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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Butyronitrile[1]
Names
IUPAC name
Butanenitrile[3]
Other names
  • 1-Cyanopropane[2]
  • Propyl cyanide[2]
  • n-Butyronitrile[2]
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
1361452
ChEBI
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.365
EC Number
  • 203-700-6
MeSH N-butyronitrile
RTECS number
  • ET8750000
UN number 2411
Properties
C4H7N
Molar mass 69.107 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless
Odor Sharp and suffocating[2]
Density 794 mg mL−1
Melting point −111.90 °C; −169.42 °F; 161.25 K
Boiling point 117.6 °C; 243.6 °F; 390.7 K
0.033 g/100 mL
Solubility soluble in benzene
miscible in alcohol, ether, dimethylformamide
Vapor pressure 3.1 Pa
190 μmol Pa−1 kg−1
-49.4·10−6 cm3/mol
1.38385
3.5
Thermochemistry
134.2 J K−1 mol−1
−6.8–−4.8 kJ mol−1
−2.579 MJ mol−1
Hazards
GHS pictograms
GHS02: Flammable
GHS06: Toxic
GHS Signal word Danger
H225, H301, H311, H331
P210, P261, P280, P301+310, P311
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
Flammability code 3: Liquids and solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions. Flash point between 23 and 38 °C (73 and 100 °F). E.g. gasolineHealth code 3: Short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury. E.g. chlorine gasReactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g. liquid nitrogenSpecial hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
3
3
0
Flash point 18 °C (64 °F; 291 K)
488 °C (910 °F; 761 K)
Explosive limits 1.65%–?[2]
Lethal dose or concentration (LD, LC):
50 mg kg−1 (oral, rat)
NIOSH (US health exposure limits):
PEL (Permissible)
none[2]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 8 ppm (22 mg/m3)[2]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.[2]
Related compounds
Related alkanenitriles
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is ☑Y☒N ?)
Infobox references

Butyronitrile or butanenitrile or propyl cyanide, is a nitrile with the formula C3H7CN. This colorless liquid is miscible with most polar organic solvents.

Uses

Butyronitrile is mainly used as a precursor to the poultry drug amprolium.[4]

Synthesis

Butyronitrile is prepared industrially by the ammoxidation of n-butanol:

C3H7CH2OH + NH3 + O2 → C3H7CN + 3 H2O

Occurrence in space

Butyronitrile has been detected in the Large Molecule Heimat.[5]

References

  1. ^ Merck Index, 11th Edition, 1597
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. "#0086". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  3. ^ "N-butyronitrile - Compound Summary". PubChem Compound. USA: National Center for Biotechnology Information. 26 March 2005. Identification. Retrieved 12 June 2012.
  4. ^ Peter Pollak, Gérard Romeder, Ferdinand Hagedorn, Heinz-Peter Gelbke "Nitriles" Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry 2002, Wiley-VCH, Weinheim. doi:10.1002/14356007.a17_363
  5. ^ "Two highly complex organic molecules detected in space". Royal Astronomical Society. 21 April 2009. Retrieved 29 September 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 19 September 2019, at 11:52
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