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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bob Goody in 2015
Bob Goody in 2015

Robert Goody (born 16 April 1951) is a British film and television actor, a writer and librettist and a former member of the Royal Shakespeare Company.

Theatre work

Bob Goody trained at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art. He was a founder member of the acclaimed theatre company Shared Experience performing the Arabian Nights trilogy. He played various characters with the company, including: the Ghost, the Player King and the Gravedigger in Hamlet. In 1987, he toured as Dr. Pinch in The Comedy of Errors and as the Ghost and the Gravedigger in Hamlet with the Royal Shakespeare Company.[1][2] In 1991 he played the Chief Weasel in Alan Bennett's adaptation of The Wind in the Willows for the National Theatre at The Old Vic in London.[3]

In January and February 2016, he played Lucky opposite Lorcan Cranitch and Jeff Rawle as Vladimir and Estragon and Richard Cordery as Pozzo in Samuel Beckett's Waiting for Godot at the Crucible Theatre in Sheffield. The production was described by The Telegraph as having a "stark brutality", and added that "Bob Goody's Lucky is also tremendous, with his spidery, Dickensian limbs, yellowing hair and death-mask face, like some ghastly apparition resembling all their future selves."[4][5]

Television and film roles

Goody made his first television appearance in The Devil's Crown (1978) and went on to appear in Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Watson (1979), Robin's Nest (1980), Smith and Goody (as writer and actor) (1980), Luna (1983), Bleak House (1985), The Kenny Everett Television Show (1985), Porterhouse Blue (1987), Selling Hitler (1991), Blue Heaven (1992), The Blackheath Poisonings (1992), Lovejoy (1993), Screen Two (1993), Paul Merton's Life of Comedy (1995), McCallum (1997), Danny the caretaker in seven episodes of Crime Traveller (1997), Lock, Stock... (2000), Dark Realm (2001), Doctors (2003), four episodes of The Bill (1989–2004), Hotel Babylon (2008), Crusoe (2008), EastEnders (2011), Gustave in X Company (2015) and Squire in Cider with Rosie (2015).[6]

His film roles include appearances in Flash Gordon (1980), Those Glory Glory Days (1983), The Stone Age (1989), The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover (1989), Fire, Ice and Dynamite (1990), Buskers Odyssey (1994), The Grotesque (1995), Treasure Island (1995), The Borrowers (1997), Lighthouse (1999), In the Doghouse (2002), The Thief Lord (2006), That Summer Day (2006), The Great Ghost Rescue (2011), Late September (2012), Mr. Turner (2014), Peterloo (2018) and 23 Walks (2020).[6]

As a writer

While Goody and Mel Smith were working on a two-man show at the Traverse Theatre, they teamed up with composer Peter Brewis and together created three black comedy musicals, 'Ave You 'Eard the One About Joey Baker?, Irony in Dorking which won a Fringe First Award and The Gambler whose 1986 revival at the Hampstead Theatre was nominated for an Olivier Award[7] and was also recorded by the specialist musical theatre label First Night Records.[8][9] He wrote the libretto for The Fashion, an opera for Deutsche Oper am Rhein, with music by Giorgio Battistelli. This was performed in the company's 2008 season. He co-wrote the BBC sitcom Wilderness Road as well as two volumes of performance poetry: Mixing With The Sharks and Life and Death And A Few Other Bits and Pieces.

Goody played Bill Maddox in the 1996 video game Privateer 2: The Darkening.

Bob Goody is 6' 4" tall, is married, has three daughters and lives in Bloomsbury in Central London.[3]

References

  1. ^ "The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark". The Royal Shakespeare Company. Archived from the original on 26 January 2012. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  2. ^ "The Comedy of Errors". The Royal Shakespeare Company. Macmillan Publishers Limited. Archived from the original on 19 July 2010. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  3. ^ a b "Bob Goody". Doolee.com. 2003. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  4. ^ Allfree, Claire (9 February 2016). "Waiting for Godot, Sheffield Crucible, review: 'stark brutality'". The Telegraph. Telegraph Media Group Limited. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  5. ^ "Waiting for Godot". Sheffield Theatres website. Archived from the original on 23 October 2017. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  6. ^ a b Bob Goody on the Internet Movie Database
  7. ^ "Oliver Winners 1986". The Olivier Awards for 1986 website. Archived from the original on 1 April 2012. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  8. ^ "Oliviers: Olivier Winners 1986". The Society of London Theatre. 24 April 2008. Archived from the original on 11 January 2012. Retrieved 3 May 2019.
  9. ^ "Gambler, The – Original London Cast". First Night Records. Retrieved 3 May 2019.

External links

This page was last edited on 4 October 2020, at 19:39
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