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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

CinemaScore
Private company
IndustryMarketing research
Founded1979; 40 years ago (1979)
FounderEd Mintz
Headquarters,
U.S.
ProductsMovies ratings
Websitewww.cinemascore.com

CinemaScore is a market research firm based in Las Vegas. It surveys film audiences to rate their viewing experiences with letter grades, reports the results, and forecasts box office receipts based on the data.

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Transcription

So I have a question for you. Off the top of your head could you sing any music from Star Wars ? How about James Bond ? Harry Potter ? My last question : can you sing anything from a Marvel movie ? I'm like the biggest Marvel fan that I know and I just... I can't think of any of the songs. - No. - No... I should know this, but I don't. Shit. I didn't know they have, like, theme songs. Why is this ? Because the Marvel cinematic universe is now the highest-grossing franchise in film history. More than Star Wars, more than James Bond, more than Harry Potter, so what is missing from their music ? The first problem is that most of the music doesn't evoke an emotional response. Take a look at this scene from the first Ironman : <i>Day 11. Test 37. Configuration 2.0</i> <i>For lack of a better option Dummy is still on fire safety.</i> <i>If you douse me again and I'm not on fire, I'm donating you to a city college.</i> <i>All right, nice and easy. </i> It's kind of hard to hear it. So let's try that one more time, But this time with just the music isolated. Did you have an emotional reaction to that music ? So what happens to the scene if we just take it out ? <i>Day 11. Test 37. Configuration 2.0</i> <i>For lack of a better option Dummy is still on fire safety.</i> <i>If you douse me again and I'm not on fire, I'm donating you to a city college.</i> <i>All right, nice and easy. </i> The scene works just fine and it doesn't need any other sound. And that's partially why you forget the music. it's like the air conditioner in the background, after awhile you tune it out. Another problem is that the music is used very predictably. So that what you see is what you get. If you see something funny you hear funny music. If you see something sad, you hear a high note on the strings. This is a really safe way to score a film, because all of the emotions are expected. The music just tells you the same thing as the picture. If someone looks scared, then you hear : And this is the second reason the music is forgettable. It never challenges your expectations. But sometimes the Marvel films do have memorable music, except the filmmakers don't let us listen to it. Instead they cover it up with other sounds like this : <i>Denied enlistment due to poor health,</i> <i>Steven Rogers was chosen for a program unique in the annals of American warfare,</i> <i>one that would transform him into the world's first super soldier.</i> That narrator is just telling us things we already know, And he distracts us from the emotion of the scene. So how does this moment play without that distraction ? Did you feel the difference ? Film music is incredibly subjective and it goes through trends. And over the last 20 years there has been a cultural shift. Nowadays a lot of filmmakers feel that music should not be noticed, <i>That's a contemporary thing that I've heard very frequently, </i> <i>"not supposed to be noticed"</i> <i>Right but, why is it not supposed to be noticed ?</i> <i>I grew up on Alfred Hitchcock's films, Bernard Herrmann, and i noticed every note.</i> <i>And I find it a little bit baffling why that seems to be the consciousness</i> <i>of music and film.</i> But there is one thing we haven't mentioned yet and it's very important. Today blockbuster movie scores are composed to a particular process, And that process starts with one controversial element : <i>Danny you groaned earlier when someone mentioned temp music, the pros and cons ?</i> <i>For me temp music is the bane of my existence</i> <i>it's my job to make the director forget everything he's heard in the temp,</i> <i>I won't listen to it but once, I'll never listened to it twice, </i> <i>and if they're addicted to it it's just going to make my job harder.</i> Let's back up a second : temp music is when you're editing a film, and you take music from another movie and use it temporarily in your cut like this : Tenp music is always supposed to be replaced by composers' original score. But sometimes directors or producers will tell their composer to imitate the temp. To our knowledge, this is the only time a studio has publicly apologized for imitating temp music. The far more pervasive effect is that now most blockbusters attempt with each other scores. So they kind of sound like each other, but just within legal limits. And as the Marvel franchise has become more popular, now other films sound like they were tempt with Marvel music. We want to emphasize : we're not blaming the composers. Things don't get this way unless its systemic. Before temp music became popular, directors would often reference other music as a way to talk to the composer. But what changed everything was modern nonlinear editing which allowed a director to put their favorite music in the movie and have the editor cut to it. Now, director points to the temp and says : "Make it like that". And it's not because the music is the right choice, but because they've listened to it. <i>Again and again and again for hours and hours</i> <i>making a DVD that match and they go back with another idea another version the</i> <i>next day with the same music, and at some point of the music stick to the picture.</i> <i>- They can spend a year before you arrive.</i> <i>By the way when you take that music out often the cut isn't right</i> <i>because they're cutting to something that... It's very frustrating.</i> Part of the frustration is that filmmakers just reuse things that worked in every other movie, so you end up with the lowest common denominator. Remember this ? Let's try something different. So earlier in the film, Thor convinced his friends to do something illegal and he was banished. Now they're doing something illegal to find him. He's not asking for their help, they're giving it willingly. What if we heard this feeling in the music ? We're not saying this is the right choice here, but it's worth trying out. Because it makes the scene emotionally richer. And all of the choices you see in Marvel films : the background noise, hearing what you see, adding a narrator, temp music. All of these stem from the same desire : to keep things safe. This is not bad music, it's just bland and inoffensive. And because Marvel sacrifices emotional richness for these safe choices, the end result is this : <i>Oh... Marvel ? Na - oh...</i> So what is missing from Marvel music ? Risk. The kind of risk that creates an emotional connection with the audience. So that they carry the music with them. People do not remember safe choices. Only bold original music, and do this : But that being said, we did find one Marvel theme that still got this reaction : <i>Spiderman ! Spiderman ! Friendly neighborhood Spiderman ! </i> <i>Spins web any size, catch thieves, just like flies. Look out ! Here comes Spider-man! </i> <i>Is he strong? Listen bud, he's got radioactive blood. </i> <i>Can he swing from a thread Take a look overhead.</i> <i>Hey there There goes the Spiderman. </i> <i>In the chill of night At the scene of a crime</i> <i>Like a streak of light He arrives just in time. </i> <i>Spiderman, Spiderman, Friendly neighborhood Spiderman, Wealth and fame, He's ignored, Action is his reward. </i> <i>To him, life is a great big bang up. Wherever there's a hang up, You'll find the Spider man.</i> <i>-That was incredible ! Thank you so much !</i> Subtitles by the Amara.org community

Contents

Background

Ed Mintz founded CinemaScore in 1979 after disliking The Cheap Detective despite being a fan of Neil Simon, and hearing another disappointed attendee wanting to hear the opinions of ordinary people instead of critics. A Yom Kippur donation card with tabs inspired the survey cards given to audience members.[1] The company conducts surveys to audiences who have seen a film in theaters, asking them to rate the film and specifying what drew them to the film. Its results are published in Entertainment Weekly. CinemaScore also conducts surveys to determine audience interest in renting films on video, breaking the demographic down by age and sex and passing along information to video companies such as Fox Video Corporation.[2]

CinemaScore pollster Dede Gilmore reported the trend in 1993, "Most movies get easily a B-plus. I think people come wanting the entertainment. They have high expectations. They're more lenient with their grades. But as (moviegoers) do it more and more, they get to be stronger critics". In 1993, films that were graded with an A included Scent of a Woman, A Few Good Men and Falling Down. Films graded with a B included Sommersby and Untamed Heart. A C-grade film for the year was Body of Evidence.[2]

CinemaScore at first reported its findings to consumers, including a newspaper column and a radio show. After 20th Century Fox approached the company in 1989, it began selling the data to studios instead.[1] A website was launched by CinemaScore in 1999, after three years' delay in which the president sought sponsorship from magazines and video companies. Brad Peppard was president of CinemaScore Online from 1999 to 2002.[3] The website included a database of nearly 2,000 feature films and the audiences' reactions to them. Prior to the launch, CinemaScore results had been published in Las Vegas Review-Journal and Reno Gazette-Journal. CinemaScore's expansion to the Internet included a weekly email subscription for cinephiles to keep up with reports of audience reactions.[4]

In 1999, CinemaScore was rating approximately 140 films a year, including 98–99% of major studio releases. For each film, employees polled 400–500 moviegoers in three of CinemaScore's 15 sites, which included the cities Las Vegas, Los Angeles, San Diego, Denver, Milwaukee, St. Louis, Dallas, Atlanta, Tampa, Phoenix, and Coral Springs.[4]

In the summer of 2002, CinemaScore reported that the season had the biggest collective grade since 1995. In the summer of 2000, 25 out of 32 films received either an A or B grade. Twenty-six of the summer of 2001's 30 films got similar grades, while 32 of the summer of 2002's 34 films got similar grades, the latter being the highest ratio in a decade.[5]

Since July 2014, CinemaScore reports its results also on Twitter,[6] and from January 16, 2016, it began with Collateral Beauty to use for each of them an image with the movie poster on the left and the grade obtained on the right.[7] Starting with Miss Bala in February 2019, CinemaScore began polling throughout opening weekend and releasing grades on Monday, as opposed to the original Friday-only responses, similar to fellow audience response service PostTrak.[8]

Usually, only films that open in more than 1,500 screens are polled and reported on CinemaScore's website and social media. The distributor of a film that opens in fewer screens can optionally contract with CinemaScore for a private survey, whose result would be disclosed only to the client.[9]

Rating

A CinemaScore survey card
A CinemaScore survey card

CinemaScore describes itself as "the industry leader in measuring movie appeal".[10] Thirty-five to 45 teams of CinemaScore representatives are present in 25 large cities across North America. Each Friday, representatives in five randomly chosen cities give opening-day audiences a small survey card.[11][12][13] The card asks for age, gender, a grade for the film (A, B, C, D or F), whether they would rent or buy the film on DVD or Blu-ray, and why they chose the film.[12] CinemaScore typically receives about 400 cards per film;[14] the company estimates a 65% response rate and 6% margin of error.[13]

An overall grade of A+ and F is calculated as the average of the grades given by responders. In this case, grades other than F are qualified with a plus (high end), minus (low end) or neither (middle). The ratings are divided by gender and age groups (under 21, 21–34, 35 and up).[4] Film studios and other subscribers receive the initial data at about 11 p.m. Pacific Time on Friday, although the official results are not published until Monday. CinemaScore publishes letter grades to the public on social media and, although the detailed data is proprietary, the grades become widely shared in the media and the industry. Subsequent advertisements for highly ranked films often cite their CinemaScore grades.[12][14][13]

An A+ grade from CinemaScore for a film typically predicts a successful box office. From 1982 to August 2011, only 52 films (about two a year) received the top grade, including seven Academy Award for Best Picture winners.[11] From 2000 to February 2018, there were 44 movies with A+.[15] As of April 5, 2018, 77 films have received A+.[16]

From 2004 to 2014, those rated A+ and A had multiples of 4.8 and 3.6, respectively, while C-rated films' total revenue was 2.5 times their opening weekend.[13] As opening-night audiences are presumably more enthusiastic about a film than ordinary patrons, a C grade from them is - according to the Los Angeles Times - "bad news, the equivalent of a failing grade".[12] (Horror films rarely receive high grades; The Conjuring's A- was the first A grade in the genre. CinemaScore's Harold Mintz said that "An F in a horror film is equivalent to a B- in a comedy".)[17] According to Ed Mintz, "A’s generally are good, B’s generally are shaky, and C’s are terrible. D’s and F’s, they shouldn’t have made the movie, or they promoted it funny and the absolute wrong crowd got into it". He cited Leonardo DiCaprio and Tom Cruise as the "two stars, it doesn’t matter how bad the film is, they can pull (the projections) up".[1] (DiCaprio's Shutter Island had a 3.1 revenue multiple despite a C+ grade, and Cruise's Vanilla Sky had a 4 multiple with a D grade.)[13]

As of 2018 nineteen films have received an F grade from CinemaScore.[18][17] Vulture wrote that besides horror,[17]

Another type of movie features prominently on the list: let’s call it "Misleading Auteurism." These are movies made by prominent, often Oscar-nominated directors that investigate risky and controversial subject matters and receive both praise and pans. But because of how the movie industry works — the name of a director alone not being enough to get most people to go see something — they tend to be marketed as more straight-ahead genre films, resulting in a whole bunch of misled and pissed-off audience members.

Vulture cited as examples of such F-graded films Steven Soderbergh's Solaris with George Clooney, Andrew Dominik's Killing Them Softly with Brad Pitt, and Darren Aronofsky's Mother! with Jennifer Lawrence.[17]

CinemaScore's forecasts for box-office receipts based on the surveys are, according to the Los Angeles Times, "surprisingly accurate" as "most of [the company's] picks...are in the ballpark", in 2009 correctly predicting the success of The Hangover and the failure of Land of the Lost.[12] Hollywood executives are divided on CinemaScore's accuracy. One told Deadline Hollywood "It's not always right, but it's a pretty good indicator. I rely on it", while another said that competitor PostTrak was "much better...more thorough and in-depth".[13][19]

List of A+ films

No. Year Title Director
1 1982 E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial[11] Steven Spielberg
2 1982 Gandhi[11] Richard Attenborough
3 1982 Rocky III[11] Sylvester Stallone
4 1986 Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home[11] Leonard Nimoy
5 1987 The Princess Bride[11] Rob Reiner
6 1988 Die Hard[11] John McTiernan
7 1989 Dead Poets Society[11] Peter Weir
8 1989 Driving Miss Daisy[11] Bruce Beresford
9 1989 A Dry White Season[11] Euzhan Palcy
10 1989 Lean on Me[11] John G. Avildsen
11 1989 Lethal Weapon 2[11] Richard Donner
12 1989 When Harry Met Sally...[11] Rob Reiner
13 1990 Dances with Wolves[11] Kevin Costner
14 1991 Beauty and the Beast[11]
15 1991 Terminator 2: Judgment Day[11] James Cameron
16 1992 Aladdin[11]
17 1992 A Few Good Men[11] Rob Reiner
18 1993 The Fugitive[11] Andrew Davis
19 1993 Homeward Bound: The Incredible Journey[11] Duwayne Dunham
20 1993 The Joy Luck Club[11] Wayne Wang
21 1993 Schindler's List[11] Steven Spielberg
22 1994 Forrest Gump[11] Robert Zemeckis
23 1994 Iron Will[11] Charles Haid
24 1994 The Lion King[11]
25 1995 Mr. Holland's Opus[11] Stephen Herek
26 1997 Soul Food[11] George Tillman Jr.
27 1997 Titanic[11] James Cameron
28 1998 Mulan[11]
29 1999 Music of the Heart[11] Wes Craven
30 1997 Star Wars (1997 re-release)[11] George Lucas
31 1999 Toy Story 2[11] John Lasseter
32 2000 Finding Forrester[11][15] Gus Van Sant
33 2000 Remember the Titans[11][15] Boaz Yakin
34 2001 Monsters, Inc.[11][15] Pete Docter
35 2002 Antwone Fisher[15] Denzel Washington
36 2002 Drumline[11][15] Charles Stone III
37 2002 Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets[11][15] Chris Columbus
38 2003 Finding Nemo[15] Andrew Stanton
39 2003 The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King[15] Peter Jackson
40 2004 The Passion of the Christ[11][15] Mel Gibson
41 2004 The Incredibles[11][15] Brad Bird
42 2004 The Polar Express[11][15] Robert Zemeckis
43 2004 Ray[11][15] Taylor Hackford
44 2005 Dreamer[11][15] John Gatins
45 2005 Diary of a Mad Black Woman[11][15] Darren Grant
46 2005 Cinderella Man[11][15] Ron Howard
47 2005 The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe[11][15] Andrew Adamson
48 2006 Akeelah and the Bee[11][15] Doug Atchison
49 2007 Why Did I Get Married?[11][15] Tyler Perry
50 2009 Up[11][15] Pete Docter
51 2009 The Blind Side[11][15] John Lee Hancock
52 2010 The King's Speech[11][15] Tom Hooper
53 2010 Tangled[11][15]
54 2011 Soul Surfer[11][15] Sean McNamara
55 2011 Courageous[15] Alex Kendrick
56 2011 Dolphin Tale[15] Charles Martin Smith
57 2011 The Help[11][15] Tate Taylor
58 2012 The Avengers[15] Joss Whedon
59 2012 Argo[15] Ben Affleck
60 2013 42[15] Brian Helgeland
61 2013 Instructions Not Included[15] Eugenio Derbez
62 2013 The Best Man Holiday[15] Malcolm D. Lee
63 2013 Frozen[15]
64 2013 Lone Survivor[15] Peter Berg
65 2014 Selma[15] Ava DuVernay
66 2014 American Sniper[15] Clint Eastwood
67 2015 Woodlawn[15] Erwin Brothers
68 2016 Miracles from Heaven[15] Patricia Riggen
69 2016 Queen of Katwe[15] Mira Nair
70 2016 Hidden Figures[15][20] Theodore Melfi
71 2016 Patriots Day[15][21] Peter Berg
72 2017 Girls Trip[15][22] Malcolm D. Lee
73 2017 Wonder[15][23] Stephen Chbosky
74 2017 Coco[15][24] Lee Unkrich
75 2018 Black Panther[15][25] Ryan Coogler
76 2018 I Can Only Imagine[26] Erwin Brothers
77 2018 Love, Simon[27] Greg Berlanti
78 2018 Incredibles 2[28] Brad Bird
79 2018 The Hate U Give[29] George Tillman Jr.
80 2018 Green Book[30] Peter Farrelly
81 2018 Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse[31][32]

So far in the list the following directors occur twice: Steven Spielberg (1982, 1993), James Cameron (1991, 1997), Robert Zemeckis (1994, 2004), Pete Docter (2001, 2009), Malcolm D. Lee (2013, 2017), Peter Berg (2013, 2016), Erwin Brothers (2015, 2018), Brad Bird (2004, 2018) & George Tillman Jr. (1997, 2018). Only Rob Reiner occurs three times (1987, 1989, 1992).

List of F films

No. Year Title Director
1 1999 Eye of the Beholder[18][17] Stephan Elliott
2 2000 Dr. T and the Women[18][17] Robert Altman
3 2000 Lost Souls[18][17] Janusz Kamiński
4 2000 Lucky Numbers[18][17] Nora Ephron
5 2002 Darkness[18][17] Jaume Balagueró
6 2002 Fear Dot Com[18][17] William Malone
7 2002 Solaris[18][17] Steven Soderbergh
8 2003 In the Cut[18][17] Jane Campion
9 2005 Alone in the Dark[18][17] Uwe Boll
10 2005 Wolf Creek[18][17] Greg McLean
11 2006 Bug[18][17] William Friedkin
12 2006 The Wicker Man[18][17] Neil LaBute
13 2007 I Know Who Killed Me[18][17] Chris Sivertson
14 2008 Disaster Movie[18][17] Jason Friedberg
Aaron Seltzer
15 2009 The Box[18][17] Richard Kelly
16 2011 Silent House[18][17] Chris Kentis
Laura Lau
17 2012 Killing Them Softly[18][17] Andrew Dominik
18 2012 The Devil Inside[18][17] William Brent Bell
19 2017 Mother![18][17][33] Darren Aronofsky

References

  1. ^ a b c Lawrence, Christopher (2016-08-30). "Las Vegan's polling company keeps tabs on Hollywood". Vegas Voices (story series). Las Vegas Review-Journal. Retrieved March 19, 2017.
  2. ^ a b Wieland, Chris (March 20, 1993). "In Springs, Everybody's a Critic". South Florida Sun-Sentinel. Broward County, Florida. Retrieved March 19, 2017.
  3. ^ Proxy Statement to SEC, April 18, 2004 Rainmaker Systems, Inc.
  4. ^ a b c Cling, Carol (1999-09-16). "CinemaScore expands to Internet to offer moviegoers current information". Las Vegas Review-Journal. Stephens Media.
  5. ^ Bowles, Scott (2002-08-01). "Movies make the grade with fans, critics alike". USA Today. Gannett Company.
  6. ^ CinemaScore's account on Twitter.
  7. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (January 16, 2016). "Collateral Beauty". Retrieved March 12, 2018.
  8. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (February 8, 2018). "'Lego Movie 2' Breaks Down To $33M+; 'What Men Want' Solid With $18M+ In Another Blasé B.O. Weekend". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  9. ^ Wilkinson, Alissa (August 13, 2018). "CinemaScore, Rotten Tomatoes, and movie audience scores, explained". Vox. Retrieved August 18, 2018.
  10. ^ "Cinemascore :: About Us". www.cinemascore.com. Retrieved 2018-12-15.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb McClintock, Pamela (August 19, 2011). "Why CinemaScore Matters for Box Office". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved March 28, 2013.
  12. ^ a b c d e Goldstein, Patrick (October 13, 2009). "CinemaScore's box-office swami". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  13. ^ a b c d e f Busch, Anita (August 9, 2014). "B Grade For 'Turtles': What CinemaScores Mean And Why Exit Polling Matters". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved August 20, 2014.
  14. ^ a b Cunningham, Todd (June 18, 2013). "CinemaScore Gets 'A' From Studios, Especially When It Counters Critics". TheWrap. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  15. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as Geier, Thom (February 17, 2018). "44 Movies With A+ CinemaScore Since 2000, From 'Remember the Titans' to 'Black Panther' (Photos)". TheWrap. Retrieved February 25, 2018.
  16. ^ Pooley, Jack (2018-04-05). "Every Movie That Received An F CinemaScore Ranked From Worst To Best". WhatCulture. Retrieved 2018-12-14.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w Lincoln, Kevin (September 20, 2017). "What the 19 Movies to Ever Receive an 'F' CinemaScore Have in Common". vulture.com. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t Geier, Thom; Fuster, Jeremy (February 17, 2018). "All 19 Movies That Flunked CinemaScore With F Grade, From 'Solaris' to 'mother!' (Photos)". TheWrap. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  19. ^ McClintock, Pamela (September 18, 2013). "CinemaScore in Retreat as Studios Turn to PostTrak". The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved May 8, 2018.
  20. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (January 6, 2017). "Hidden Figures". Retrieved April 10, 2017.
  21. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (January 13, 2017). "Patriots Day". Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  22. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (July 21, 2017). "Girls Trip". Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  23. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (November 18, 2017). "Wonder". Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  24. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (November 23, 2017). "Coco". Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  25. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (February 16, 2018). "Black Panther". Retrieved February 26, 2018.
  26. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (March 16, 2018). "I Can Only Imagine". Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  27. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (March 16, 2018). "Love, Simon". Retrieved March 16, 2018.
  28. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (June 15, 2018). "Incredibles 2". Retrieved July 30, 2018.
  29. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (October 19, 2018). "The Hate U Give". Retrieved October 20, 2018.
  30. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (November 25, 2018). "'Ralph' Breaking The B.O. With $18.5M Weds., Potential Record $95M Five-Day; 'Creed II' Pumping $11.6M Opening Day, $61M Five-Day". Deadline Hollywood. Retrieved February 9, 2019.
  31. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (December 14, 2018). "Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse". Retrieved December 19, 2018.
  32. ^ D'Alessandro, Anthony (December 15, 2018). "'Spider-Verse' Catching $36M, 'The Mule' Carrying Near $18M, 'Mortal Engines' Fails To Start With $7M+". Retrieved December 15, 2018.
  33. ^ CinemaScore on Twitter (September 16, 2017). "Mother!". Retrieved May 8, 2018.

External links

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