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Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry
LocationUnited States
First meetingMay 29, 1884[1]
Washington Park, Brooklyn, New York
Browns 0, Atlantics 1
Latest meetingMarch 31, 2024[1]
Dodger Stadium, Los Angeles, California
Cardinals 4, Dodgers 5
Next meetingAugust 16, 2024
Busch Stadium, St. Louis, Missouri
Statistics
Meetings total2,232
All-time seriesCardinals, 1,122–1,092–18 (.507)
Regular season seriesCardinals, 1,108–1,082–18 (.506)[1]
Postseason resultsCardinals, 14–10 (.583)[2]
Largest victory
  • Browns, 19–0 (August 15, 1886)[1]
  • Grooms, 20–4 (August 20, 1894);[1] Dodgers, 20–4 (August 30, 1953)[3]
Longest win streak
Current win streakDodgers, 1[1]
Post-season history

The Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry is a Major League Baseball (MLB) National League rivalry played between the St. Louis Cardinals and the Los Angeles Dodgers. The Cardinals and Dodgers are two of the most successful franchises in the National League, combining for 18 World Series titles. St. Louis and Los Angeles are approximately 1,824 miles apart along Route 66.

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Transcription

Background

Both the Cardinals and Dodgers are two of the oldest franchises in the MLB, predating its 1901 creation. The two teams first met during the 1884 season as members of the American Association. The Cardinals franchise (originally known as the Browns) began in 1882 in St. Louis, Missouri and the Dodgers franchise (originally known as the Atlantics, Grays, and Bridegrooms) began in 1883 in Brooklyn, New York. The Bridgegrooms joined the National League in 1890, while the Browns joined the National League in 1892. Following 77 consecutive seasons in a single-league structure, the National League instituted divisions in 1969, which led to the two teams not playing in the same division. However, frequent close pennant races and matchups in the postseason caused the rivalry to grow in intensity through the decades, particularly during the mid 1960s, 1980s, and 2000s-2010s. From 1963 to 1968 either the Cardinals or Dodgers represented the National League in the World Series. In the 1980s, 2000s, and 2010s the two teams also regularly met in the postseason, with a World Series berth on the line.[4][5][6] Both teams have met each other 2,208 times in the regular season, with 24 postseason games between them.[7] The Cardinals currently have the most regular season wins at 1,108, and the most postseason wins at 14.[8]

Though not as heated as the Dodgers–Giants or Cardinals–Cubs rivalries, there is more mutual respect between both teams; though animosity has steadily grown between both teams.[9][10][11]

History

1940s: First hints at a rivalry and integration

The Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry was particularly intense from 1941 through 1949.[12][13][14] In his autobiography written in 1948, Leo Durocher, who managed the Dodgers for most of the 1940s, described the Cardinals as being "our old rivals."[15] During this period, the Cardinals won the National League pennant 4 times (with the Dodgers finishing 2nd twice) and the Dodgers won the National League pennant 3 times (with the Cardinals finishing 2nd each time). In 1942 the Cardinals overcame a 10 game Dodger lead in early August to win the pennant.[16] In 1946 the Cardinals and Dodgers finished the regular season tied for first place but the Cardinals won the pennant when they prevailed in the first ever playoff tiebreaker in the National League.[17] Cardinal Hall of Famer Enos Slaughter said during this period of the Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry that "We loved to hate them and they loved to hate us."[18]

During this period, after the 1942 season, Branch Rickey, who had built up the Cardinals farm system as their general manager moved to become the Dodgers' general manager.[17] In 1947, after Rickey broke the color line by signing Jackie Robinson to the Dodgers, there were rumors that southerners playing for the Cardinals were planning to boycott games against the Dodgers, although the players later denied it.[19] In general, the Cardinals were latecomers to integration. Front-office executive Bing Devine said the owner from 1947 to 1953, Fred Saigh, refused to sign black players. There was a widespread belief that St. Louis was, in many ways, a Southern city. In the mid-1950s many of its stores and restaurants refused to serve black customers. The Cardinals, with baseball’s largest radio network blanketing the Midwest and South, had cultivated white Southern fans. Their ballpark was also the last in the majors to abolish segregated seating.[20][21] Because of their lack of black players, the Cardinals play suffered on the field tremendously in the 1950s. Meanwhile, with the success of Robinson, the Dodgers doubled down on the opportunity to sign players of color from the Negro leagues. In the subsequent years after their pennant-winning season in 1947, they would sign Don Newcombe, Roy Campanella, and Jim Gilliam from the Negro leagues, adding to an already tremendous team. The Dodgers made the World Series in 1949, 1952, 1953, 1955, 1956, and 1959 (winning championships in 1955 and 1959) and were a historic pennant race away from making it in 1951, in part because they were the first to accept African American players. The 1951 season included a 14-game winning streak for the Dodgers against the Cardinals, the longest such streak in the rivalry.

1960s: Dodgers move West, the 1963 pennant race, and alternating World Series appearances

By their 1959 World Series victory, the Dodgers had moved from Brooklyn to Los Angeles the previous year. The Dodgers (and Giants) moving to California meant that the St. Louis Cardinals were no longer the furthest team West.

The rivalry renewed in 1963 when the Cardinals won 19 out of 20 games to almost overtake a large Dodger lead in the standings, although the Dodgers ultimately prevailed to win the pennant.[22] The streak reminded people (including Cardinal Hall of Famer Stan Musial, who started in 1941 and was in his final season in 1963) of the 1942 performance, despite the result.[22] From 1963 to 1968, either the Cardinals or Dodgers represented the National League in the World Series. 1963, 1965, and 1966 for Los Angeles and 1964, 1967, and 1968 for St. Louis. This streak nearly extended to 1962, but the Dodgers were beaten in the 1962 National League tie-breaker by the Giants in three games. By the 1960s, some of the best Cardinals players were of color, such as Bob Gibson, Lou Brock, Curt Flood, Orlando Cepeda, and Bill White, as the team was more open to accepting players of color at this time.[23][24]

For the Cardinals, the 1970s represented one of the dimmest period as a franchise as they finished the decade with a .496 winning percentage, the lowest until that point since the 1910s. The Dodgers maintained their postseason contender status, despite having a dip in performance in the late 1960s after the sudden retirement of Sandy Koufax following the 1966 World Series. In the 1970s, the Dodgers made three World Series (1974, 1977, 1978), but were defeated in all three. In some respect, the Cincinnati Reds took the Cardinals place as the Dodgers' Midwest foe, particularly throughout the mid 1970s.[25][26][27]

1980s: First official postseason match-up, Ozzie Smith, and Pedro Guerrero for John Tudor

Since divisional baseball started in 1969, the Cardinals and Dodgers have met six times in the postseason with two meetings in the NLCS falling in favor of the Cardinals. The two teams nearly met in the 1982 National League Championship Series, but a late Dodgers collapse in the regular season prevented that from happening (the Cardinals won the 1982 pennant and World Series).[28] In what could be considered biggest moment in the rivalry, the two teams finally played each other in the 1985 National League Championship Series for their first official postseason match-up. The series is best known for Ozzie Smith's dramatic walk-off home run in Game 5 and Jack Clark's series-winning home run in Game 6 at Dodger Stadium. To add extra significance, it was Smith's first career home-run batting left handed, as he was a switch-hitter, with all of his power coming from the right-side. Smith's Game 5 walk-off home run was voted the greatest moment in the history of Busch Stadium in 2005, and was the source of Jack Buck's famous call "Go crazy, folks! Go crazy!".[29]

In 1988, the two teams completed a controversial, yet beneficial blockbuster trade when John Tudor was traded to the Dodgers in exchange for Pedro Guerrero at the trade deadline.[30] The Dodgers won the World Series in 1988, as Tudor helped stabilize the Dodgers' rotation down the stretch, going 4-3 in nine starts with a 2.41 ERA, although he was mostly ineffective in the postseason. To complete the trade, Guerrero signed a three-year contract with the Cardinals. He enjoyed another All-Star season in 1989, hitting .311/.391/.477 with 17 home runs, 117 runs batted in and a league-leading 42 doubles and finished third in NL MVP voting. It was the third time he finished third in MVP voting in his career (the other two being 1982 and 1985). To date, this is the most significant trade between the Cardinals and Dodgers.

Two of the most successful National League managers of the 1980s, Whitey Herzog (left) and Tommy Lasorda (right)

Overall in the 1980s, the Dodgers and Cardinals dominated the National League. With timely hitting, good defense, and dominant pitching, the Dodgers won two World Series in the decade (1981, 1988), made the postseason four times (1981, 1983, 1985, 1988), and played in a one-game playoff in 1980. With the omnipresent threat of the stolen base and big time clutch hitting, the Cardinals reign of dominance earned three World Series appearances in 1982, 1985, and 1987, winning their lone championship of the decade in 1982. Both teams had what could be considered a lean period for a storied franchise after this era. The Dodgers did not seriously challenge in the National League West again until 1991 and did not make the postseason again until 1995. After 1987, the Cardinals did not make the postseason again until 1996, which by this time they were in the newly created National League Central division. Additionally, Hall of Fame managers Whitey Herzog and Tommy Lasorda retired by the time the rivalry sparked again.

The next significant moments of the rivalry came during the 1990s, which were a down period for both teams. On June 29, 1990, long-time Dodgers ace pitcher Fernando Valenzuela had his last great moment of his career when he threw a no-hitter against the St. Louis Cardinals just hours after the Oakland Athletics' Dave Stewart threw one. It was only time two no-hitters were thrown on the same day. On August 10, 1995, the Cardinals-Dodgers game at Dodger Stadium was forfeited after fans hurled giveaway baseballs onto the field in disgust over bad calls and player ejections throughout the game. The Dodgers had to forfeit their game against the Cardinals with one out in the bottom of the ninth. "It was unbelievable," Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda said at the time, according to the Los Angeles Times. "I've never seen anything like this. I'm disappointed in the ones who threw the balls, not the good fans."[31] On April 23, 1999, St. Louis Cardinals Fernando Tatís made baseball history when he hit two grand slams in one inning.[32] He is the only batter in MLB history to accomplish this feat.[33] Tatís hit both of his grand slams against starting pitcher Chan Ho Park of the Los Angeles Dodgers. With these two grand slams, Tatís also set a Major League record with eight runs batted in during a single inning.[34]

2000s-2010s: More postseason match-ups and Cardinals dominance

The Cardinals did not play the Dodgers again in the postseason until 2004 when the heavily favored Cardinals defeated the Dodgers in four games in the National League Division Series; however, the Cardinals lost the World Series to the Red Sox in a four game sweep. The 2004 NLDS was a microcosm of the Cardinals–Dodgers rivalry at this point, as St. Louis often dominated Los Angeles in the early-to-mid 2000s. The Dodgers did not even beat the Cardinals over a year and a half period (10 games from 2005 through 2007). This began to change around the time of their next meeting in 2009. In 2009, the Dodgers defeated the Cardinals in the National League Division Series in a three-game sweep. The series was highlighted by a Game 2 Matt Holliday gaffe in left-field when he lost a James Loney fly ball in the lights to put the tying run aboard. Later in the inning, pinch hitter Mark Loretta came through for Los Angeles with a single up the middle to give them the walk-off win and a commanding 2-0 series lead.

The Cardinals returned the favor, beating the Dodgers in the 2013 National League Championship Series in six games. Although from a Dodgers perspective, this series is remembered for Joe Kelly hitting Hanley Ramirez in the hand during the first inning of game one, which essentially took out the Dodgers best hitter for the entire series. Ramirez still played, but was bothered all series by the hit by pitch. Ironically, Kelly would later become a Dodger and a fan-favorite, helping them win a World Series in 2020.[35] The Cardinals and Dodgers met again during the 2014 National League Division Series with the Cardinals winning again and getting the better of 2013-2014 Cy Young award and 2014 Most Valuable Player winner Clayton Kershaw. Between the 2013 National League Championship Series and the 2014 National League Division Series, the Cardinals beat Kershaw in all four of his starts, highlighted by a series-winning home run from Matt Adams in Game 4 of the 2014 NLDS off a tiring Kershaw in the seventh inning. Game 1 also saw a heated altercation between Cardinals’ catcher Yadier Molina and Dodgers’ outfielder Yasiel Puig culminating in both benches clearing following a stray pitch from Cardinals’ pitcher Adam Wainwright.[36] The Dodgers season ended at the hands of the Cardinals in 2004, 2013, and 2014 and they often lost the regular season series, particularly in the 2000s.

2020s: Chris Taylor walk-off, Ohtani debut

From 2000 to 2020, the Cardinals and Dodgers won a combined three World Series (2006, 2011 for St. Louis and 2020 for Los Angeles) and appeared in combined seven World Series. They were also perennial postseason contenders, with Los Angeles making the postseason every year from 2013 to 2020. Meanwhile, St. Louis made the postseason 14 of 20 seasons from 2000 to 2020.

The two teams met again in the postseason in the 2021 National League Wild Card Game, with the Dodgers winning in the ninth on a two-run Chris Taylor walk-off home run.[37]

The next significant moment of the rivalry occurred during the start of the 2024 regular season, which saw the debut of baseball superstar Shohei Ohtani in a Dodgers uniform. It was the first time since 1998 St. Louis met Los Angeles on opening day and the first time since 1984 St. Louis opened the season in Los Angeles at Dodger Stadium. Before his start on opening day Miles Mikolas added some flame to a dormant rivalry when describing the Dodgers. “We’re not exactly a low payroll team, but you got the Dodgers playing checkbook baseball", he stated. "We’re going to be the hardest working group of Midwestern farmers we can be. It would be great to stick it to the Dodgers.” Mikolas would pitch poorly in his start, going just 4.1 innings and giving up 5 earned runs. The Dodgers won the opening series, 3-1.[38]

Season-by-season results

Cardinals vs. Dodgers Season-by-Season Results
1880s (Browns, 69–35–2)
Season Season series at St. Louis Browns at Brooklyn Atlantics/Grays/Bridegrooms Overall series Notes
1884 Browns 7–2–1 Browns, 5–0 Tie, 2–2–1 Browns
7–2–1
1885 Browns 12–4 Browns, 7–0 Browns, 5–4 Browns
19–6–1
Atlantics change their name to "Grays"
Browns tie pre-modern 1885 pre-modern World Series, though Browns claim game 2 forfeit didn't count and therefore claim the championship.
1886 Browns 13–7 Browns, 7–3 Browns, 6–4 Browns
32–13–1
Browns win 1886 pre-modern World Series
1887 Browns 16–4 Browns, 8–2 Browns, 8–2 Browns
48–17–1
Browns lose 1887 pre-modern World Series
1888 Tie 10–10–1 Browns, 6–4 Bridegrooms, 6–4–1 Browns
58–27–2
Grays change their name to "Bridegrooms"
Browns lose 1888 pre-modern World Series
1889 Browns 11–8 Browns, 6–4 Bridegrooms, 5–4 Browns
69–35–2
Bridegrooms' last season in the American Association, before switching to the National League.
Bridegrooms lose 1889 pre-modern World Series
1890s ((Bride)grooms/Superbas, 63–36–3)
Season Season series at St. Louis Browns/Perfectos at Brooklyn (Bride)grooms/Superbas Overall series Notes
1892 Grooms 9–5–1 Grooms, 3–4 Grooms, 5–2–1 Browns
74–44–3
Bridegrooms have since changed their name to "Grooms"
Browns join the National League
1893 Grooms 8–4 Browns, 4–2 Grooms, 6–0 Browns
78–52–3
1894 Grooms 8–4 Grooms, 4–2 Grooms, 4–2 Browns
82–60–3
1895 Grooms 9–3 Tie, 3–3 Grooms, 6–0 Browns
85–69–3
1896 Bridgegrooms 7–5 Browns, 4–2 Bridegrooms, 5–1 Browns
90–76–3
1897 Bridgegrooms 7–5 Tie, 3–3 Bridegrooms, 4–2 Browns
95–83–3
Grooms change their name to "Bridegrooms"
1898 Bridgegrooms 7–6–1 Browns, 4–3 Bridegrooms, 4–2–1 Browns
101–90–4
1899 Superbas 8–4–1 Superbas, 5–2–1 Superbas, 3–2 Perfectos
105–98–5
Browns change their name to "Perfectos."
Bridegrooms change their name to "Superbas," win 1899 NL pennant.
1900s (Superbas, 114–93–5)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Superbas Overall series Notes
1900 Superbas 13–7 Superbas, 7–3 Superbas, 6–4 Cardinals
112–111–5
Perfectos change their name to "Cardinals."
September 19 game was forfeited to the Dodgers, giving them a home win.
Superbas win 1900 NL pennant.
Superbas win the 1900 Chronicle-Telegraph Cup.
1901 Cardinals 11–9 Cardinals, 6–4 Tie, 5–5 Cardinals
123–120–5
1902 Superbas 10–9–2 Cardinals, 7–3–2 Superbas, 7–2 Cardinals
132–130–7
1903 Superbas 14–4–1 Superbas, 6–2–1 Superbas, 8–2 Superbas
144–136–8
1904 Cardinals 15–7 Cardinals, 9–2 Cardinals, 6–5 Tie
151–151–8
1905 Cardinals 12–10 Cardinals, 7–5 Tie, 5–5 Cardinals
163–161–8
1906 Superbas 13–8–1 Superbas, 6–5 Superbas, 7–3–1 Superbas
174–171–9
1907 Superbas 14–8 Superbas, 6–5 Superbas, 8–3 Superbas
188–179–9
1908 Superbas 13–9 Superbas, 7–4 Superbas, 6–5 Superbas
201–188–9
1909 Superbas 12–10–1 Cardinals, 7–4–1 Superbas, 8–3 Superbas
213–198–10
1910s (Superbas/(Trolley) Dodgers/Robins, 105–104–1)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Superbas/(Trolley) Dodgers/Robins Overall series Notes
1910 Superbas 12–10 Cardinals, 7–4 Superbas, 8–3 Superbas
225–208–10
1911 Cardinals 11–9–1 Trolley Dodgers, 5–4–1 Cardinals, 7–4 Trolley Dodgers
234–219–11
Superbas change name to "Trolley Dodgers"
1912 Trolley Dodgers 11–10 Cardinals, 8–3 Trolley Dodgers, 8–2 Trolley Dodgers
245–229–11
1913 Dodgers 13–7 Dodgers, 5–4 Trolley Dodgers, 8–3 Dodgers
258–236–11
Trolley Dodgers shorten name to "Dodgers"
1914 Cardinals 17–5 Cardinals, 10–1 Cardinals, 7–4 Robins
263–253–11
Dodgers change name to "Robins"
1915 Tie 11–11 Cardinals, 7–4 Robins, 7–4 Robins
274–264–11
1916 Robins 15–7 Robins, 6–5 Robins, 9–2 Robins
289–271–11
Robins lose 1916 World Series
1917 Cardinals 11–10 Cardinals, 8–3 Robins, 7–3 Robins
299–282–11
1918 Cardinals 11–8 Cardinals, 7–4 Tie, 4–4 Robins
307–293–11
1919 Robins 11–9 Cardinals, 6–4 Robins, 7–3 Robins
318–302–11
1920s (Cardinals, 119–101)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Robins Overall series Notes
1920 Robins 15–7 Robins, 7–3 Robins, 8–4 Robins
333–309–11
Cardinals move to Sportsman's Park
Robins lose 1920 World Series
1921 Cardinals 14–8 Cardinals, 9–2 Robins, 6–5 Robins
341–323–11
1922 Cardinals 14–8 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals, 6–5 Robins
349–337–11
1923 Cardinals 12–10 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 6–5 Robins
359–349–11
1924 Robins 15–7 Robins, 7–4 Robins, 8–3 Robins
374–356–11
1925 Tie 11–11 Cardinals, 8–3 Robins, 8–3 Robins
385–367–11
1926 Cardinals 15–7 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 9–2 Robins
392–382–11
Cardinals win 1926 World Series
1927 Cardinals 14–8 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals, 6–5 Robins
400–396–11
1928 Cardinals 13–9 Robins, 6–5 Cardinals, 8–3 Tie
409–409–11
Cardinals lose 1928 World Series
1929 Cardinals 12–10 Cardinals, 7–4 Robins, 6–5 Cardinals
421–419–11
1930s (Cardinals, 127–91–2)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Robins/Dodgers Overall series Notes
1930 Tie 11–11 Robins, 6–5 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals
432–430–11
Cardinals lose 1930 World Series
1931 Cardinals 12–10 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals
444–440–11
Cardinals win 1931 World Series
1932 Dodgers 14–8 Cardinals, 6–5 Robins, 9–2 Dodgers
454–452–11
Robins change their name to "Dodgers"
1933 Cardinals 12–9 Dodgers, 6–4 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals
464–463–11
1934 Cardinals 15–7 Cardinals, 7–4 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals
479–470–11
On June 21, Cardinals take a 467–466–11 series lead, a lead the Cardinals have not relinquished to this day.
Cardinals win 1934 World Series
1935 Cardinals 16–6 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals
495–476–11
1936 Cardinals 13–9 Cardinals, 6–4 Cardinals, 7–5 Cardinals
508–485–11
1937 Cardinals 15–7–1 Cardinals, 9–3 Cardinals, 6–4–1 Cardinals
523–492–12
1938 Cardinals 12–9–1 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 6–4–1 Cardinals
535–501–13
1939 Cardinals 13–9 Cardinals, 8–3 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals
548–510–13
1940s (Cardinals, 132–90–5)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn Dodgers Overall series Notes
1940 Cardinals 13–9–1 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 7–4–1 Cardinals
561–519–14
1941 Tie 11–11–1 Cardinals, 6–5–1 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals
572–530–15
Dodgers lose 1941 World Series
1942 Cardinals 13–9 Cardinals, 8–3 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals
585–539–15
Cardinals win 1942 World Series
1943 Cardinals 15–7 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals, 7–4 Cardinals
600–546–15
Cardinals lose 1943 World Series
1944 Cardinals 18–4 Cardinals, 10–1 Cardinals, 8–3 Cardinals
618–550–15
Cardinals win 1944 World Series
1945 Cardinals 13–9 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals, 7–4 Cardinals
631–559–15
1946 Cardinals 16–8 Cardinals, 9–3 Cardinals, 7–5 Cardinals
647–567–15
Cardinals win 1946 World Series
1947 Tie 11–11–1 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals, 6–5–1 Cardinals
658–578–16
Dodgers 2B Jackie Robinson becomes the first African-American player in MLB history.
Dodgers lose 1947 World Series
1948 Dodgers 12–10 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals, 6–5 Cardinals
668–590–16
1949 Cardinals 12–10–2 Dodgers, 6–5–1 Cardinals, 7–4–1 Cardinals
680–600–18
Dodgers lose 1949 World Series
1950s (Dodgers, 135–85)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
1950 Dodgers 12–10 Cardinals, 6–5 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals
690–612–18
1951 Dodgers 18–4 Dodgers, 9–2 Dodgers, 9–2 Cardinals
694–630–18
1952 Tie 11–11 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals, 7–4 Cardinals
705–641–18
Dodgers lose 1952 World Series
1953 Dodgers 15–7 Cardinals, 7–4 Dodgers, 11–0 Cardinals
712–656–18
Dodgers lose 1953 World Series
1954 Dodgers 14–8 Dodgers, 6–5 Dodgers, 8–3 Cardinals
720–670–18
1955 Dodgers 14–8 Cardinals, 6–5 Dodgers, 9–2 Cardinals
728–684–18
Dodgers win 1955 World Series
1956 Dodgers 16–6 Dodgers, 8–3 Dodgers, 8–3 Cardinals
734–700–18
Dodgers lose 1956 World Series
1957 Dodgers 12–10 Dodgers, 6–5 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals
744–712–18
1958 Tie 11–11 Cardinals, 7–4 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals
755–723–18
Dodgers relocate to Los Angeles, playing at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum
1959 Dodgers 12–10 Dodgers, 6–5 Dodgers, 6–5 Cardinals
765–735–18
Dodgers win 1959 World Series
1960s (Tie, 91–91)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
1960 Cardinals 12–10 Cardinals, 8–3 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals
777–745–18
1961 Dodgers 12–10 Cardinals, 6–5 Dodgers, 7–4 Cardinals
787–757–18
1962 Cardinals 11–7 Dodgers, 5–4 Cardinals, 7–2 Cardinals
798–764–18
Dodgers open Dodger Stadium. NL expansion reduces schedule to 18 meetings per year.
1963 Dodgers 12–6 Dodgers, 7–2 Dodgers, 5–4 Cardinals
804–776–18
1964 Dodgers 10–8 Cardinals, 5–4 Dodgers, 6–3 Cardinals
812–786–18
Cardinals win 1964 World Series
1965 Dodgers 12–6 Dodgers, 7–2 Dodgers, 5–4 Cardinals
818–798–18
Dodgers win 1965 World Series
1966 Dodgers 10–8 Dodgers, 6–3 Cardinals, 5–4 Cardinals
826–808–18
Cardinals open Busch Memorial Stadium
Dodgers lose 1966 World Series
1967 Cardinals 12–6 Cardinals, 7–2 Cardinals, 5–4 Cardinals
838–814–18
Cardinals win 1967 World Series
1968 Tie 9–9 Dodgers, 5–4 Cardinals, 5–4 Cardinals
847–823–18
Cardinals lose 1968 World Series
1969 Cardinals 9–3 Cardinals, 5–1 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
856–826–18
MLB's expansion and realignment place the Cardinals in the NL East and Dodgers in the NL West. New division alignment shortens meetings from 18 to 12 games.
1970s (Dodgers, 67–53)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
1970 Dodgers 7–5 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
861–833–18
1971 Tie 6–6 Tie, 3–3 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
867–839–18
1972 Dodgers 8–4 Dodgers, 4–2 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
871–847–18
1973 Dodgers 8–4 Tie, 3–3 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals
875–855–18
1974 Tie 6–6 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
881–861–18
Dodgers lose 1974 World Series
1975 Cardinals 7–5 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
888–866–18
1976 Dodgers 10–2 Dodgers, 4–2 Dodgers, 6–0 Cardinals
890–876–18
1977 Tie 6–6 Cardinals, 5–1 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals
896–882–18
Dodgers lose 1977 World Series
1978 Cardinals 7–5 Cardinals, 4–2 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
903–887–18
Dodgers lose 1978 World Series
1979 Tie 6–6 Tie, 3–3 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
909–893–18
1980s (Dodgers, 64–60)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
1980 Dodgers 7–5 Cardinals, 4–2 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals
914–900–18
1981 Tie 5–5 Tie, 3–3 Tie, 2–2 Cardinals
919–905–18
Strike-shortened season.
Dodgers win 1981 World Series
1982 Dodgers 7–5 Dodgers, 4–2 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
924–912–18
Cardinals win 1982 World Series
1983 Dodgers 9–3 Dodgers, 4–2 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals
927–921–18
1984 Tie 6–6 Tie, 3–3 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
933–927–18
1985 Dodgers 7–5 Tie, 3–3 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
938–934–18
Cardinals lose 1985 World Series
1985 NLCS Cardinals 4–2 3–0 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
942–936–18
1986 Dodgers 8–4 Dodgers, 4–2 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
946–944–18
1987 Cardinals 9–3 Cardinals, 5–1 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
955–947–18
On May 10, Dodgers come one game from ending the Cardinals' 53-season series lead (948–947–18), though are unable to overcome it. The Cardinals' series lead remains to this day.
Cardinals lose 1987 World Series
1988 Dodgers 7–5 Tie, 3–3 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
960–954–18
Dodgers win 1988 World Series
1989 Cardinals 9–3 Cardinals, 6–0 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
969–957–18
1990s (Cardinals, 55–52)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
1990 Dodgers 7–5 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
974–964–18
1991 Tie 6–6 Cardinals, 4–2 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
980–970–18
1992 Cardinals 8–4 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
988–974–18
1993 Tie 6–6 Dodgers, 5–1 Cardinals, 5–1 Cardinals
994–980–18
1994 Cardinals 4–2 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
998–982–18
MLB realignment shifts Cardinals into NL Central. Dodgers remain in NL West.
Strike-shortened season. Strike cancel postseason
1995 Dodgers 7–5 Dodgers, 4–2 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals
1003–989–18
Strike-shortened season
1996 Dodgers 8–4 Dodgers, 4–2 Dodgers, 4–2 Cardinals
1007–997–18
1997 Cardinals 6–5 Tie, 3–3 Cardinals, 3–2 Cardinals
1013–1002–18
1998 Cardinals 5–4 Cardinals, 4–2 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1018–1006–18
1999 Cardinals 6–3 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals
1024–1009–18
2000s (Cardinals, 46–27)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
2000 Cardinals 6–3 Cardinals, 4–2 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
1030–1012–18
2001 Tie 3–3 Cardinals, 2–1 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1033–1015–18
2002 Cardinals 4–2 Tie, 2–2 Cardinals, 2–0 Cardinals
1037–1017–18
2003 Dodgers 4–2 Dodgers, 2–0 Tie, 2–2 Cardinals
1039–1021–18
2004 Cardinals 4–2 Cardinals, 3–0 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1043–1023–18
2004 NLDS Cardinals 3–1 Cardinals, 2–0 Tie, 1–1 Cardinals
1046–1024–18
Cardinals lose 2004 World Series.
2005 Cardinals 5–2 Cardinals, 3–1 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
1051–1026–18
2006 Cardinals 7–0 Cardinals, 4–0 Cardinals, 3–0 Cardinals
1058–1026–18
Cardinals open Busch Stadium, win 2006 World Series
2007 Tie 3–3 Cardinals, 2–1 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1061–1029–18
2008 Cardinals 4–2 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
1065–1031–18
2009 Cardinals 5–2 Cardinals, 3–1 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
1070–1033–18
2009 NLDS Dodgers 3–0 Dodgers, 1–0 Dodgers, 2–0 Cardinals
1070–1036–18
2010s (Cardinals, 43–40)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
2010 Cardinals 4–3 Cardinals, 4–0 Dodgers, 3–0 Cardinals
1074–1039–18
2011 Dodgers 4–3 Dodgers, 3–0 Cardinals, 3–1 Cardinals
1077–1043–18
Cardinals win 2011 World Series
2012 Dodgers 6–5 Cardinals, 3–1 Dodgers, 5–2 Cardinals
1082–1049–18
2013 Dodgers 4–3 Dodgers, 3–1 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals
1085–1053–18
2013 NLCS Cardinals 4–2 Cardinals, 3–0 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1089–1055–18
Cardinals lose 2013 World Series
2014 Dodgers 4–3 Cardinals, 2–1 Dodgers, 3–1 Cardinals
1092–1059–18
2014 NLDS Cardinals 3–1 Cardinals, 2–0 Tie, 1–1 Cardinals
1095–1060–18
2015 Cardinals 5–2 Cardinals, 2–1 Cardinals, 3–1 Cardinals
1100–1062–18
2016 Dodgers 4–2 Dodgers, 2–1 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1102–1066–18
2017 Dodgers 4–3 Tie, 2–2 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1105–1070–18
Dodgers lose 2017 World Series
2018 Cardinals 4–3 Dodgers, 3–1 Cardinals, 3–0 Cardinals
1109–1073–18
Dodgers lose 2018 World Series
2019 Cardinals 4–3 Cardinals, 4–0 Dodgers, 3–0 Cardinals
1113–1076–18
2020s (Dodgers, 16–9)
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Overall series Notes
2021 Dodgers 4–3 Tie, 2–2 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1116–1080–18
2021 NLWC Dodgers 1–0 No games Dodgers, 1–0 Cardinals
1116–1081–18
2022 Dodgers 4–2 Dodgers, 2–1 Dodgers, 2–1 Cardinals
1118–1085–18
2023 Dodgers 4–3 Cardinals, 3–1 Dodgers, 3–0 Cardinals
1121–1089–18
2024 Dodgers 3–1 Upcoming, August 16–18 Dodgers, 3–1 Cardinals
1122–1092–18
Summary of Results
Season Season series at St. Louis Cardinals at Los Angeles Dodgers Notes
St. Louis Cardinals vs Brooklyn Dodgers Cardinals 744–712–18 Cardinals, 420–310–8 Dodgers, 402–324–10
St. Louis Cardinals vs Los Angeles Dodgers Dodgers 380–378 Cardinals, 205–176 Dodgers, 204–173
Regular season games Cardinals 1108–1082–18 Cardinals, 614–486–8 Dodgers, 596–494–10
Postseason games Cardinals 14–10 Cardinals, 10–1 Dodgers, 9–4
Postseason series Cardinals 4–2 Cardinals, 4–0–1 Dodgers, 4–0–2 NLWC: 2021
NLDS: 2004, 2009, 2014
NLCS: 1985, 2013
Overall Regular season and postseason Cardinals 1122–1092–18 Cardinals, 624–487–8 Dodgers, 605–498–10

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This page was last edited on 26 May 2024, at 15:12
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