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Benjamin Faneuil Dunkin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Benjamin Faneuil Dunkin
Benjamin Faneuil Dunkin.png
Chief Justice of South Carolina
In office
November 1, 1865[1] – 1868
Preceded byJohn Belton O'Neall
Succeeded byFranklin J. Moses Sr.
Personal details
BornDecember 2, 1792
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
DiedDecember 5, 1874(1874-12-05) (aged 82)
Charleston, South Carolina
Spouse(s)Washington Sala Prentiss
Alma materHarvard University
Benjamin Faneuil Duncan built his house with fine Regency interiors in about 1823 at 89 Warren Street, Charleston, South Carolina and lived there until 1870.
Benjamin Faneuil Duncan built his house with fine Regency interiors in about 1823 at 89 Warren Street, Charleston, South Carolina and lived there until 1870.

Benjamin Faneuil Dunkin was a chief justice on the South Carolina Supreme Court. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on December 2, 1792; graduated from Harvard University when he was eighteen; and moved to Charleston, South Carolina in 1811. He was elected to the South Carolina House of Representatives and served as its Speaker in 1828 and 1829. Between 1865 and 1868, he was Chief Justice of the South Carolina Supreme Court.[2] He died on December 5, 1874, at his home in Charleston, South Carolina.[3] He is buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.[4]

References

  1. ^ "Legislature South Carolina". The Daily Phoenix. Columbia, South Carolina. November 3, 1865. p. 2. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  2. ^ Brooks, Ulysses Robert (1908). South Carolina Bench and Bar. The State Co. pp. 32. South Carolina Bench and Bar.
  3. ^ "Judge Benjamin Faneuil Duncan". The New York Times. New York, New York. December 13, 1874. p. 2. Retrieved September 25, 2014.
  4. ^ "Benjamin Faneuil Dunkin (1792-1874)". Find a Grave. Retrieved September 25, 2014.


This page was last edited on 21 January 2020, at 17:01
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