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Crazy Over Horses

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Crazy Over Horses
Crazy Over Horses FilmPoster.jpeg
Directed byWilliam Beaudine
Written byTim Ryan
Produced byJerry Thomas
StarringLeo Gorcey
Huntz Hall
David Gorcey
William Benedict
CinematographyMarcel LePicard
Edited byWilliam Austin
Music byEdward J. Kay
Production
company
Distributed byMonogram Pictures
Release date
  • November 18, 1951 (1951-11-18) (U.S.)
Running time
65 minutes
CountryUnited States
LanguageEnglish

Crazy Over Horses is a 1951 comedy film starring The Bowery Boys.[1] The film was released on November 18, 1951 by Monogram Pictures and is the twenty-fourth film in the series.

Plot

Louie is owed money by a stable-owner and sends Slip and the boys over to collect the debt. They return with a horse, My Girl, as payment. Local gangsters want the horse and switch their horse, Tarzana, for the gang's horse. They boys discover the ruse and the horses are switched several more times.

After the boys finally procure the real My Girl, Sach races her against Tarzana (the gangster's horse) and several others, ending with a photo finish in which My Girl beats Tarzana by a tongue. The gangsters quickly try to leave town before their boss finds them.

Cast

The Bowery Boys

Remaining cast

Production

This was the first film that David Gorcey was credited under using his mother's maiden name, Condon.[1] It is also the return of Bennie Bartlett to the gang.

This was also the last appearance of William Benedict in the series. Benedict's reason for leaving the series was that "I suddenly decided I had enough, and it was getting a little rough doing 'em - emotionally. There was a lot of infighting going on and I said, 'I don't need this'".[2]

Home media

Warner Archives released the film on made-to-order DVD in the United States as part of "The Bowery Boys, Volume One" on November 23, 2012.

References

  1. ^ a b Hayes, David (1984). The Films of the Bowery Boys. Secaucus, NJ: The Citadel Press. ISBN 978-0806509310.
  2. ^ Getz, Leonard (2004). From Broadway to the Bowery. Jefferson NC: McFarland and Company, Inc.

External links

Preceded by 'The Bowery Boys' movies
1946-1958
Succeeded by


This page was last edited on 5 February 2022, at 16:17
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