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Channing (TV series)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Channing
Channingtv.jpg
title card for Channing
Also known as''The Young and the Bold''
GenreDrama
Written byTheodore Apstein
Robert Kaufman
Ken Kolb
StarringJason Evers
Henry Jones
Composer(s)Jack Marshall
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
No. of seasons1
No. of episodes26
Production
Executive producer(s)Stanley Rubin
Producer(s)Jack Laird
Running time45–48 minutes
Production company(s)Revue-Betford
DistributorNBC Universal Television Distribution
Release
Original networkABC
Picture formatBlack-and-white
Audio formatMonaural
Original releaseSeptember 18, 1963 (1963-09-18) –
April 8, 1964 (1964-04-08)

Channing (also known as The Young and the Bold) is an hour-long American drama series that aired at 10:00 p.m. on ABC from September 18, 1963 to April 8, 1964.[1] The series depicted life at fictitious Channing College, with Jason Evers in the lead role of Professor Joseph Howe, and Henry Jones as Fred Baker, the dean of the institution.[2]

Channing, a production of Revue Studios, aired during the same time frame as the first season of NBC's somewhat similar offering, Mr. Novak.

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Transcription

Love them or hate them, the Hilton family is an institution. They're arguably more famous for their scandals than their hotel chain, but even this publicity-loving clan has some secrets they don't want you knowing. Just how crazy can one family get? These are the secrets the Hilton family tried to hide. Conrad's Drug Problem Popped for drugs while on parole in 2016 and facing a 2-month prison sentence, the 22-year old Conrad Hilton is no stranger to the wrong side of the law. According to People, Conrad has had drug problems since he was a teenager, and it obviously hasn't gotten any better. The revelations shed new light on his notorious 2014 airplane freak-out, when an out-of-control Conrad reportedly threatened to kill the flight crew, saying, "I will f---ing own anyone on this flight… they are f---ing peasants." Paris Can't Keep Clean Either No one's worse at keeping her drug use secret than Paris. You'd think that being the highest-profile Hilton would encourage her to keep it on the DL, but back in 2010, she was pulled over in Las Vegas with then-boyfriend Cy Waits. According to The New York Times, the Escalade reeked of marijuana, and a bindle of cocaine in a plastic bag came out of Hilton’s purse while she was reaching into the car for lip balm. Say what you will, but you can't deny her lips looked good for the mugshot. Creepy Crib Remember the gang of teenage thieves who called themselves the “Bling Ring”? They’d spent a year between 2008 and 2009 breaking into celebs' homes and making off with thousands of dollars in clothes, jewelry, and cold hard cash before finally getting busted. One of their targets was an out-of-town Paris Hilton, who left her key under the doormat. "Oh! Oh my god" "It was really scary to know that people were in my home, going through my things, taking all these things I'll never be able to replace." Once inside, the burglars allegedly found throw pillows covered with images of Hilton's face, stripper poles, and cocaine. Bling Ring member Nick Prugo told Vanity Fair, "There was that percentage of 'Wow, this is Paris Hilton's house,' but as soon as I put my foot in the door I was just wanting to run out." Paris appeared in Sofia Coppola's The Bling Ring, which was loosely based on the thieves of the same name. The film even reenacted the break-in at Hilton's home, which actually contained a party room, complete with a stripper pole and pillows with pictures of Paris stitched into them, but her alleged bags of cocaine were nowhere to be found. Elizabeth Taylor Was A Hilton Conrad "Nicky" Hilton. Jr. thought he'd found true love when he met Elizabeth Taylor in a Los Angeles nightclub in 1949. Married a year later in front of thousands of guests in an outrageously expensive wedding, the young lovers quickly embarked on a three-month European honeymoon...where they promptly learned to hate each others' guts. Hilton was derisively referred to as "Mr. Taylor" and soon grew to enjoy gambling more than the company of his bride, according to Entertainment Weekly. Taylor won her first divorce of many, refusing alimony on the grounds of "mental cruelty." Conrad Jr. died, at age 42 of an alcoholism-related heart attack. Borrowed Bucks Apparently it wasn't always smooth sailing for Conrad Hilton Sr., according to The Hiltons: The True Story of an American Dynasty. Hilton Sr., who was made famous all over again by TV's Mad Men, once needed to take out a $500 loan from his own bellboy to pull himself out of debt, which would be about $7,000 today. Things ended up working out pretty well for both of them. Hilton's hotels bounced back, and the bellboy became an executive. It's no surprise the family doesn't bring it up too often. It was a pretty big ask on Hilton's part. "But when I say I want the moon, I expect the moon." Thanks for watching! Subscribe to our YouTube channel to watch more videos like the one you just saw. And leave us a comment to let us know what secrets you think the Hilton Family is trying to hide...

Contents

Synopsis

According to the story line, Professor Howe had served in the Korean War and was writing a novel in his spare time. In a 1964 episode entitled "The Trouble with Girls", Keir Dullea and Mark Goddard appear as roommates who clash over a girl, Lynn Walton, played by Joey Heatherton. Dullea's character has a nervous breakdown and leaves college.

Don Gordon played Mario Saccone, a 37-year-old soldier who returns from South Vietnam and enters Channing College. This is more than a year before the large United States troop commitment to Southeast Asia and the subsequent breakdown in campus order at many institutions. Gordon is interested in the younger wife of an older political science professor named Jonathan Kobitz, played by Jacqueline Scott and Wendell Corey, respectively. Robert Lansing appeared as an alcoholic professor wrapped in self-pity. Rip Torn appeared as a graduate student with multiple degrees who remains at Channing because of his social life.

Channing was broadcast at 10 p.m. Eastern on Wednesdays after Ben Casey. Its competition was The Eleventh Hour on NBC and The Danny Kaye Show, a variety show on CBS.[3]

Cast

Notable guest stars

Episodes

No. Title Directed by Written by Original air date
1"Message from the Tin Room"TBATBASeptember 18, 1963 (1963-09-18)
2"Exercise in a Shark Tank"TBATBASeptember 25, 1963 (1963-09-25)
3"An Obelisk for Benny"TBATBAOctober 2, 1963 (1963-10-02)
4"No Wild Games for Sophie"TBATBAOctober 9, 1963 (1963-10-09)
5"Dragon in the Den"TBATBAOctober 23, 1963 (1963-10-23)
6"Potato Bash World"TBATBAOctober 30, 1963 (1963-10-30)
7"Collision Course"TBATBANovember 6, 1963 (1963-11-06)
8"A Patron Saint for the Cargo Cult"TBATBANovember 13, 1963 (1963-11-13)
9"Beyond His Reach"TBATBANovember 27, 1963 (1963-11-27)
10"A Doll's House with Pompoms and Trophies"TBATBADecember 4, 1963 (1963-12-04)
11"A Window on the War"TBATBADecember 11, 1963 (1963-12-11)
12"The Last Testament of Buddy Crown"TBATBADecember 18, 1963 (1963-12-18)
13"A Hall Full of Strangers"TBATBADecember 25, 1963 (1963-12-25)
14"Memory of a Firing Squad"TBATBAJanuary 1, 1964 (1964-01-01)
15"A Rich, Famous, Glamorous Folk Singer Like Me"TBATBAJanuary 8, 1964 (1964-01-08)
16"Swing for the Moon"TBATBAJanuary 15, 1964 (1964-01-15)
17"Another Kind of Music"TBATBAJanuary 22, 1964 (1964-01-22)
18"Ou Sont Les Neiges...?"TBATBAFebruary 12, 1964 (1964-02-12)
19"The Face in the Sun"TBATBAFebruary 19, 1964 (1964-02-19)
20"A Claim to Immortality"TBATBAFebruary 26, 1964 (1964-02-26)
21"Freedom Is a Lovesome Thing God Wot"TBATBAMarch 4, 1964 (1964-03-04)
22"The Trouble With Girls"Alan Crosland Jr.Ken KolbMarch 11, 1964 (1964-03-11)
23"Wave Goodbye to Our Fair-haired Boy"TBATBAMarch 18, 1964 (1964-03-18)
24"A Bang and a Whimper"TBATBAMarch 25, 1964 (1964-03-25)
25"Christmas Day Is Breaking Wan"TBATBAApril 1, 1964 (1964-04-01)
26"My Son, the All-American"TBATBAApril 8, 1964 (1964-04-08)

Production notes

Stanley Rubin (Bracken's World) was the executive producer; Jack Laird (Ben Casey and Kojak), the producer, and Bob Rafelson (the film Five Easy Pieces), the associate producer.

References

  1. ^ Alex McNeil, Total Television, New York: Penguin Books, 1996, 4th ed., p. 154
  2. ^ Adams, Val (January 1, 1964). "A.B.C.-TV TO DROP '77 SUNSET STRIP' / Also Discontinuing 3 Other Series Before April". The New York Times, p.41. Retrieved November 18, 2018.
  3. ^ 1963-1964 American network television schedule, in appendix of Total Television

External links

This page was last edited on 15 March 2019, at 03:00
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