To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Roman Catholic Diocese of Tragurium

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

.mw-parser-output .legend{page-break-inside:avoid;break-inside:avoid-column}.mw-parser-output .legend-color{display:inline-block;min-width:1.25em;height:1.25em;line-height:1.25;margin:1px 0;text-align:center;border:1px solid black;background-color:transparent;color:black}.mw-parser-output .legend-text{}  Diocese of Trogir in the 15th century
  Diocese of Trogir in the 15th century

Tragurium, Ancient Latin name of a city in Dalmatia (coastal Croatia), now called Trogir, was a bishopric until 1829 and a Latin titular bishopric until 1933.[1][2]

History

In 1050 Tragurium became the seat of a diocese also known as Traù (in curiate Italian) or Trogir in Croatian language.

On 1 May 1298 it lost territory to establish the Diocese of Šibenik.

On 30 June 1828, the residential see was abolished by papal bull Locum Beati Petri, a Croation dioceses reshuffle, which divided its territory over the then Roman Catholic Diocese of Split–Makarska and its own above daughter Šibenik.

Residential suffragan bishops

  • Petrus (970-?)
  • Saint John of Trogir, actually Giovanny, from Osor (1062 - death 14.11.1111)
  • Anonim (1112 -?)
  • sede vacante (1123-1151?)
  • Dessa Maccarelli, from Tragurium (1151-1180, elected only)
  • Michael, from Tragurium (1180-1206), previously Coadjutor Bishop of Traù (? – 1180?)
  • Treguanus alias Treguano, from Florence (1206 - death 1254)
  • Columbanus alias fra Columbano, from Rab, Friars Minor (O.F.M.) (1255-1277)
  • Joannes II (1277-?)
  • Gregorius Machinatura, from Tragurium (1282 - death 1297)
  • Liberio, from Ancona (Italy, 1297 - death 1319)
  • Lampridio Vitturi, from Tragurium (1320 - death 1348)
  • fra Bartolomeo, from Vallismontana (1349 - death 1361?), previously Bishop of Kotor (Montenegro) (1348.07.14 – 1349.01.30)
  • Niccolò de' Casotti (Nikola Kažotić), from Tragurium (1361 - death 1370)
  • Valentinus (1370-?)
  • Crisogono (Krševan) de Dominis (14 July 1372 - 1403), from and previously Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Arba (Rab) (1363.06.07 – 1372.07.14); later Metropolitan Archbishop of Kalocsa (Hungary, plausibly not possessed as he died the same year)
  • Simone (Šimun) de Dominis, from Rab (1403 - death 1420?)
  • Marino de Cernotis (Carnota), from Rab (1423 - 1424), previously Bishop of Arba (1414.02.11 – 1423.05.07); later bishop of Trieste (Italy, 1424.12.11 – death 1441)
  • fra Tommaso Tomasini from Tuscia, Dominicans (O.P.) (1424 - 1435), previously Bishop of Cittanova (d'Istria) (Croatia, 1409 – 1420.03.04), Bishop of Pula (Croatia) (1420.03.04 – 1423.09.24), Bishop of Roman Catholic Diocese of Urbino (Italy) (1423.09.24 – 1424.12.11); later bishop of Recanati (Italy, 1435.10.24 – 1440.10.15), then Bishop of Feltre (Italy) (1440.10.15 – 1446.03.24)
  • Ludovico (Trevisan) Scarampi Mezzarota, from Padua (Italy, 1435 - 1437), later Metropolitan Archbishop of Firenze (Florence) (Italy) (1437.08.06 – 1439.12.18), Patriarch of Aquileia (Italy) (1439.12.18 – 1465.03.22), created Cardinal-Priest of San Lorenzo in Damaso (1440.07.01 – 1465.01.07), Chamberlain of the Holy Roman Church of Reverend Apostolic Camera (1440 – death 1465.03.22)
  • Giovanni Vitelleschi, Apostolic administrator or Bishop, according to the source, 1437 - 1440); previously Bishop of Macerata (Italy) (1431.04.16 – 1435.10.12), Titular Patriarch of Alexandria (1435.02.21 – death 1440.04.02), Metropolitan Archbishop of Firenze (Florence) (Italy) (1435.10.12 – 1437.08.09); also Cardinal-Priest of San Lorenzo in Lucina (1437.08.09 – 1440.04.02), Archpriest of the Roman Papal Basilica of St. Mary Major (1439 – 1440.04.02)
  • Angelo Cavazza from Venice (1440 - death 1452), previously Bishop of Arba (1428.02.23 – 1433.01.07), Bishop of Poreč–Novigrad (Croatia) (1433.01.07 – 1440.04.11)
  • Giacomo Trugloni, from Ancona (Italy, 1452 - death 1483)
  • Leonello Chiericato, from Vicenza (Italy, 1484 - 1488), previously Bishop of Arba (1472.01.08 – 1484.01.19); later bishop of Concordia (1488.10.22 – death 1506.08.19)
  • Francesco Marcelli, from Venice (1488 - death 1524)
  • Toma Niger (Tommaso de Nigris)[3] from Split (1524-1525), alias Tommaso de Nigris, previously Bishop of Skradin (1520.01.11 – 1524.09.02) ***
  • Cristoforo de Baptistis (Niger) alias Cristoforo de Nigris, from Split (Croatia, 1525.06.07 - death 1559.11.25)
  • Federico Cornaro[4] from Venice (1560-1561), later Bishop of Bergamo (Italy) (1561.01.15 – 1577.07.19), Bishop of Padua (Italy) (1577.07.19 – 1590.10.04), created Cardinal-Priest of San Stefano al Monte Celio (1586.01.15 – 1590.10.04)
  • Tommaso Sperandio Corbelli, from Fano (Italy, 1567 - 1574)[5]
  • Antonio Guidi, from Mantua (Italy, 1574 - 1604)
  • Martius Andreucci, from Udine (Italy, 1604 - 1622)[6]
  • Pace Giordano (Pax Jordanus) (1623-1649)[7] from Vicenza (1623-1649)
    • sede vacante (1649-1654)
  • Francesco Coccalini, from Venice (1654 - 1661)
  • Giovanni Paolo Garzoni, from Venice (1663 - 1675)
  • Giovanni de Andreis, from Trogir (1676 - 1683)
  • Joannes Cuppari (Ivan Cupareo), from Split (1684 - 1694)[8]
  • Joseph Simeon Cavagnini, from Split (1695 - 1698)
  • Stefano Cupilli, from Venice (1699 - 1708 transferred to the see of Split)
  • Pietro Paolo Calorio (Calore), from Venice (1708 - 1713 transferred to the see of Krk, Criatia)
  • fra Michael Angelus Farfulfi (Michelangelo Farolfi), from Candia (Heraklion) (Crte, Greece, 1713 - 1715)
  • Ivan Vidović (Jean Vidovich) from Šibenik (1716 - 1721)
  • Ante Kadčić (Antoine Kacich) from Makarska (1722 – 1730 transferred to the see of Split)
  • fra Giuseppe Caccia, from Venice (1731 - 1737)
  • Gerolamo Fonda[9] from Piran (1738 - 1754)
  • Didak Manola (Diego Manola), from Split (1755 - 1765)
  • Ivan Antun Miočević (Johann Anton Miocevich), from Šibenik (Croatia, 1766 - 1786)
  • Lelio Cippico, from Trogir (accepted 1783 the transfer from the see of Šibenik when Miočević was to be transferred to the see of Split – 1784 transferred to the see of Split)[10]
  • Antonio Belglava (Antun Belglava), from Zadar (Croatia, 1787 - 1789)
  • Giovanni Pietro Galzigna, from Rab (1790 - 1795 transferred to the see of Rab)
  • Giovanni Antonio Pinelli, from Trogir (1795 - 1821)
    • sede vacante (1821-1828)

Titular see

Since 1933 the bishopric was nominally restored and is on the Catholic Church's list of titular sees.[11]

It has had the following incumbents, all of the lowest (episcopal) rank :

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Diocese of Trogir (Traù)" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Titular Episcopal See of Trogir" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Croats at European universities in Middle Ages, Latinists, Encyclopaedists
  4. ^ Cardinal Federico Cornaro
  5. ^ "Bishop Tommaso Sperandio Corbelli" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016[self-published source]
  6. ^ "Bishop Martius Andreucci" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016[self-published source]
  7. ^ Lovorka Čoralić, Iva Kurelac (February 2004). "A contribution to our knowledge about the life of Pace Giordano, the Bishop of Trogir (1623-1649)". Croatica Christiana Periodica. Zagreb, Croatia: The Catholic Faculty of Theology. 52. Retrieved 2012-02-27. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link) CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  8. ^ "Bishop Joannes Cuppari" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved August 8, 2016[self-published source]
  9. ^ Acta Histriae, 9, 2001, 2 (XII.)
  10. ^ Hrvatski biografski leksikon vol. 2, Zagreb 1989, p. 679
  11. ^ Annuario Pontificio 2013 (Libreria Editrice Vaticana, 2013, ISBN 978-88-209-9070-1), p. 995
  12. ^ bishop melczek

External links

This page was last edited on 13 April 2021, at 21:22
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.