To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Corvette Stingray (concept car)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Corvette Stingray Racer is a privately funded concept car that formed a basis for the second generation (C2) Corvette Stingray. The Stingray Racer was designed by Pete Brock, the youngest designer to work at GM at that time, Bill Mitchell, GM Vice President of styling, and Larry Shinoda in 1959. The Stingray still exists today with a 327-cubic-inch (5.4 L), fuel-injected V-8 producing 375 hp (280 kW).

Corvette SS predecessor

Chevrolet Corvette SS at the Indianapolis Speedway Museum
Chevrolet Corvette SS at the Indianapolis Speedway Museum

The 1957 Corvette SS was a racing sports car created by a team of engineers headed by Zora Arkus-Duntov as part of an official Chevrolet race effort meant to culminate with the 24 Hours of Le Mans. Soon after its race debut at the 12 Hours of Sebring, where it retired after 23 laps, the Automobile Manufacturers Association (AMA) banned manufacturer-sponsored racing, and the SS was relegated to test track duty. Mitchell bought the Corvette SS development mule and used its chassis as the basis for the new car.

Design and development of the 1959 Corvette XP-87 Stingray Racer

The Stingray used elements of the still-born Q-Corvette design study as well as the SS underpinnings, featuring a 92-inch (2,337 mm) wheelbase. The new car was exceptionally light, with a dry weight of 2,200 lb (998 kg), nearly 1,000 lb (450 kg) lighter than a 1960 production car. Its fuel-injected small-block 283-cubic-inch (4.6 L) V-8 engine produced 315 horsepower (235 kW) at 6,200 rpm. The Stingray body design strongly influenced the styling of the next generation Corvette, which saw production as a 1963 model. It also was a test bed for many technical developments, including the four-speed manual transmission, extensive use of aluminum and a De Dion rear suspension.

Operational history

Billed as a car "built to test handling ease and performance," Mitchell arranged to race the car quite extensively. In the hands of Dr. Dick Thompson, it made its debut at Maryland's Marlboro Motor Raceway on 18 April 1959, finishing in fourth place. It went on to win an SCCA National Championship in 1960.

1959 Corvette XP-87 Stingray Racer on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California in July 2016.
1959 Corvette XP-87 Stingray Racer on display at the Peterson Automotive Museum in Los Angeles, California in July 2016.

The Stingray was then retired from racing and modified by Mitchell with, among other things, a passenger seat added. The modified vehicle was exhibited as an experimental show car even while Mitchell regularly drove it personally on weekends. After its career as a concept car was finished, it was retained by the GM Design Studio as a historically significant vehicle.

Specifications

1957 Stingray Racer

  • Frame:Space frame
  • Body: Fiberglass
  • Engine location: Front
  • Drive type: Rear wheel
  • Weight: 2,204 lb (1,000 kg)
  • Engine
    • Engine configuration: V
    • Cylinders: 8
    • Aspiration/Induction: Normal
    • Displacement: 283.00 in³ | 4638 cc
    • Valvetrain: OHV
    • Power: 315 hp (235 kW) @ 6200 rpm
    • Torque: 295.00 ft·lbf (400 N·m) @ 4700 rpm
    • Power-to-weight ratio: 7.0 lb/hp
    • Power-to-volume ratio: 68.5 bhp/L
    • Bore: 3.87 in | 98.3 mm
    • Stroke: 3.00 in | 76.2 mm
    • Compression Ratio: 11.0:1

2009 Stingray Concept

50th Anniversary Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Concept at the 2009 Dubai International Motor Show.
50th Anniversary Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Concept at the 2009 Dubai International Motor Show.

Also referred to as the Corvette Centennial, the 50th Anniversary Stingray show car debuted at the Chicago Auto Show in February 2009. A version of the model was first shown at the 2009 Chicago Auto Show and stars as Sideswipe in Transformers: Dark of the Moon.

The Corvette Stingray Concept was developed as an internal design challenge to combine classic Corvette cues with surprisingly high-tech features, modern materials, and a striking new appearance. The car is well-appointed with a clamshell hood, scissor-style doors, ergonomic seats, rear-view camera with night vision enhancement, and a high performance hybrid drive. Interactive touch controls allow the driver to customize the power and efficiency of his or her ride and share it with friends via the in-car camera system and advanced telemetrics.[1]

In popular culture

The two-seater version appeared as the private car of Elvis Presley's oil tycoon character in the 1967 film Clambake.

The car was featured in Season 6 of Mad Men.

See also

References

  • Friedman, Dave and Paddock, Lowell C. Corvette Grand Sport: Photographic Race Log of the Magnificent Chevrolet Corvette Factory Specials 1987-1998. St. Paul, Minnesota: MBI Publishing Co., 1989. ISBN 0-87938-382-8.
  • Mueller, Mike. Corvette Milestones. St. Paul, Minnesota: MBI Publishing Co., 1996. ISBN 0-7603-0095-X.
  • Nichols, Richard. Corvette: 1953 to the Present. London: Bison Books, 1985. ISBN 0-86124-218-1.
  1. ^ Chevrolet press release

External links

This page was last edited on 13 September 2019, at 16:46
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.