To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

XB-53
XA-44.jpg
1946 design then designated XA-44
Role Attack aircraft
Manufacturer Convair
First flight n/a
Status Cancelled in 1949
Primary user United States Air Force
Number built 0

The Convair XB-53 was a proposed jet-powered medium bomber aircraft, designed by Convair for the United States Army Air Forces.[1] With a radical tailless, forward-swept wing design, the aircraft appeared futuristic; however, the project was canceled before either of the two prototypes were completed.[1]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/5
    Views:
    4 983
    5 984
    310
    13 979
    258 492
  • ✪ Consolidated Vultee XB-53 Forward Swept Wing Design Test 1947 NACA Langley Research Center
  • ✪ Convair XB-46 First Flight, April 2, 1947
  • ✪ Convair B-58 Hustler Bomber Wind Tunnel Tests ~1954 NACA; B-58A Model in Supersonic Pressure Tunnel
  • ✪ B-47E Major Aircraft Accident 1955 USAF; Marilyn Monroe Ending
  • ✪ Convair B-36 Peacemaker History

Transcription

Contents

Design and development

The project was originally designated XA-44 in 1945 under the old "attack" category. An unusual forward-swept wing-design powered by three J35-GE turbojets, the project was developed in parallel with Convair's XB-46. The original design had a wing with a 12° forward-sweep and a solid nose section, but when the Army Air Force revamped the advanced attack aircraft requirement into a light bomber requirement in 1946, the aircraft was redesignated XB-53 and the wing redesigned with a 30° forward-sweep and 8° dihedral that was borrowed from German wartime research, but also a glazed nose section. The swept-forward configuration would give the aircraft a greater climb rate and maneuverability.[2][3] It looked promising enough at one point for the Army Air Force to consider canceling the XB-46 in favor of the XA-44, since there was not enough funding for both.[1]

Classified as a medium bomber, the XB-53 would have carried up to 12,000 pounds of bombs as well as 40 High Velocity Aerial Rockets (HVAR) mounted on underwing pylons.[1]

Convair argued for completion of the XB-46 prototype as a flying testbed, without armament and other equipment, and with the substitution of two XA-44s for the other two B-46 airframes on contract. The Air Force ratified this in June 1946 but the project did not progress, nor were additional B-46s built. The XB-53 program was reinstated in February 1949 but only for a short while.

Specifications (XB-53 estimated)

Data from [4]

General characteristics

  • Crew: four
  • Length: 79 ft 5 in (24.2 m)
  • Wingspan: 80 ft 9 in (24.6 m)
  • Height: 23 ft 8 in (7.22 m)
  • Wing area: 1,370 sq ft (127 m2)
  • Empty weight: 31,760 lb (14,406 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 60,000 lb (27,216 kg)
  • Powerplant: 3 × Allison J35 turbojets, 4,000 lbf (18 kN) thrust each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 504 kn; 933 km/h (580 mph)
  • Range: 1,738 nmi; 3,219 km (2,000 mi)
  • Service ceiling: 44,000 ft (13,000 m)

Armament

  • Bombs: 12,000 lb (5,443 kg)

See also

Related lists

References

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d "Fact sheet: Convair XB-53." National Museum of the US Air Force. Retrieved: 9 July 2017.
  2. ^ Buttler, Tony (2010). American Secret Projects: Bombers, Attack and Anti-Submarine Aircraft 1945 to 1974. Hinckley, England: Midland Publishing. ISBN 978-1-85780-331-0.
  3. ^ Bradley, Robert, 2013. Convair Advanced Designs II: Secret Fighters, Attack Aircraft, and Unique Concepts 1929-1973. Manchester, England: Crécy Publishing. ISBN 978-0-8597917-0-0.
  4. ^ Jones 1974, p. 1980–1982.

Bibliography

  • Andrade, John M. U.S. Military Aircraft Designations and Serials since 1909. Earl Shilton, Leicester: Midland Counties Publications, 1979. ISBN 0-904597-22-9.
  • Jones, Lloyd S. U.S. Bombers, B-1 1928 to B-1 1980s. Fallbrook, California: Aero Publishers, 1962, second edition 1974. ISBN 0-8168-9126-5.
  • Knaack, Marcelle Size. Encyclopedia of U.S. Air Force Aircraft and Missile Systems, Volume II – Post-World War II Bombers 1945–1973. Washington, D.C.: Office of Air Force History, USAF, 1988. ISBN 0-912799-59-5.
  • Wagner, Ray. American Combat Planes – Second Edition. Garden City, New York: Doubleday and Company, 1968. ISBN 0-370-00094-3.

External links

This page was last edited on 13 December 2018, at 10:19
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.