To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Brett Bodine
Brett Bodine Lowe's.jpg
Bodine in 1996
Born (1959-01-11) January 11, 1959 (age 62)
Chemung, New York
Awards1986 NASCAR Busch Series Most Popular Driver
Inducted into Modified Hall of Fame
NASCAR Cup Series career
480 races run over 18 years
Best finish12th (1990)
First race1986 World 600 (Charlotte)
Last race2003 MBNA Armed Forces Family 400 (Dover)
First win1990 First Union 400 (North Wilkesboro)
Wins Top tens Poles
1 61 5
NASCAR Xfinity Series career
77 races run over 6 years
Best finish2nd (1986)
First race1985 Budweiser 200 (Bristol)
Last race1999 Kmart 200 (Rockingham)
First win1985 Miller 200 (Martinsville)
Last win1986 Winn-Dixie 500 (Martinsville)
Wins Top tens Poles
5 52 16
NASCAR Camping World Truck Series career
3 races run over 1 year
Best finish66th (1998)
First race1998 Chevy Trucks Challenge (Orlando)
Last race1998 NAPA 250 (Martinsville)
Wins Top tens Poles
0 0 0
Statistics current as of April 15, 2013.

Brett Elias Bodine III (born January 11, 1959) is an American former stock car racing driver, former driver of the pace car in Cup Series events, and current NASCAR employee. Brett is the younger brother of 1986 Daytona 500 winner Geoff Bodine and the older brother of 2006 and 2010 NASCAR Camping World Truck Series champion Todd Bodine. He was born in Chemung, New York.[1] Brett has been named one of the 50 greatest NASCAR modified drivers of all time,[2] was the runner-up for the 1986 Xfinity Series championship,[3] and collected a total of five Xfinity Series wins and sixteen pole positions.  Brett made 480 Cup series starts with one win and five pole positions.  He has led over 1,000 career laps in both the NASCAR Cup series and the NASCAR Xfinity series.[4]

Early life

Bodine attended Alfred State College and received an associate's degree in mechanical engineering before he became a professional race car driver. He began in hobby stock races at the Chemung Speedrome (owned by his parents) in 1977.[5] In 1979 Brett started racing a part-time schedule in the NASCAR Modified Nation Championship series, placing 35th in the final standings.[6] In the 1980 Brett moved up to 24th in the final standings with a best finish of third at Stafford Motor speedway, still driving a part time schedule.[7] In 1983 Brett picked up his first National Championship win at Stafford Motor Speedway while placing 7th in the final standings.[8] He also placed 5th in the Northeast Region of the NASCAR Winston Weekly Racing series with 6 wins in 54 starts. In 1984 Brett picked up another National Championship win, this time at Oxford Maine.[9] He also placed 12th in the Northeast Region of the NASCAR Winston Weekly Racing series with 3 wins in 37 starts and helped his car-owner secure the Stafford Motor Speedway track championship.[10][2] At the conclusion of the 1984 season Brett moved south to go to work for Rick Hendrick, whom his brother Geoff was driving for at the time.[11]

NASCAR beginnings

While working for Rick, Brett found time to make a handful of modified starts in 1985 and won the most prestigious event of the season, the Race of Champions at Pocono.[12] The 1985 season also saw Bodine make his debut in the NASCAR Xfinity Series in the #15 Pontiac at Bristol. The small team did not have a pit crew and had to do the whole race on a single set of tires but Brett managed to qualify 7th and finish 12th in his debut race.[13] Brett's breakout race in NASCAR came when rain forced a scheduling conflict between the Xfinity race at Martinsville and the Cup Series race. Geoff Bodine (who was driving full-time for Hendrick in the Cup Series)  was scheduled to drive in the Xfinity race and Brett got the chance to drive Rick Hendrick's #5 Pontiac as a last minute fill-in.[11]  Brett started second and won the race in only his second career start.[14] This was the first win for Hendrick with the Levi Garrett sponsorship and resulted in Brett getting funding from Levi Garrett to run 11 additional races that season.[11] Brett's under the lights win at Bristol win was the first Xfinity series race to be televised live in prime time.[15] By the end of the 1985 season Brett had made thirteen starts with three poles, three wins, 7 top fives, and 10 top tens.[16]

Bodine's success in the part-time Busch series ride in 1985 lead to a full time opportunity in 1986, driving the No. 00 Thomas Brothers Old Country Ham Oldsmobile for Howard Thomas. Rick Hendrick was not interested in fielding a full time Busch series team but helped Brett bring an associate sponsorship from Exxon over to the 00 team.[11] Brett scored two early-season pole positions at Rockingham and Martinsville, but 3 DNFs in the season's first 5 races left Brett 14th in points.  Brett then recorded 9 straight top 10 finishes and another pole at Dover to move to 2nd in the points standings. This streak was followed by back to back DNFs at IRP and South Boston and dropped Brett to 7th in points after the season's 16th race. Brett rallied to finish the season with 15 straight top 10 finishes including wins at Bristol and the season finale at Martinsville.[17] After Jack Ingram was suspended for two races for driving backwards on track, the championship came down to a battle between Brett and Larry Pearson. Brett briefly lead the standings after the season's 28th race, and with three races to go (Hickory, Rockingham, and Marintsiville) trailed by 12 points. Brett qualified on the pole at Hickory but the race was cancelled because, allegedly, the promoter did not want to pay the purse and intentionally damaged the track which cost Brett the chance to gain ground on Pearson.[18] At the season finale, Brett qualified on pole and won the race but ended up placing 2nd to Larry Pearson by just 7 points in the final standings while totaling 16 top fives and 24 top tens to go along with his series-best 8 pole positions.[19] Brett was voted the series most popular driver at the conclusion of the season.[20]  In addition to his full time Xfinity Series schedule, Bodine made four modified starts in 1986, winning two, both of which were NASCAR Modified National Championship events held at Martinsville.[21] Bodine also made his Winston Cup Debut in 1986, driving the No. 2 Exxon Chevy in the Coca-Cola 600. Bodine started 32nd and finished 18th in the Rick Hendrick owned entry, earning the bonus money for being the highest finishing rookie driver.[22]

Bodine again drove the full Busch series schedule in the No. 00 Oldsmobile in 1987.  Although he failed to find victory lane, he accumulated 5 poles, 8 top fives, 17 top tens, and finished 3rd in the championship.[23]  In May for the 7th Cup Series race of the season at North Wilksboro Bodine was chosen to replace the injured Terry Labonte on the pace lap in Junior Johnson's #11 Budweiser Chevy.[24] Despite starting from the rear of the field after the driver change, he managed to finish in 8th place.[25] Brett also replaced Labonte on the pace laps the next week at Bristol. Again starting from the rear of the field, Brett ran as high as 2nd and finished in 9th place.[26] While Terry Labonte is credited with the finishes due to the NASCAR rules regarding driver changes at the time, Bodine's success as a fill-in driver lead to a ride for 14 Cup races in Hoss Ellington's part time No. 1 Bulls-Eye Barbecue Sauce Chevy.  In Brett's first event with the Ellington team he qualified on pole for the Winston Open and placed 6th.[27] He returned to Charlotte the next weekend and qualified 9th for the 600 and lead 17 laps (the first cup laps lead of his career) but was collected in a wreck while running in the top 10 and eventually fell out of the race with an engine issue.[28] At Daytona Brett qualified 7th, lead a lap, and finished a season-best 11th, the first lead lap finish of his cup career.[29] For the season he had 5 top 10 qualifying efforts in the #1 car and 5 top 20 finishes.[30]

Moving up

Bodine's 1989 Winston Cup car
Bodine's 1989 Winston Cup car

In 1988, Bodine moved to the Cup series full-time for Bud Moore Engineering driving the No. 15 Crisco Thunderbird.  In the Coca-Cola 600 at Charlotte Brett led the race 5 times for a total of 96 laps before dropping a cylinder late in the race and getting passed for the lead by race winner Darrell Watrip with 31 laps to go and ultimately finishing 4th.[31]  In the Oakwood Homes 500, also at Charlotte, Brett led the race 3 times for a total of 50 laps before getting passed for the lead by race winner Rusty Wallace with 12 laps to go and ultimately finishing 3rd.[32]  The team was plagued by engine issues all season, falling out of races 7 times while fighting through engine issues in others.[33] For the season Bodine posted 5 top-10 finishes and finished 20th in points.[34]  Brett was not eligible for the Rookie of the Year award in 1988 (which was won by Ken Bouchard who finished 25th in points with 1 top 10) as he had run too many races as a part time driver in 1987.[35]

Bodine returned to Budd Moore's team in 1989 driving the No. 15 Motorcraft Ford. Brett recorded a top 5 finish at Michigan and a total of 6 top tens, moving up one spot to finish the season 19th in points.[36] He also placed 2nd in the Winston Open, just missing out on making the All-Star Race.[37]  Overall, Brett's performance improved in his sophomore campaign as Brett's average finished improved by three spots. Late in the 1989 season, Brett made the decision to leave Bud Moore's team due to that team's sponsorship uncertainty for the 1990 season.[38] Brett also had disagreements with Bud Moore on the type of chassis that the team was using (rear steer vs. front steer).[39]

Bodine's breakout season came in 1990 driving the No. 26 Quaker State Buick Regal for champion drag racer Kenny Bernstein and crew chief Larry McReynolds. Bodine won his first Cup Series race in the 7th race of the season at North Wilkesboro Speedway,[40] which came under some controversy as some felt that Darrell Waltrip was robbed of the win. Brett had led 63 laps in the middle of the race and then re-took the lead on lap 318 after short pitting on a round of green flag pit stops.  When the caution came out on lap 321, the pace car mistakenly picked up Dale Earnhardt as the race leader, putting Brett almost a full lap in front of the entire field. During the ensuing confusion of a 17 lap caution flag (NASCAR did not have electronic scoring at the time) Bodine was able to make a pit stop for fresh tires without losing any positions. When NASCAR reset the lineup with Bodine as the leader, he led the final 83 laps of the race (a race-high 146 laps overall) to take the victory.  "We messed up," said Chip Williams, NASCAR's public relations director. "By throwing the caution on the second-place car, it kept Bodine in the lead. He slipped into the pits and came out without losing the lead because the pace car was keeping the second-place car back. We messed up by picking up the wrong car. It was a judgment call, and you can't overrule a judgment call."[41] Despite the controversy, the win stood and would prove to be Bodine's only career cup series win, the final cup series win for Buick, the final win for Bernstein's team, the first oval win for Larry McReynolds, and the only oval track victory for Bernstein's team.  From Dover in 1989 through Talladega in 1990, Brett was running at the finish of 16 consecutive races, the longest streak in the Cup Series at the time.  Brett made his first appearance in the All-Star race in 1990 and won his first pole position at the fall event at Charlotte Motor Speedway.[42]  At the conclusion of 1990 Brett was a career-best 12th in the championship standings with 5 top five finishes (both Wilksboro races, Pocono, Watkins Glen, and Martinsville) and a total of 9 top ten finishes.[43]

After having improved his average finish in each of his cup seasons to date Brett returned to the King Racing No. 26 car in 1991 with high hopes.[4]  Unfortunately, crew chief McReynolds left the team after the season's 4th race at Atlanta to join Davey Alison at Robert Yates Racing.[44] McReynolds was replaced by Clyde Booth.[45] In the season's 7th race, Brett had a strong run in his attempt to win back to back First Union 400s at North Wilksboro. Brett started from the pole position and lead 103 of the race's first 218 laps.  On lap 219, as the race leader, Brett was wrecked by the lapped car of Ricky Rudd on a restart, ending his day.[46]  Even with the crew chief change and the wreck at Wilksboro, Brett was 15th in points after placing 11th in the 9th race of the season.  However, the 26 team struggled with reliability issues for the remainder of 1991, falling out of 10 of the season's final 20 races due to engine failures.[47]  Bodine managed a strong run at the fall Martinsville race, leading a total of 59 laps from the 2nd starting position before getting passed for the lead by race winner Harry Gant with 47 laps to go and finishing 2nd.[48]  Brett made his 2nd consecutive appearance in the All-Star race in 1991. For the season Brett had 2 top five (both at Martinsville) and six top 10 finishes but the reliability issues pushed the team down to 19th in the championship standings.[49]

For 1992 the No. 26 team switched from Buick to Ford and Donnie Richeson, Brett's brother in law at the time, came on as the team's crew chief.  Bodine won the poll at Dover and recorded top five finishes at Darlington and Martinsville.[50] In the spring race at Martinsville he qualified 3rd and took the race lead with 36 laps remaining but a broken rear axle with 27 laps remaining dropped Brett to 8th place, two laps down, at the finish.[51]  In the fall race at Martinsville Brett led a total of 65 laps before getting passed for the lead by race winner Geoff Bodine with 43 laps to go and finishing 3rd.[52]  From Sonoma through Phoenix in 1992, Brett was running at the finish of 17 consecutive races, tied for the longest streak in the Cup Series at the time. Brett also qualified on pole and finished 6th in the Winston Open.[53]  For the season Brett totaled a career-best 13 top ten finishes, a career best average start of 8.1 (2nd best in the Cup series for 92), and a career best average finish of 15.4 en route to 15th place in the overall standings.[4]

1993 saw Bodine register pole positions at Wilksboro and Michigan, a runner-up finish in the Southern 500 at Darlington, additional top five finishes at Pocono and Richmond, and a total of 9 top ten finishes.[54]  Brett also finished 3rd in the Winston Open to qualify for the All Star Race for the 3rd time and placed a career-best 10th in that race.[55]  Brett crashed in qualifying for Dover and was forced to miss the race due to a broken wrist and a small brain bruise.  He returned to race again the next week at Martinsville and placed 20th in the championship standings.[56]

In 1994 Bodine finished 2nd in the season opening Busch Clash.[57]  Brett had his best race of the season in the Inaugural Brickyard 400 running in the top 5 throughout the race, leading 10 laps, and placing 2nd (His 5th career 2nd-place finish) after infamously tangling with brother Geoff while battling for the lead in the second half of the race.[58] For the season Brett recorded a total of 6 top 10 finishes, and ended up 19th in the championship standings.[59] In his 5 seasons driving the No. 26 Quaker State car Bodine posted a total of 5 poles, 1 win, 13 top fives, and 43 top tens while finishing no worse than 20th in the final standings.

For 1995 he signed with Junior Johnson piloting the Lowe's Ford Thunderbird with crew chief Mike Beam. The team had been dominate on the restrictor plate tracks in past years and the #11 car was again fast in Daytona 500 practice. Things took a bad turn when the team was found with an illegal engine manifold during pre-qualifying inspection at Daytona, resulting in a then-record $45,100 fine.[60] The revised engine was not nearly as fast and the team needed a provisional to make the race. Amid rumors of Johnson selling his team, Mike Beam left following the 10th race of the season and took all but two crew members with him.[61] Bodine continued on as the driver with Dean Combs coming on as crew chief, managing top ten finishes at Wilksboro and Pocono, and finished twentieth in points.[62] 1995 would be Brett's 8th consecutive top twenty season in the Cup series. Bodine easily bested the performance of his Junior Johnson Racing teammate, the 27 car driven primarily by Elton Sawyer, which placed 37th in points with 5 DNQs and no top 10s in 1995.[63]

Owner/driver

1997 car
1997 car

After the 1995 season, Johnson sold the team to Bodine and his wife Diane to form Brett Bodine Racing. In a unique arrangement, the Lowes sponsorship ($4.2 million) for 1996 was paid directly to Johnson to purchase the team while Brett ran the team out of his pocket for the inaugural season.[64]  Bodine was reunited with crew chief Donnie Richeson and scored a top ten finish at Daytona in July, but failed to qualify for a late season race at Martinsville while placing 24th in the standings with 8 top 20 finishes.[65]  Bodine's struggles as a first time owner/driver during the 1996 season were documented in the book Wide Open.[64]

After Lowe's left to become the sponsor for a new team at Richard Childress Racing, he signed Catalyst Communications as a primary sponsor to a three-year, $15 million deal for 1997 and beyond.[64] The 1997 season started well for the #11 Close Call Ford with top tens at Bristol and Sonoma and a total of 6 top twenties in the first 9 races.  This strong start propelled Bodine to 16th in the points standings.[66] Troubles erupted when Catalyst stopped paying its sponsorship fees, leading to a lawsuit,[67] with Bodine eventually removing all sponsorship decals from the car. The lack of funding took its toll on the team as Bodine failed to qualify for a late season race at Rockingham and the team slipped all the way down to 29th in the final standings, although his final position was still better than the new Lowe's team which placed 30th with driver Mike Skinner.[68]

For 1998 Bodine found reliable sponsorship from Paychex and his Ford Taurus, although the $3 million per year deal was significantly less than that of top teams.[69] He qualified for every race for the first time as an owner/driver, collected 11 top 20 finishes with a season's best 11th-place finish at Bristol and Talladega, and placed 25th in the final standings.[70] Brett was running at the finish of the first 23 races of the 1998 season, tied for the longest streak to start the season. Paychex returned in 1999 but Bodine was unable to carry the momentum of the previous year and slipped to 35th in the standings with just 3 top 20 finishes, including a season's best 12th at Bristol, while failing to qualify for 2 races.[71]

Brett Bodine signed Ralphs Supermarkets to sponsor his car for 2000, and sold half the team to businessman Richard Hilton. The latter deal fell through, but while he was still able to keep Ralphs as a sponsor, the failed buy-out put the team behind in its preparation for the season. Brett struggled and failed to qualify for 5 of the season's first 21 races, falling all the way to 40th in the point standings. Things started to improve after Mike Hillman came on as crew chief mid-season. Bodine qualified for the season's final 13 races with 4 top 20 finishes, including a season's best 14th at Homestead, and finished the season 35th in points.[72]  Brett also set the track record at Indianapolis Motor Speedway during second round qualifying for the Brickyard 400.  This track record would stand until Tony Stewart went faster during qualifying in 2002. Brett became the first Cup series driver to start wearing the HANS device in 2000.[73]

Sole survivor

By 2001, Brett Bodine was the only remaining owner/driver competing full-time in the NASCAR Cup Series. While common just a few years earlier, single-car owner/driver teams had generally become uncompetitive in NASCAR as the sport became increasingly dependent on engineering, testing data, and sponsorship dollars.  Darrell Waltrip's #17 team had fallen from top 10 placings in the 1991, 1992, and 1994 standings to 29th place in 1996; Waltrip would sell his team partway into the 1998 season after his struggles continued in 1997 and 1998.[74] Ricky Rudd's #10 team had fallen from 6th place in the 1996 standings to 31st place in 1999 even with consistent sponsorship from Tide; Rudd sold his team following the 1999 season.[75]  Bill Elliott's #94 team had fallen from 8th place in the 1995 and 1997 standings to 21st place in 1999 even with consistent sponsorship from McDonald's; Elliott would sell his team following another disappointing performance in 2000.[76] His older brother, Geoffrey Bodine's #7 team had fallen from 16th place in the 1995 standings to 27th place in 1998; Geoff sold his team following the 1998 season.[77]

Ralphs returned as the primary sponsor and Bodine added RedCell Batteries as a major associate for 2001. The #11 Ford with Mike Hillman again serving as crew chief qualified for all of the races, posted top ten finishes at Daytona and Loudon, recorded 9 top 20 finishes, and moved up five positions to 30th in the final standings.[78] RedCell batteries stopped paying their sponsorship bills mid-season and Bodine signed Wells Fargo as a major associate sponsor.  From Charlotte in 2000 through Darlington in 2001, Brett was running at the finish of 31 consecutive races, the longest streak in the Cup Series.[79]  Brett Bodine Racing also expanded to a two-car team for the first time in its history, fielding the No. 09 Ford for older brother Geoff, who himself was struggling to maintain his Winston Cup career, in two races with a best finish of 27th.  Brett also fielded an Xfinity series team in 2 races, qualifying for 1, for nephew Josh Richeson.[80] Ralphs, however, decided not to return as the sponsor of the team following the season.

Hooters car
Hooters car

With no major sponsors Bodine received sponsorship from minor sponsors such as Wells Fargo, Timberland Pro, and Dura Lube. Three races into the season Hooters was signed to a deal, although at this point Bodine's team was once again well behind in development. Crew chief Mike Hillman and several other team members had left due to worries about not being able to run the full season without primary sponsorship.[81] Brett had four top 20 finishes, including a season's best 13th at Talladega, but failed to qualify for four late season races and finished 36th in the points.[82] Brett also fielded an Xfinity series team in 9 races (qualifying for 7) for nephew Josh Richeson, with a best finish of 28th.[80]

Hooters returned in 2003, but with less funding than they had provided the previous season. With no major associate sponsors, Brett planned a limited schedule for 2003, attempting 9 (and qualifying for 6) of the season's first 13 races in his #11 Ford. Brett also drove at Darlington in the #57 CLR Ford for Ted Campbell (a race that Bodine's #11 team did not enter). Bodine's best finish of 24th was achieved at Bristol with a special paint scheme on the #11 car commemorating 10 years since Alan Kulwicki's plane crash.[83] Brett placed 4th in the Winston Open, just missing out on qualifying for the All-Star race.[84] Early in the 2003 season Bodine became involved in a difficult time during a divorce from his wife and team co-owner Diane. The dispute lead Bodine to file a restraining order against his wife, whom he alleges hit and threatened to ruin him financially.[85] Just before the race at Michigan, Hooters withdrew sponsorship from the Bodine racing team. That same weekend, Bodine was seriously injured in a practice accident after running over a piece of debris that cut a right front tire. The impact was violent, knocking Brett unconscious, and he suffered a broken collar bone and damaged teeth. Geoff replaced Brett as the driver in the final race for the #11 Hooters car.[86] He recovered from his injuries and returned with a one race ride with the struggling Morgan-McClure Motorsports, but the car failed to make the field (Mike Skinner, Robert Pressley, Stacy Compton, and Kevin Lepage also had DNQs in the #4 car in 2003).[87] With no major sponsorship for his team and most of his employees laid off, Bodine attempted to run at Indy in a fan sponsored "Brick Car" where, for $500, fans would get their name on the car.  The program was a success and Bodine also picked up a sponsorship from US Micro Corporation. Bodine's qualifying lap tied with Dale Earnhardt Jr. for 36th fastest of the 52 cars making attempts but the tie-break went to Dale by virtue of him being higher in points and as a part time team, Bodine did not have any provisionals available (starting positions 37-43), so he failed to make the field. Rumors of a sponsor for 2004 and beyond surfaced, but nothing panned out and the team was sold. Unable to find a sponsor for his team or a ride with another team, Bodine decided to retire from driving. For his 18-year Winston Cup career Bodine started 480 races with 5 poles, 1 win, 16 top fives, and 61 top tens while winning over 13 million dollars in prize money. In the Busch Series Bodine started 77 races with 16 poles, 5 wins, 31 top fives, and 52 top tens. Brett led more than 1,000 laps in both the Busch Series (1,194) and in the Cup Series (1,040).[4] In the modifieds Brett had 5 wins on NASCAR's modified tour in addition to his many modified wins at the regional level, with him being named one of the 50 greatest modified drivers of all time.

To the NASCAR office

Bodine went to work for NASCAR in 2004 as the director of cost research at the R&D center, working as a liaison between NASCAR and the race teams on cost reduction efforts. Brett also did all of the driving for NASCAR's Car of Tomorrow prototype. While continuing to work in the R&D center on projects including the Touring Series Spec Engine and the Xfinity Series Composite Body, Brett drove the Cup Series pace car on race day from 2004 to 2018. Currently Brett works as the chairman of the Driver Approval Committee.[88]

Motorsports career results

NASCAR

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

Winston Cup Series

NASCAR Winston Cup Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 NWCC Pts
1986 Hendrick Motorsports 2 Chevy DAY RCH CAR ATL BRI DAR NWS MAR TAL DOV CLT
18
RSD POC MCH DAY POC TAL GLN MCH BRI DAR RCH DOV MAR NWS CLT CAR ATL RSD 92nd 109
1987 Ellington Racing 1 Chevy DAY CAR RCH ATL DAR NWS BRI MAR TAL CLT
21
DOV
14
POC
34
RSD
38
MCH
22
POC
22
TAL
38
GLN MCH
21
BRI DAR
20
RCH DOV
13
MAR NWS CLT
32
CAR
41
RSD ATL
15
32nd 1271
Buick DAY
11
1988 Bud Moore Engineering 15 Ford DAY
35
RCH
27
CAR
27
ATL
9
DAR
15
BRI
17
NWS
13
MAR
27
TAL
19
CLT
4
DOV
31
RSD
40
POC
35
MCH
27
DAY
42
POC
20
TAL
28
GLN
23
MCH
6
BRI
25
DAR
17
RCH
11
DOV
22
MAR
10
CLT
3
NWS
17
CAR
29
PHO
43
ATL
27
20th 2828
1989 DAY
29
CAR
34
ATL
33
RCH
28
DAR
14
BRI
30
NWS
28
MAR
27
TAL
19
CLT
8
DOV
15
SON
27
POC
10
MCH
5
DAY
11
POC
10
TAL
14
GLN
15
MCH
36
BRI
17
DAR
16
RCH
34
DOV
9
MAR
7
CLT
12
NWS
17
CAR
21
PHO
19
ATL
23
19th 3051
1990 King Racing 26 Buick DAY
17
RCH
8
CAR
25
ATL
11
DAR
8
BRI
22
NWS
1*
MAR
12
TAL
12
CLT
29
DOV
18
SON
41
POC
4
MCH
14
DAY
22
POC
16
TAL
33
GLN
3
MCH
17
BRI
25
DAR
10
RCH
31
DOV
20
MAR
4
NWS
3
CLT
8
CAR
17
PHO
15
ATL
18
12th 3440
1991 DAY
22
RCH
24
CAR
13
ATL
15
DAR
16
BRI
22
NWS
30*
MAR
4
TAL
11
CLT
28
DOV
33
SON
11
POC
33
MCH
36
DAY
36
POC
8
TAL
32
GLN
25
MCH
37
BRI
10
DAR
14
RCH
18
DOV
32
MAR
2
NWS
7
CLT
8
CAR
30
PHO
14
ATL
29
19th 2980
1992 Ford DAY
41
CAR
8
RCH
33
ATL
20
DAR
6
BRI
11
NWS
10
MAR
8
TAL
16
CLT
20
DOV
30
SON
15
POC
8
MCH
19
DAY
12
POC
8
TAL
10
GLN
10
MCH
12
BRI
9
DAR
4
RCH
18
DOV
22
MAR
3
NWS
7
CLT
28
CAR
7
PHO
12
ATL
40
15th 3491
1993 DAY
17
CAR
22
RCH
32
ATL
8
DAR
12
BRI
9
NWS
17
MAR
7
TAL
30
SON
24
CLT
41
DOV
16
POC
29
MCH
39
DAY
19
NHA
13
POC
5
TAL
9
GLN
20
MCH
14
BRI
7
DAR
2
RCH
5
DOV MAR
6
NWS
21
CLT
15
CAR
35
PHO
28
ATL
40
20th 3183
1994 DAY
32
CAR
6
RCH
8
ATL
31
DAR
36
BRI
13
NWS
23
MAR
24
TAL
17
SON
13
CLT
42
DOV
32
POC
8
MCH
32
DAY
16
NHA
12
POC
35
TAL
17
IND
2
GLN
28
MCH
12
BRI
14
DAR
29
RCH
8
DOV
26
MAR
30
NWS
33
CLT
6
CAR
18
PHO
13
ATL
36
19th 3159
1995 Junior Johnson & Associates 11 Ford DAY
25
CAR
14
RCH
18
ATL
23
DAR
12
BRI
27
NWS
9
MAR
11
TAL
30
SON
29
CLT
35
DOV
21
POC
10
MCH
40
DAY
20
NHA
21
POC
15
TAL
28
IND
24
GLN
16
MCH
36
BRI
28
DAR
31
RCH
16
DOV
17
MAR
22
NWS
22
CLT
27
CAR
27
PHO
17
ATL
20
20th 2988
1996 Brett Bodine Racing DAY
32
CAR
28
RCH
25
ATL
24
DAR
27
BRI
20
NWS
23
MAR
18
TAL
23
SON
20
CLT
24
DOV
24
POC
40
MCH
22
DAY
9
NHA
16
POC
27
TAL
22
IND
22
GLN
14
MCH
28
BRI
14
DAR
28
RCH
25
DOV
27
MAR
DNQ
NWS
23
CLT
28
CAR
16
PHO
26
ATL
21
24th 2814
1997 DAY
18
CAR
17
RCH
23
ATL
18
DAR
35
TEX
19
BRI
10
MAR
27
SON
6
TAL
33
CLT
26
DOV
33
POC
25
MCH
19
CAL
26
DAY
23
NHA
42
POC
29
IND
18
GLN
39
MCH
31
BRI
31
DAR
15
RCH
21
NHA
33
DOV
26
MAR
17
CLT
30
TAL
22
CAR
DNQ
PHO
33
ATL
41
29th 2716
1998 DAY
24
CAR
16
LVS
26
ATL
26
DAR
22
BRI
11
TEX
16
MAR
13
TAL
11
CAL
28
CLT
22
DOV
16
RCH
20
MCH
33
POC
18
SON
32
NHA
28
POC
38
IND
33
GLN
34
MCH
32
BRI
26
NHA
30
DAR
42
RCH
19
DOV
22
MAR
34
CLT
19
TAL
13
DAY
25
PHO
43
CAR
31
ATL
31
25th 2907
1999 DAY
22
CAR
33
LVS
20
ATL
33
DAR
30
TEX
18
BRI
22
MAR
14
TAL
43
CAL
28
RCH
38
CLT
22
DOV
37
MCH
30
POC
26
SON
31
DAY
34
NHA
31
POC
26
IND
DNQ
GLN
40
MCH
DNQ
BRI
12
DAR
26
RCH
31
NHA
29
DOV
29
MAR
42
CLT
27
TAL
31
CAR
43
PHO
42
HOM
40
ATL
30
35th 2351
2000 DAY
DNQ
CAR
35
LVS
DNQ
ATL
16
DAR
27
BRI
22
TEX
23
MAR
36
TAL
DNQ
CAL
41
RCH
38
CLT
30
DOV
28
MCH
36
POC
32
SON
30
DAY
DNQ
NHA
20
POC
30
IND
39
GLN
DNQ
MCH
42
BRI
28
DAR
27
RCH
35
NHA
42
DOV
20
MAR
41
CLT
32
TAL
26
CAR
26
PHO
20
HOM
14
ATL
28
35th 2145
2001 DAY
15
CAR
27
LVS
38
ATL
26
DAR
36
BRI
27
TEX
28
MAR
36
TAL
26
CAL
27
RCH
39
CLT
17
DOV
25
MCH
33
POC
37
SON
13
DAY
9
CHI
19
NHA
13
POC
33
IND
37
GLN
13
MCH
40
BRI
26
DAR
27
RCH
43
DOV
28
KAN
25
CLT
28
MAR
40
TAL
12
PHO
26
CAR
35
HOM
32
ATL
36
NHA
8
30th 2948
2002 DAY
16
CAR
30
LVS
35
ATL
38
DAR
38
BRI
36
TEX
38
MAR
26
TAL
13
CAL
23
RCH
19
CLT
27
DOV
34
POC
24
MCH
34
SON
24
DAY
38
CHI
30
NHA
27
POC
33
IND
42
GLN
32
MCH
38
BRI
32
DAR
39
RCH
20
NHA
36
DOV
DNQ
KAN
DNQ
TAL
29
CLT
26
MAR
38
ATL
34
CAR
36
PHO
DNQ
HOM
DNQ
36th 2276
2003 DAY
DNQ
CAR LVS ATL
41
BRI
24
TEX
31
TAL
DNQ
MAR CAL RCH
31
CLT
DNQ
DOV
42
POC MCH
INQ
SON DAY CHI NHA IND
DNQ
GLN MCH BRI DAR RCH NHA DOV TAL KAN CLT MAR ATL PHO CAR HOM 52nd 308
Team CLR 57 Ford DAR
31
Morgan-McClure Motorsports 4 Pontiac POC
DNQ
- Qualified but replaced by Geoff Bodine
Daytona 500
Year Team Manufacturer Start Finish
1988 Bud Moore Engineering Ford 41 35
1989 18 29
1990 King Racing Buick 33 17
1991 41 22
1992 Ford 18 41
1993 20 17
1994 10 32
1995 Junior Johnson & Associates Ford 39 25
1996 Brett Bodine Racing Ford 41 32
1997 37 18
1998 42 24
1999 40 22
2000 DNQ
2001 43 15
2002 27 16
2003 DNQ

Busch Series

NASCAR Busch Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 NBGNC Pts
1985 Hendrick Motorsports 15 Pontiac DAY CAR HCY BRI
12
23rd 1438
5 MAR
1
DAR SBO
4
LGY DOV CLT
4
SBO
3
HCY
2
ROU IRP
25*
SBO LGY HCY
9
MLW BRI
1*
DAR
8
RCH NWS ROU CLT
9
HCY CAR
1*
MAR
27
1986 Thomas Brothers Racing 00 Olds DAY
23
CAR
24
HCY
8
MAR
20
BRI
19
DAR
3
SBO
8
LGY
10
JFC
6
DOV
3
CLT
2
SBO
5
HCY
3
ROU
6
IRP
26
SBO
22
RAL
6
OXF
7
SBO
2
HCY
2*
LGY
2
ROU
3
BRI
1*
DAR
3
RCH
19
DOV
3
MAR
4
ROU
3*
CLT
7
CAR
5
MAR
1
2nd 4507
1987 DAY
4
HCY
5
MAR
19
DAR
3
BRI
10
LGY
6
SBO
2
CLT
30
DOV
23
IRP
4
ROU
24
JFC
8
OXF
11
SBO
4
HCY
6
RAL
10
LGY
8
ROU
24
BRI
13
JFC
7
DAR
16
RCH
29
DOV
6
MAR
5*
CLT
10
CAR
25
MAR
3
3rd 3560
1992 H&H Motorsports 26 Chevy DAY CAR RCH ATL MAR DAR BRI HCY LAN DUB NZH CLT DOV ROU MYB GLN
28
VOL NHA TAL IRP ROU MCH NHA BRI DAR RCH DOV CLT MAR CAR HCY 118th 79
1993 DAY CAR RCH DAR BRI HCY ROU MAR NZH CLT DOV MYB GLN
28
MLW TAL IRP MCH NHA BRI DAR RCH DOV ROU CLT MAR CAR HCY ATL 98th 79
1999 Keystone Motorsports 54 Chevy DAY CAR LVS ATL DAR TEX
33
NSV BRI TAL CAL
DNQ
NHA RCH NZH CLT
6
DOV SBO GLN MLW MYB PPR GTY IRP MCH
18
BRI DAR RCH
DNQ
DOV CLT
DNQ
CAR
15
MEM PHO HOM 69th 387
2000 Labonte Motorsports 44 Chevy DAY CAR LVS ATL DAR BRI TEX NSV TAL CAL RCH NHA CLT DOV SBO MYB GLN MLW NZH PPR GTY IRP MCH
DNQ
BRI DAR RCH DOV CLT CAR MEM PHO HOM NA -

Craftsman Truck Series

NASCAR Craftsman Truck Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 NCTC Pts
1997 Team Racing 11 Chevy WDW TUS HOM PHO POR EVG I70 NHA TEX BRI NZH MLW LVL CNS HPT IRP FLM NSV GLN RCH MAR SON MMR CAL PHO LVS
DNQ
NA -
1998 WDW
32
HOM PHO POR EVG I70 GLN TEX BRI MLW NZH CAL PPR IRP NHA FLM NSV HPT LVL RCH
32
MEM GTY 66th 192
71 MAR
35
SON MMR PHO LVS

ARCA Permatex SuperCar Series

(key) (Bold – Pole position awarded by qualifying time. Italics – Pole position earned by points standings or practice time. * – Most laps led.)

ARCA Permatex SuperCar Series results
Year Team No. Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 APSC Pts Ref
1985 Hendrick Motorsports 5 Pontiac ATL DAY ATL TAL ATL SSP IRP
25*
CSP FRS IRP OEF ISF DSF TOL 75th - [89]
1986 15 ATL
2
DAY ATL TAL SIR SSP FRS KIL CSP TAL BLN ISF DSF TOL MCS ATL 85th - [90]

References

  1. ^ Legare, Andrew. "Racing and family have always gone together for Chemung native Brett Bodine". Star-Gazette. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  2. ^ a b "50 Greatest Modified Drivers - Brett Bodine". Stafford Motor Speedway. 2020-01-29. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  3. ^ "NASCAR Busch Grand National Series standings for 1986 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  4. ^ a b c d "Driver Brett Bodine Career Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  5. ^ "Racer Profile: Brett Bodine". www.insiderracingnews.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  6. ^ "1979 NASCAR Modified National Championship Central - The Third Turn". www.thethirdturn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  7. ^ "1980 NASCAR Modified National Championship Central - The Third Turn". www.thethirdturn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  8. ^ "1983 NASCAR Modified National Championship Central - The Third Turn". www.thethirdturn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  9. ^ "1984 Oxford NASCAR Twin 100s (MOD) - The Third Turn". www.thethirdturn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  10. ^ "1984 Winston Racing Series Central/Northeast Region - The Third Turn". www.thethirdturn.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  11. ^ a b c d "Brett Bodine and the Season that made his career".
  12. ^ "09/15/1985 race: Cam 2 Race of Champions (Mod) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  13. ^ "03/30/1985 race: Budweiser 200 (NXS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  14. ^ "04/06/1985 race: Miller 200 (NXS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  15. ^ "1985 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series Tri-City Pontiac 200 - Bristol".
  16. ^ "NASCAR Busch Grand National Series standings for 1985 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  17. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1986 NASCAR Busch Grand National Series Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  18. ^ "Brett Bodine Part 1".
  19. ^ "NASCAR Busch Grand National Series standings for 1986 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  20. ^ "NASCAR Xfinity Series Page - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  21. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1986 NASCAR Winston Modified Tour Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  22. ^ "05/25/1986 race: Coca-Cola 600 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  23. ^ "NASCAR Busch Grand National Series standings for 1987 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  24. ^ Meixell, Ted. "LABONTE SETS MARK FOR POCONO POLE". The Morning Call. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  25. ^ "04/05/1987 race: First Union 400 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  26. ^ "04/12/1987 race: Valleydale Meats 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  27. ^ "05/17/1987 race: Winston Open (AS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  28. ^ "05/24/1987 race: Coca-Cola 600 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  29. ^ "07/04/1987 race: Pepsi Firecracker 400 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  30. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1987 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  31. ^ "05/29/1988 race: Coca-Cola 600 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  32. ^ "10/09/1988 race: Oakwood Homes 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  33. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1988 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  34. ^ "season-stats". Racing-Reference. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  35. ^ "Cup Series".
  36. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1989 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  37. ^ "05/21/1989 race: Winston Open (AS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  38. ^ "FILE PHOTO Brett Bodine ...joining Kenny Bernstein Bodine leaving Moore team". GoUpstate. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  39. ^ "Brett Bodine Part 1".
  40. ^ "Brett Bodine Wins At North Wilkesboro". Orlando Sentinel. Orlando, FL. April 23, 1990. Retrieved 2014-04-24.
  41. ^ Hardin, Ed. "BRETT BODINE GAINS A DISPUTED FIRST WIN". Greensboro News and Record. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  42. ^ "10/07/1990 race: Mello Yello 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  43. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1990 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  44. ^ "Larry McReynolds Crew Chief Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  45. ^ "Clyde Booth Crew Chief Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  46. ^ "04/21/1991 race: First Union 400 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  47. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1991 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  48. ^ "09/22/1991 race: Goody's 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  49. ^ "NASCAR Winston Cup standings for 1991 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  50. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1992 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  51. ^ "04/26/1992 race: Hanes 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  52. ^ "09/28/1992 race: Goody's 500 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  53. ^ "05/16/1992 race: Winston Open (AS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  54. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1993 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  55. ^ "05/22/1993 race: The Winston (AS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  56. ^ "NASCAR Winston Cup standings for 1993 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  57. ^ "02/13/1994 race: Busch Clash (EX) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  58. ^ "08/06/1994 race: Brickyard 400 (Cup) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  59. ^ "NASCAR Winston Cup standings for 1994 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  60. ^ Pearce, Al. "NASCAR CHEATERS WON'T PROSPER". dailypress.com. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  61. ^ "Mike Beam Crew Chief Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  62. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1995 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  63. ^ "NASCAR Cup Series - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  64. ^ a b c Assael, Shaun. (1998). Wide open : days and nights on the nascar tour. [Place of publication not identified]: Diane Pub Co. ISBN 0-7567-7750-X. OCLC 948027116.
  65. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1996 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  66. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1997 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  67. ^ "News (Late Add) 97-10-03". us.motorsport.com. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  68. ^ "NASCAR Winston Cup standings for 1997 - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  69. ^ "HotRod Magazine Brett Bodine".
  70. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1998 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  71. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 1999 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  72. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 2000 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  73. ^ Autoweek (2001-03-19). "Getting Smarter: More NASCAR drivers are beginning to wear the HANS device". Autoweek. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  74. ^ "Darrell Waltrip Owner Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  75. ^ "Ricky Rudd Owner Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  76. ^ "Bill Elliott Owner Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  77. ^ "Geoffrey Bodine Owner Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  78. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 2001 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  79. ^ "News and Notes".
  80. ^ a b "Brett Bodine Owner Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  81. ^ "Mike Hillman Crew Chief Statistics - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  82. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 2002 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  83. ^ "Driver Brett Bodine 2003 NASCAR Winston Cup Results - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  84. ^ "05/17/2003 race: Winston Open (AS) - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  85. ^ "Driver Gets Restraining Order on Wife". Huron Daily Tribune. 2003-03-07. Retrieved 2020-09-30.
  86. ^ "Brett Bodine: Double whammy". The Blade. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  87. ^ "NASCAR Cup Series - Racing-Reference.info". www.racing-reference.info. Retrieved 2020-12-01.
  88. ^ Raker, Harold. "Motorsports: Bodine continues to set the pace for Sprint Cup". The Daily Item. Retrieved 2020-11-30.
  89. ^ "Brett Bodine – 1985 ARCA Talladega SuperCar Series Results". Racing-Reference. Retrieved July 23, 2015.
  90. ^ "Brett Bodine – 1986 ARCA Permatex SuperCar Series Results". Racing-Reference. Retrieved July 23, 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 22 April 2021, at 06:36
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.