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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

CBL-FM
Cbc music toronto 2019.svg
CityToronto, Ontario
Broadcast areaGreater Toronto Area
Frequency94.1 MHz (FM)
BrandingCBC Music
Programming
Formatpublic broadcasting
Ownership
OwnerCanadian Broadcasting Corporation
CJBC, CBLA-FM, CJBC-FM
History
First air date
October 7, 1946
Former call signs
VE9EV (1946–1947)
CBC-FM (1947–1968)
[1][2][3]
Former frequencies
99.1 MHz (1946–1966)[1]
Call sign meaning
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Great Lakes[4]
Technical information
ClassC1
ERP38,000 watts
HAAT420.5 meters (1,380 ft)
Links
WebcastListen Live
WebsiteCBC Toronto

CBL-FM (94.1 MHz) is the flagship station of the CBC Music network. It is a non-commercial station, licensed to Toronto, Ontario, and is owned by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.

CBL-FM's studios and offices are located at the Canadian Broadcasting Centre, on Front Street West, while its transmitter is located atop the CN Tower.

History

Former logo adopted in February 2017 after the rebrand to CBC Music.
Former logo adopted in February 2017 after the rebrand to CBC Music.

CBL-FM was launched on October 7, 1946 with the callsign VE9EV, as an FM simulcast for 740 CBL. It was the corporation's second FM station behind VE9CB in Montreal (now CBFX-FM). In 1947, its callsign was changed to CBC-FM. The station originally broadcast at 99.1 MHz, but moved to 94.1 in 1966. (The 99.1 frequency was vacant until 1977, when it was assigned to the CKO all-news radio network. CKO ceased operations in 1989, and the frequency was again vacant until it was assigned to CBLA-FM, co-owned with CBL-FM.)

As part of an 18-month trial for a nationwide FM network, CBC-FM began airing separate programming in 1960, playing mostly classical music along with the corporation's other English-language FM stations (CBM-FM Montreal and CBO-FM Ottawa). CBC-FM returned to simulcasting CBL in 1962, but resumed separate programming again in 1964. The station was renamed CBL-FM in 1968. The FM network was rebranded CBC Stereo on November 3, 1975, CBC Radio Two in 1997 and CBC Music in 2018, as it shifted away from mostly classical music, to a mix of adult album alternative, classical, jazz and other genres.

Rebroadcasters

Rebroadcasters of CBL-FM
City of license Identifier Frequency RECNet CRTC Decision
Huntsville CBL-FM-1 106.9 FM Query 2005-264
Kingston CBBK-FM 92.9 FM Query
London CBBL-FM 100.5 FM Query
Orillia CBL-FM-3 90.7 FM Query 2002-456
Owen Sound CBL-FM-4 97.1 FM Query
Paris CBL-FM-2 90.7 FM Query 99-1
Peterborough CBBP-FM 103.9 FM Query

On February 15, 1979, the CRTC approved the CBC's application to operate a new FM transmitter in Belleville on 94.3 MHz (CBBB-FM)[5] and on May 7, 1979, the CRTC also approved the CBC's application to operate a new FM transmitter in Brockville on 104.9 MHz (CBBA-FM), to rebroadcast the programming originating from CBL-FM Toronto.[6] Neither of these transmitters in Belleville and Brockville were implemented[7] and the frequencies were awarded to other broadcasters.[8][9]

On June 28, 2005, the CRTC approved the CBC's application to change the frequency of its transmitter CBL-FM-1 Huntsville from 104.7 MHz (channel 284C1) to 106.9 MHz (channel 295C1). This change of frequency was to eliminate significant interference with a local radio station CFBK-FM operating at 105.5 MHz in Huntsville.

References

  1. ^ a b "CBL-FM". www.broadcasting-history.ca.
  2. ^ "4 stations, 1 network licensed in Canada" (PDF). Broadcasting. 2 November 1959. p. 105.
  3. ^ "International Shorts" (PDF). Broadcasting. 23 July 1956.
  4. ^ Meaning of call letters
  5. ^ CRTC 79-169
  6. ^ CRTC 79-325
  7. ^ CRTC 90-147
  8. ^ Decision CRTC 92-763
  9. ^ Decision CRTC 2003-15

External links

This page was last edited on 11 November 2020, at 18:02
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