To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Caddo County, Oklahoma

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Caddo County
The Southern Plains Indian Museum in Anadarko
The Southern Plains Indian Museum in Anadarko
Map of Oklahoma highlighting Caddo County
Location within the U.S. state of Oklahoma
Map of the United States highlighting Oklahoma

Oklahoma's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 35°11′N 98°23′W / 35.18°N 98.38°W / 35.18; -98.38
CountryUnited States
State Oklahoma
FoundedAugust 6, 1901
Named forCaddo Tribe
SeatAnadarko
Largest cityAnadarko
Area
 • Total1,290 sq mi (3,300 km2)
 • Land1,278 sq mi (3,310 km2)
 • Water12 sq mi (30 km2)  0.9%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2013)
29,594
 • Density23/sq mi (9/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional district3rd

Caddo County is a county located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. As of the 2010 census, the population was 29,600.[1] Its county seat is Anadarko.[2] Created in 1901 as part of Oklahoma Territory, the county is named for the Caddo tribe who were settled here on a reservation in the 1870s. Caddo County is immediately west of the seven-county Greater Oklahoma City metro area, and although is not officially in the metro area, it has many economic ties in this region.

YouTube Encyclopedic

  • 1/2
    Views:
    348
    2 728 491
  • ✪ 5-23-11 CADDO COUNTY, OKLAHOMA FUNNELS AND TORNADO
  • ✪ Harvest - Caddo County (6/29/13)

Transcription

Contents

History

Caddo County was organized on August 6, 1901 when the Federal Government allotted the Kiowa, Comanche, and Arapaho reservations and sold the surplus land to white settlers.[3] The reservation land was part of Oklahoma Territory until Oklahoma became a state on November 16, 1907. Part of its land was taken at statehood to form neighboring Grady County. Some additional land was taken in 1911 and also awarded to Grady County.[3]

Agriculture has been the mainstay of the local economy since its founding. The main crops were cotton, corn, wheat, alfalfa, broom corn, and kaffir corn. Poultry and livestock production have also been important. By 1960, Caddo County ranked first in Oklahoma for producing of peanuts, hogs and poultry.[3]

The first oil field (Cement Field) in the county was discovered in 1911, and oil production has remained important to the county economy since then. Smaller-scale booms in oil production occurred in the 1960s, 1970s and 1980s.[3]

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 1,290 square miles (3,300 km2), of which 1,278 square miles (3,310 km2) is land and 12 square miles (31 km2) (0.9%) is water.[4] The county mostly lies in the Gypsum Hills and the Red Bed plains physiographic areas. The extreme southwestern corner is in the Wichita Mountains. The county is drained by the Washita River and Pond and Sugar Creeks. Major reservoirs are Chickasha Lake, Ellsworth Lake, and Fort Cobb Lake,[3] Red Rock Canyon State Park near Hinton is notable for having the only remaining stand of native Caddo maple trees.

Major highways

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
191035,685
192034,207−4.1%
193050,77948.4%
194041,567−18.1%
195034,913−16.0%
196028,621−18.0%
197028,9311.1%
198030,9056.8%
199029,550−4.4%
200030,1502.0%
201029,600−1.8%
Est. 201629,557[5]−0.1%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010-2013[1]
Age pyramid for Caddo County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.
Age pyramid for Caddo County, Oklahoma, based on census 2000 data.

As of the census[10] of 2000, there were 30,150 people, 10,957 households, and 7,965 families residing in the county. The population density was 9/km² (24/sq mi). There were 13,096 housing units at an average density of 4/km² (10/sq mi). The racial makeup of the county was 65.55% White, 2.92% Black or African American, 24.28% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 2.70% from other races, and 4.36% from two or more races. 6.28% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 93.8% English, 4.5% Spanish and 1.2% Kiowa as their first language.

There were 10,957 households out of which 33.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.20% were married couples living together, 13.00% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.30% were non-families. 24.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.50% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the county, the population was spread out with 28.50% under the age of 18, 8.50% from 18 to 24, 26.00% from 25 to 44, 22.10% from 45 to 64, and 14.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.00 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $27,347, and the median income for a family was $32,118. Males had a median income of $26,373 versus $18,658 for females. The per capita income for the county was $13,298. About 16.70% of families and 21.70% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.00% of those under age 18 and 15.90% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

During the 20th century, Caddo County was a bellwether county: between 1912 and 2004, the county voted for the winner in every election but 1956 and 1988. However, it has become more conservative in recent years, with John McCain (2008), Mitt Romney (2012) and Donald Trump (2016) each receiving at list 64% of the county's vote.

Voter Registration and Party Enrollment as of January 15, 2019[11]
Party Number of Voters Percentage
Democratic 6,826 49.81%
Republican 5,010 36.56%
Others 1,868 13.42%
Total 13,704 100%
Presidential elections results
Presidential elections results[12]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 69.3% 6,482 25.9% 2,420 4.8% 446
2012 64.3% 5,687 35.8% 3,164
2008 65.3% 6,413 34.7% 3,404
2004 62.4% 6,491 37.6% 3,916
2000 52.5% 4,835 46.4% 4,272 1.1% 103
1996 35.4% 3,422 50.1% 4,844 14.5% 1,404
1992 31.9% 3,664 42.3% 4,861 25.8% 2,963
1988 46.1% 4,689 52.9% 5,387 1.0% 101
1984 60.1% 6,811 39.4% 4,463 0.6% 67
1980 54.1% 5,945 42.7% 4,695 3.2% 355
1976 34.0% 3,854 65.2% 7,382 0.8% 91
1972 70.4% 7,683 26.8% 2,921 2.8% 308
1968 43.7% 4,712 39.1% 4,212 17.2% 1,858
1964 33.3% 3,724 66.7% 7,447
1960 53.7% 5,920 46.4% 5,115
1956 47.5% 5,331 52.5% 5,884
1952 52.6% 6,834 47.4% 6,153
1948 31.9% 3,793 68.1% 8,110
1944 44.6% 5,529 55.2% 6,850 0.2% 24
1940 43.1% 6,304 56.5% 8,280 0.4% 61
1936 35.5% 5,205 63.8% 9,358 0.7% 106
1932 21.3% 2,972 78.7% 11,001
1928 64.3% 7,313 34.1% 3,885 1.6% 180
1924 46.0% 4,388 44.2% 4,211 9.8% 931
1920 53.2% 4,823 39.6% 3,594 7.2% 654
1916 36.8% 2,272 44.3% 2,735 19.0% 1,174
1912 40.4% 2,413 42.1% 2,514 17.6% 1,050

Economy

Caddo County is home to cattle ranching and significant wheat and peanut farm operations—with a few of the producers practicing environmentally friendly no-till or reduced tillage farming methods.[13]

There is also one winery and vineyard in the county (Woods and Waters Winery and Vineyard).

Communities

Redstone Baptist Church, north of the Apache Wye, Caddo County, Kiowa mission founded in the 19th century.
Redstone Baptist Church, north of the Apache Wye, Caddo County, Kiowa mission founded in the 19th century.

City

Towns

Unincorporated communities

NRHP sites

The following sites in Caddo County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

See also

References

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved November 8, 2013.
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on 2011-05-31. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  3. ^ a b c d e Wilson, Linda D. (2009). "Caddo County". Encyclopedia of Oklahoma History and Culture (online ed.). Oklahoma Historical Society. Retrieved April 16, 2015.
  4. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  5. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  6. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  8. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 18, 2015.
  10. ^ "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  11. ^ "Oklahoma Registration Statistics by County" (PDF). OK.gov. January 15, 2019. Retrieved 2019-02-27.
  12. ^ Leip, David. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved 2018-03-28.
  13. ^ Reducefarmcosts.com Archived 2011-07-15 at the Wayback Machine

External links

This page was last edited on 9 September 2019, at 18:01
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.