To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Circle Hot Springs, Alaska

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Circle Hot Springs, Alaska
Circle Hot Springs, Alaska is located in Alaska
Circle Hot Springs, Alaska
Circle Hot Springs, Alaska
Coordinates: 65°29′00″N 144°38′03″W / 65.48333°N 144.63417°W / 65.48333; -144.63417
CountryUnited States
StateAlaska
Census AreaYukon-Koyukuk
Government
 • State senatorClick Bishop (R)
 • State rep.Dave Talerico (R)
Elevation
906 ft (276 m)
Time zoneUTC-9 (Alaska (AKST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-8 (AKDT)
ZIP code
99730
Area code(s)907
GNIS feature ID1416507[1]

Circle Hot Springs is a hot spring and an unincorporated community in the Yukon-Koyukuk Census Area of Alaska in the United States. The community is home to a hot spring and is the site of the now-closed Arctic Circle Hot Springs resort.[2] The hot spring can be accessed either by automobile via the Steese Highway or by plane via the small-scale Circle Hot Springs Airport. The area surrounding the hot spring is rich in mining history and retains a certain degree of mystery and folklore.

Geography

Circle Hot Springs is located at 65°29' N, 144°38' W.[3] Central, Alaska is the nearest community, located 8 miles east of the hot spring. Fairbanks, Alaska is 131 miles SW on the Steese Highway.

Climate

Circle Hot Springs has a continental subarctic climate (Köppen Dfc).

Climate data for Circle Hot Springs
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 49
(9)
51
(11)
51
(11)
68
(20)
90
(32)
94
(34)
94
(34)
88
(31)
78
(26)
71
(22)
51
(11)
45
(7)
94
(34)
Average high °F (°C) −10.4
(−23.6)
−2.9
(−19.4)
12.2
(−11.0)
36.9
(2.7)
57.1
(13.9)
70.1
(21.2)
71.1
(21.7)
65.2
(18.4)
50.8
(10.4)
26.4
(−3.1)
4.9
(−15.1)
−4.4
(−20.2)
31.4
(−0.3)
Average low °F (°C) −25.4
(−31.9)
−20.4
(−29.1)
−12
(−24)
11.7
(−11.3)
31.1
(−0.5)
43.8
(6.6)
47.6
(8.7)
42.5
(5.8)
30.2
(−1.0)
12.4
(−10.9)
−9.2
(−22.9)
−19.7
(−28.7)
11.1
(−11.6)
Record low °F (°C) −60
(−51)
−57
(−49)
−44
(−42)
−26
(−32)
−8
(−22)
27
(−3)
25
(−4)
20
(−7)
−5
(−21)
−28
(−33)
−51
(−46)
−60
(−51)
−60
(−51)
Average precipitation inches (mm) 0.52
(13)
0.31
(7.9)
0.26
(6.6)
0.44
(11)
0.7
(18)
1.92
(49)
2.17
(55)
1.79
(45)
1.19
(30)
0.92
(23)
0.45
(11)
0.48
(12)
11.15
(283)
Average snowfall inches (cm) 7.7
(20)
5.8
(15)
5
(13)
5.2
(13)
0.6
(1.5)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
2.2
(5.6)
12.9
(33)
8.6
(22)
7.8
(20)
55.7
(141)
Average precipitation days 7 7 6 5 8 12 14 13 11 11 9 8 111
Source: [4]

History

William Greats first recorded the hot spring in 1893, but it had been used previously by the indigenous Athabascan inhabitants. Franklin Leach homesteaded 160 acres of the area around the hot springs in 1905 and started construction on a resort sometime thereafter.[3]

Circle City, now referred to as just Circle, (41.2 miles NE of Circle Hot Springs) was originally a mining supply town that was established in 1893. Circle Hot Springs was established by L. N. Jack McQuesten in 1887. The trading post in Circle and its surrounding vicinity were thought to have been on the Arctic Circle, despite that latitudinal marker being 40 miles to the north. Circle-area gold was a huge draw for prospectors, who sought out the remote area in search of their fortunes. Some prospectors even came to use Circle Hot Springs as a haven from the harsh interior Alaska winters.[5] Mining interest in the area decreased drastically after gold was found in the Klondike in 1897, and then in Nome in 1899.[6] A limited number of miners stayed in the area near Circle Hot Spring after the turn of the century, and gold mining continues to be an attraction to this day.

The "Circle Springs" post office was established in 1924.[5] Hoping to attract Fairbanks residents, in addition to local miners, the resort owner Frank Leach built a 1600 foot landing strip. Noel Wien made the inaugural landing there in 1924. [7] It was not until March 1930 that construction on a hotel began, due to local roads being unreliable.[5] The population of the resort was 17 in 1930; 14 in 1939; and 36 in 1958. [3]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
193017
194014−17.6%
199029
U.S. Decennial Census[8]

Circle Hot Springs first appeared on the 1930 U.S. Census as an unincorporated village. It appeared again on the 1940 census. It did not appear again until 1990 when it was called Circle Hot Springs Station CDP (census-designated place). Beginning in 2000, it was merged into Central CDP.

Attractions

Although the Arctic Circle Hot Springs resort is now closed for business, the area still sees a handful of visitors throughout the year seeking a dip in the abandoned hot springs, on a quest to spot the northern lights, or in search of undiscovered pockets of gold. The resort is also considered a paranormal destination by many ghost hunters in the interior. Ray Bonnell, a Fairbanks Daily Newsminer writer noted in a 2013 article that:

"In its heyday Circle Hot Springs attracted visitors from all over Alaska and beyond, and was well-known for its aurora viewing. The hotel supposedly even has its own ghost. Some employees are reported to have seen or felt the specter of Emma Leach [wife of Franklin Leach] roaming the halls or haunting the kitchen"[5]

Ron Wendt, another author and paranormal enthusiast, has written about the spooky nature of the hot springs in his book Haunted Alaska. In one section he relates his personal experiences as a child at the hot springs:

"I can attest to the creakiness and the air of mystery in these ancient abodes. But youngsters often see this sort of thing as fun— never realizing that someone might be watching. We never met a ghost, but as I learned later, not everyone can say that."[9]

References

  1. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  2. ^ "Arctic Circle Hot Springs". Fairbanks-Alaska.com. Retrieved 2009-04-25.
  3. ^ a b c Orth, Donald J. Dictionary of Alaska Place Names. U.S Government Printing Office, 1967. pg 219
  4. ^ "CIRCLE HOT SPRINGS, AK (501987)". Western Regional Climate Center. Retrieved November 19, 2015.
  5. ^ a b c d "A Haunting End to Life Around Circle Hot Springs" Fairbanks Daily Newsminer, Posted: Sunday, Jan 6, 2013 2:45 am | Updated: 12:02 pm, Mon Jan 7, 2013. | Accessed: 7:17pm, Sun Dec 14, 2014.
  6. ^ Stone, Thomas. "Flux and Authority in a Subarctic Society: The Yukon Miners in the Nineteenth Century," Ethnohistory Vol. 30, No. 4 (Autumn, 1983) pg 204
  7. ^ Harkey, Ira (1991). Pioneer Bush Pilot. Bantam Books. p. 108. ISBN 0553289195.
  8. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". Census.gov. Retrieved June 6, 2013.
  9. ^ Wendt, Ron. Haunted Alaska. Epicenter Press, 2002. pg 28
This page was last edited on 30 December 2020, at 13:52
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.