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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Theatrical poster from 1900 showing an early chorus line.
Theatrical poster from 1900 showing an early chorus line.
A modern chorus line
A modern chorus line

A chorus line is a large group of dancers who together perform synchronized routines, usually in musical theatre. Sometimes, singing is also performed.

Chorus line dancers in Broadway musicals and revues have been referred to by slang terms such as ponies, gypsies and twirlies. A chorus girl or chorine is a female performer in a chorus line (i.e. the chorus of a theatrical production as opposed to a choir).

Famous chorus lines

Famous performers

Performers who started out dancing in chorus lines include:

See also

References

  1. ^ Stuart, Judson D. (May 1915). "The High Cost of Stage Beauty". The Theatre. New York, New York: The Theatre Magazine Co.: 240. Retrieved June 18, 2021 – via Google books.
  2. ^ a b c d e Cantu, Maya. American Cinderellas on the Broadway Musical Stage: Imagining the Working Girl from Irene to Gypsy, p. 49 (Palgrave Macmillan 2015).
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-11-07. Retrieved 2017-10-30.CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ "Profile: 'Call me Madam'". BBC News. 2000-10-23. Retrieved 2012-09-09.
  5. ^ "Obituary: Anise Boyer Burris". New York Amsterdam News. October 23, 2008. p. 37 – via ProQuest.
  6. ^ Freeland, David (2009). "Automats, Taxi Dances, and Vaudeville: Excavating Manhattan's Lost Places of Leisure". NYU Press. p. xii.
  7. ^ a b Cantu, Maya. American Cinderellas on the Broadway Musical Stage: Imagining the Working Girl from Irene to Gypsy, p. 18 (Palgrave Macmillan 2015).
This page was last edited on 25 October 2021, at 14:35
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