To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Chinese Tartary

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

D’Anville’s map of China and Chinese Tartary created in 1734
D’Anville’s map of China and Chinese Tartary created in 1734

Chinese Tartary (see also Tartary) is an archaic geographical term used especially during the time of the Qing Dynasty. The term was used as early as 1734 on a map created by the French geographer and cartographer Jean Baptiste Bourguignon d’Anville (1697–1782) who published the map in the Nouvel atlas de la Chine, de la Tartarie Chinoise et du Thibet (New atlas of China, Chinese Tartary, and Tibet) in 1738 (refer to the date of 1734 that appears on the map).

D’Anville’s map was based on work ordered by the Emperor of China and conducted by Chinese under the supervision of the Jesuits.[1] Also published in 1738 was A description of the empire of China and Chinese-Tartary together with the kingdoms of Korea, and Tibet by Father Jean-Baptiste Du Halde.[2] He went on to write in 1741 The General History of China Containing a Geographical, Historical, Chronological, Political and Physical Description of the Empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet.[3]

Modern areas today that were described by their work as falling within Chinese Tartary included:

In 1832, its geographical boundaries are defined in A Geographical Dictionary Or Universal Gazetteer.[4]

By 1867, the areas of Chinese Tartary were described as the vast three areas covering Manchuria, Mongolia and Ili (Xinjiang).[5]

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/2
    Views:
    1 189
    8 063
  • East Turkestan
  • Замалчиваемая история России 5/8 (Sub)

Transcription

Further reading

  • "Chinese Tartary." The Asiatic journal and monthly register for British and foreign India, China and Australasia, Volume 20. Allen, 1836. p. 292.

References

  1. ^ "New atlas of China, Chinese Tartary, and Tibet". World Digital Library.
  2. ^ A description of the empire of China and Chinese-Tartary together with the kingdoms of Korea, and Tibet by Jean-Baptiste Du Halde, Volume 2 (1738).
  3. ^ {https://archive.org/details/generalhistoryc02haldgoog The General History of China: Containing a Geographical, Historical, Chronological, Political and Physical Description of the Empire of China, Chinese-Tartary, Corea and Thibet] by Jean-Baptiste Du Halde, Volume 2 (1736).
  4. ^ Joseph Emerson Worcester (1832). "A Geographical Dictionary Or Universal Gazetteer, Ancient and Modern, Volume 2".
  5. ^ Notes on Chinese Tartary by Captain Sherard Osborne R.N. C.B, Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society of London Vol. 11, No. 4 (1866 - 1867), pp. 162-166
This page was last edited on 14 September 2020, at 01:11
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.