Senate Republican primary in Wyoming[138]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 63,511 59.67%
Republican Robert Short 13,473 12.66%
Republican Bryan Miller 10,946 10.28%
Republican Donna Rice 5,881 5.53%
Republican R. Mark Armstrong 3,904 3.67%
Republican Joshua Wheeler 3,763 3.54
Republican John Holtz 1,820 1.71%
Republican Devon Cade 1,027 0.96%
Republican Michael Kemler 985 0.93%
Republican Star Roselli 627 0.59%
Republican Write-ins 501 0.47%
Total votes 106,438 100.00%
Overvotes 391
Undervotes 3,746
2020 United States Senate election in Wyoming[139]
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
Republican Cynthia Lummis 198,100 72.85%
Democratic Merav Ben-David 72,766 26.76%
Independent Write-ins 1,071 0.39%
Total votes 271,937 100.00%
Overvotes 165
Undervotes 6,401

See also

References

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External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Barbara Cubin
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Wyoming's at-large congressional district

2009–2017
Succeeded by
Liz Cheney
Preceded by
Jan Schakowsky
Chair of the Congressional Women's Caucus
2011–2013
Succeeded by
Jaime Herrera Beutler
Party political offices
Preceded by
Mike Enzi
Republican nominee for U.S. Senator from Wyoming
(Class 2)

2020
Most recent
U.S. Senate
Preceded by
Mike Enzi
U.S. Senator (Class 2) from Wyoming
2021–present
Served alongside: John Barrasso
Incumbent
U.S. order of precedence (ceremonial)
Preceded by
Ben Ray Luján
United States senators by seniority
93rd
Succeeded by
Roger Marshall
This page was last edited on 26 July 2021, at 22:44
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