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Charlotte Prodger

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Charlotte Prodger (born 1974) is a British artist and film-maker[1] who works with "moving image, printed image, sculpture and writing".[2] Her films include Stoneymollan Trail (2015) and Bridgit (2016). In 2018 she won the Turner Prize.

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  • ✪ Sculpture Center Charlotte Prodger & Teresa Burga
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  • ✪ The Hepworth Prize for Sculpture: Phillip Lai
  • ✪ THE SQUASH - ANTHEA HAMILTON ARTIST TATE BRITAIN COMMISSION 2018 22 MAR - 7 OCT 2018

Transcription

Contents

Early life

Prodger was born in Bournemouth in 1974[3]. Between 1997-2001, she studied Fine Art (Studio Practice and Contemporary Critical Theory) at Goldsmiths, University of London, and between 2008-2010 she studied Masters in Fine Art at the Glasgow School of Art.[3][4][5]

Career

Prodger works with "moving image, printed image, sculpture and writing".[2] Her film Stoneymollan Trail is a compilation of scenes made since the late 1990s using "old camcorder, HD and more recent iPhone footage".[6] Her film Bridgit (2016) addresses issues of queer identity and was shot using an iPhone.[7]

In 2017 Prodger undertook the Berwick Artists' Moving Image Residency, where she developed LHB, a new single-screen work for cinema that premiered at Berwick Film & Media Arts Festival 2017.

In 2018 she won the Turner Prize for an exhibition of Bridgit and Stoneymollan Trail at Bergen Kunsthall in Norway.[7][8] Between 11 May – 24 November 2019 she was presented by Scotland + Venice[9] at the Arsenale Docks as part of the 58th Venice Biennale.[10][5] As part of the Collateral Events, Scotland + Venice commissioned Charlotte Prodger to create SaF05 (2019), a new single channel video work to be screened across seven cinemas and art centres in Scotland. The UK premiere was held at The Tower Digital Arts Centre in Argyll & Bute on 27 June 2019.[11] The work shown is the last of a trilogy that began with Stoneymollan Trail (2015) followed by BRIDGIT (2016). The work was curated by Linsey Young in partnership with Alexia Holt of Cove Park, where the work was developed.[12]

She is represented by Hollybush Gardens and Koppe Astner.[13]


Films

  • HDHB (2012) in collaboration with Corin Sworn – 10 minutes
  • Stoneymollan Trail (2015) – 43 minutes
  • BRIDGIT (2016) – 32 minutes
  • PASSING AS A GREAT GREY OWL (2017) – 6 minutes
  • LHB (2017) – 25 minutes
  • SaF05 (2019) – 39 minutes
Charlotte Prodger
Born
Bournemouth, UK
ResidenceGlasgow, Scotland
EducationGoldsmiths, University of London The Glasgow School of Art
OccupationArtist
Notable work
BRIDGIT (2016)

Solo exhibitions

Group Exhibitions

Collections

Prodger's work is held in the following public collections:

Personal life

Prodger lives and works in Glasgow.[3][6]

References

  1. ^ Guardian. "Charlotte Prodger". Guardian. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  2. ^ a b Tate. "Charlotte Prodger". Tate. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  3. ^ a b c Tate. "Charlotte Prodger - Tate". Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  4. ^ "Charlotte Prodger the latest Glasgow-trained artist up for the Turner". Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d e "biography | Hollybush Gardens". Hollybush Gardens. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  6. ^ a b Searle, Adrian (26 October 2015). "Charlotte Prodger's elegy to time, loss and casual sex". The Guardian. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  7. ^ a b c Brown, Mark (4 December 2018). "iPhone film-maker Charlotte Prodger wins 2018 Turner prize". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved 2018-12-05 – via www.theguardian.com.
  8. ^ "iPhone artist Prodger wins Turner Prize". BBC News. 4 December 2018. Retrieved 2018-12-05 – via www.bbc.co.uk.
  9. ^ a b "Charlotte Prodger: SaF05 – Scotland + Venice 2019 official Collateral Event for the 58th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia". Scotland + Venice. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  10. ^ Miller, Phil (31 May 2018). "Turner Prize short listed artist Charlotte Prodger to represent Scotland in Venice". The Herald. Retrieved 2018-10-22.
  11. ^ "Charlotte Prodger's new film for Scotland + Venice to tour across Scotland". Scotland + Venice. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  12. ^ "A Major New Work by Charlotte Prodger Launches in Venice « Cove Park". covepark.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  13. ^ "Charlotte Prodger". LUX. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  14. ^ "Charlotte Prodger at CCA Center for Contemporary Arts Glasgow - Artmap.com". artmap.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  15. ^ "Essex Street". www.essexstreet.biz. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  16. ^ "Charlotte Prodger, Percussion Biface 1-13, 2012". Studio Voltaire. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  17. ^ "Sunday". www.sundayartfair.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  18. ^ "Festival 2014". Glasgow International. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  19. ^ "CHELSEA space: #55 Markets - The Block and Charlotte Prodger". www.chelseaspace.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  20. ^ Irel, Temple Bar Gallery + Studios / 5-9 Temple Bar / Dublin 2 /; Fax +3531 677 7527, Telephone +3531 671 0073 /. "'Stoneymollan Trail', Charlotte Prodger :: Temple Bar Gallery + Studios :: Dublin Ireland". www.templebargallery.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  21. ^ "Charlotte Prodger, 8004 – 8019 exhibition at Spike Island, Bristol". Spike Island. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  22. ^ "Charlotte Prodger at Kunstverein Düsseldorf Düsseldorf - Artmap.com". artmap.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  23. ^ "BRIDGIT – Charlotte Prodger | Hollybush Gardens". Hollybush Gardens. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  24. ^ "BRIDGIT / Stoneymollan Trail". Bergen Kunsthall. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
  25. ^ "COLON HYPHEN ASTERIX, Hollybush Gardens, 2018 | Hollybush Gardens". Hollybush Gardens. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  26. ^ "2HB: What we make with words at CCA Center for Contemporary Arts Glasgow - Artmap.com". artmap.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  27. ^ "SOUNDWORKS". archive.ica.art. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  28. ^ "Hotel • Exhibitions". www.generalhotel.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  29. ^ "PARAPHANTOMS | Ed Atkins, Trisha Baga, Amy Granat, Corin Sworn & Charlotte Prodger, Joseph Zehrer | 10 November – 22 December 2012 – Temporary Gallery". www.temporarygallery.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  30. ^ "2013". Poor Farm. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  31. ^ "Frozen Lakes". artistsspace.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  32. ^ Glasgow, Tramway 25 Albert Drive (2014-07-17). "Costume: Written Clothing". www.tramway.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  33. ^ "Holes in the Walls at Fri Art | Kunsthalle Freiburg Fribourg - Artmap.com". artmap.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  34. ^ "Exhibitions Archive – Wysing Arts Centre". www.wysingartscentre.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  35. ^ "Pilar Corrias — Phantom Limbs". www.pilarcorrias.com. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  36. ^ a b c "Koppe Astner". Koppe Astner. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  37. ^ "Anarchic sexual desires…@ P/N, Jul 10 – Aug 10". atractivoquenobello. 2015-07-08. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  38. ^ "Murray Guy » The Secret Life, 2015". Murray Guy. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  39. ^ "Publication - DIDING – An Interior That Remains an Exterior? :: KM– Künstlerhaus, Halle für Kunst & Medien". www.km-k.at. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  40. ^ "Windows Hung with Shutters at RaebervonStenglin – Art Viewer". Art Viewer. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  41. ^ a b "Charlotte Prodger, British Art Show 8 Leeds Oct 2015-Jan 2016". British Art Show 8.
  42. ^ Tate. "Art Now: The Weight of Data – Exhibition at Tate Britain". Tate. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  43. ^ "Coming Out at Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery". Birmingham Museums.
  44. ^ "WHEN MY EYES SAW AND MY EARS HEARD | Hollybush Gardens". Hollybush Gardens. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  45. ^ "CHELSEA space: #74 ORGASMIC STREAMING ORGANIC GARDENING ELECTROCULTURE". www.chelseaspace.org. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  46. ^ Tate. "Turner Prize 2018 – Exhibition at Tate Britain". Tate. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  47. ^ "ALWAYS DIFFERENT, ALWAYS THE SAME. An Essay on Art and Systems | Snoeck". snoeck.de. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  48. ^ "Palimpsest: 31 March – 13 October 2019". Lismore Castle Arts. Retrieved 2019-09-03.
  49. ^ "Bridgit". Arts Council Collection. Retrieved 2018-12-05.
This page was last edited on 14 October 2019, at 21:23
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