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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

A cuban prime (from the role cubes (third powers) play in the equations) is a prime number that is a solution to one of two different specific equations involving third powers of x and y. The first of these equations is:

[1]

and the first few cuban primes from this equation are:

7, 19, 37, 61, 127, 271, 331, 397, 547, 631, 919, 1657, 1801, 1951, 2269, 2437, 2791, 3169, 3571, 4219, 4447, 5167, 5419, 6211, 7057, 7351, 8269, 9241, ... (sequence A002407 in the OEIS)

The general cuban prime of this kind can be rewritten as , which simplifies to . This is exactly the general form of a centered hexagonal number; that is, all of these cuban primes are centered hexagonal.

As of January 2006 the largest known has 65537 digits with ,[2] found by Jens Kruse Andersen.

The second of these equations is:

[3]

This simplifies to .

The first few cuban primes of this form are (sequence A002648 in the OEIS):

13, 109, 193, 433, 769, 1201, 1453, 2029, 3469, 3889, 4801, 10093, 12289, 13873, 18253, 20173, 21169, 22189, 28813, 37633, 43201, 47629, 60493, 63949, 65713, 69313

With a substitution , the equations above can also be written as follows:

.
.

Generalization

A generalized cuban prime is a prime of the form

In fact, these are all the primes of the form 3k+1.

See also

Notes

  1. ^ Cunningham, On quasi-Mersennian numbers
  2. ^ Caldwell, Prime Pages
  3. ^ Cunningham, Binomial Factorisations, Vol. 1, pp. 245-259

References

  • Caldwell, Dr. Chris K. (ed.), "The Prime Database: 3*100000845^8192 + 3*100000845^4096 + 1", Prime Pages, University of Tennessee at Martin, retrieved June 2, 2012
  • Phil Carmody, Eric W. Weisstein and Ed Pegg, Jr. "Cuban Prime". MathWorld.CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  • Cunningham, A. J. C. (1923), Binomial Factorisations, London: F. Hodgson, ASIN B000865B7S
  • Cunningham, A. J. C. (1912), "On Quasi-Mersennian Numbers", Messenger of Mathematics, England: Macmillan and Co., 41, pp. 119–146
This page was last edited on 9 August 2019, at 11:55
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