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Cessna 404 Titan

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Titan
Cessna 404 G-EXEX IMG 7659 (9502692081).jpg
The Titan is a twin piston engine, low-wing aircraft with a retractable gear
Role Light passenger/cargo aircraft
Manufacturer Cessna
First flight 26 February 1975
Introduction 1976
Status in use
Produced 1976–1982
Number built 396
Developed from Cessna 402
Variants Cessna 441

The Cessna Model 404 Titan is an American twin-engined, propeller-driven light aircraft built by Cessna Aircraft. It was that company's largest twin piston-engined aircraft at the time of its development in the 1970s. Its US military designation is C-28, and Swedish Air Force designation Tp 87.[1]

History

The aft doors on the left side
The aft doors on the left side

The Cessna 404 was a development of the Cessna 402 with an enlarged vertical tail and other changes. The prototype first flew on 26 February 1975. It is powered by two 375 hp/280 kW turbocharged Continental Motors GTSIO-520 piston engines. Two versions were offered originally; the Titan Ambassador passenger aircraft for ten passengers, and the Titan Courier utility aircraft for passengers or cargo. By early 1982 seven different variants were available, including a pure cargo version, the Titan Freighter. The Freighter was fitted with a strengthened floor, cargo doors, and its interior walls and ceiling were made from impact-resistant polycarbonate materials to minimize damage in the event of cargo breaking free in-flight.

Variants

  • Titan Ambassador – Basic 10-seat passenger aircraft.
  • Titan Ambassador II – Ambassador with factory fitted avionics.
  • Titan Ambassador III – Ambassador with factory fitted avionics.
  • Titan Courier – Convertible passenger/cargo version.
  • Titan Courier II – Courier with factory fitted avionics.
  • Titan Freighter – Cargo version.
  • Titan Freighter II – Freighter with factory fitted avionics.
  • C-28A Titan – Designation given to two aircraft purchased by the United States Navy.[2]

Operators

Military operators

 Bahamas
 Bolivia
 Colombia
 Dominican Republic
 Hong Kong
 Mexico
 Sweden
 Tanzania
 United States
 Puerto Rico

Specifications (Ambassador I)

Data from Jane's All the World's Aircraft 1980–81[6]

General characteristics

  • Crew: 2
  • Capacity: 6–8 passengers
  • Length: 39 ft 6 14 in (12.046 m)
  • Wingspan: 46 ft 8 14 in (14.230 m)
  • Height: 13 ft 3 in (4.04 m)
  • Wing area: 242.0 sq ft (22.48 m2)
  • Aspect ratio: 9.0:1
  • Empty weight: 4,816 lb (2,185 kg)
  • Max takeoff weight: 8,400 lb (3,810 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 340 US gal (280 imp gal; 1,300 L)

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 267 mph (430 km/h, 232 kn) at 16,000 ft (4,900 m)
  • Cruise speed: 188 mph (302 km/h, 163 kn) (econ cruise) at 20,000 ft (6,100 m)
  • Stall speed: 81 mph (130 km/h, 70 kn) flaps down, power off
  • Never exceed speed: 274 mph (441 km/h, 238 kn) (Calibrated airspeed)
  • Range: 2,120 mi (3,410 km, 1,840 nmi)
  • Service ceiling: 26,000 ft (7,900 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,575 ft/min (8.00 m/s)
  • Take-off run to 50 ft (15 m): 2,367 ft (721 m)
  • Landing run from 50 ft (15 m): 2,130 ft (650 m)

See also

a Cessna 404 Titan (left) with square windows besides a pressurized Cessna 421 (right) with round windows
a Cessna 404 Titan (left) with square windows besides a pressurized Cessna 421 (right) with round windows

Related development

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration, and era

References

  1. ^ Urban Fredriksson (4 October 2006). "Swedish Military Aircraft Designations". Retrieved 26 September 2012.
  2. ^ Johnson 2013, p. 375
  3. ^ Gaines Flight International 6 November 1982, p. 1386
  4. ^ Air International April 1986, p. 170
  5. ^ Gaines Flight International 6 November 1982, p. 1374
  6. ^ Taylor 1980, pp. 326–327

External links

This page was last edited on 17 July 2020, at 09:59
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