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Belmont County, Ohio

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Belmont County, Ohio
St Clairsville Ohio Courthouse.jpg
Seal of Belmont County, Ohio

Seal
Motto: Meliorem lapsa locavit
(Latin, "He has planted one better than the one fallen")[1]
Map of Ohio highlighting Belmont County

Location within the U.S. state of Ohio
Map of the United States highlighting Ohio

Ohio's location within the U.S.
Founded7 September 1801 (created)
1 March 1815 (organized)
Named for"beautiful mountain" in French
SeatSt. Clairsville
Largest cityMartins Ferry
Area
 • Total541.27 sq mi (1,402 km2)
 • Land532.13 sq mi (1,378 km2)
 • Water9.14 sq mi (24 km2), 1.7%
Population
 • (2010)70,400
 • Density132/sq mi (51/km2)
Congressional district6th
Time zoneEastern: UTC−5/−4
Websitewww.belmontcountyohio.org

Belmont County is a county in the U.S. state of Ohio. As of the 2010 United States Census, the population was 70,400.[2] Its county seat is St. Clairsville.[3] The county was created in 1801 and organized in 1815.[4] It takes its name from the French for "beautiful mountain".[5]

Belmont County is part of the Wheeling, WV-OH Metropolitan Statistical Area. It is the only Belmont County nationwide.

History

Dille, Ohio, also known as Dilles Bottom, was located across the Ohio River from Moundsville, West Virginia. It was founded by the sons of David Dille (b. 1718) around 1790 and was initially a fort called Fort Dille.

Belmont County was authorized in 1801 by the Northwest Territorial legislature, with area partitioned from Jefferson and Washington counties.[6] Its area was reduced in 1810 when area was ceded for the formation of Guernsey and again in 1813 for the formation of Monroe counties. It has retained its boundaries unchanged since 1813. In 1815 its government was organized, with Saint Clairsville named as the county seat.

Belmont is the French term for "beautiful mountain". Settlers migrating westward followed Zane's Trace through the county. Later, the National Road was built through the county.

Quakers were among the county's first settlers. Many of these people would become outspoken critics of slavery, including famous abolitionist Benjamin Lundy.

Geography

Belmont County lies on the east side of Ohio. Its east border abuts the west border of West Virginia (across the Ohio River). The Ohio flows southward along the county's east line. Captina Creek flows eastward through the lower part of the county, discharging into the Ohio at Powhatan Point, and McMahon Creek also flows eastward through the center of the county, discharging into the Ohio at Bellaire. The county terrain consists of low rolling hills, etched with drainages. All available area is devoted to agriculture.[7] The terrain slopes to the east,[8] with its highest point, Galloway Knob (1,396' or 426m ASL) at 1.2 mile (2 km) southeast of Lamira.[9] The county has a total area of 541.27 sqmi (1492 km²), of which 532.13 sqmi (1378 km²) is land and 9.14 sqmi (23.69 km²) (1.7%) is water.[10]

Adjacent counties

Major highways

Protected areas

Lakes

  • Barnesville Lake
  • Barnesville Reservoir #3
  • Belmont Lake
  • Piedmont Lake (part)[7]

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
181011,097
182020,32983.2%
183028,62740.8%
184030,9017.9%
185034,60012.0%
186036,3985.2%
187039,7149.1%
188049,63825.0%
189057,41315.7%
190060,8756.0%
191076,85626.3%
192093,19321.3%
193094,7191.6%
194095,6140.9%
195087,740−8.2%
196083,864−4.4%
197080,917−3.5%
198082,5692.0%
199071,074−13.9%
200070,226−1.2%
201070,4000.2%
Est. 201867,505[11]−4.1%
US Decennial Census[12]
1790-1960[13] 1900-1990[14]
1990-2000[15] 2010-2017[2]

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 70,400 people, 28,679 households, and 18,761 families in the county.[16] The population density was 132.3/sqmi (51.1/km²). There were 32,452 housing units at an average density of 61.0/sqmi (23.55/km²).[17] The racial makeup of the county was 94.0% white, 4.0% black or African American, 0.4% Asian, 0.1% American Indian, 0.2% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 0.6% of the population.[16] In terms of ancestry, 26.0% were German, 17.9% were Irish, 12.4% were English, 10.1% were Italian, 9.0% were Polish, and 6.2% were American.[18]

Of the 28,679 households, 27.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.2% were married couples living together, 11.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 34.6% were non-families, and 29.9% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.32 and the average family size was 2.85. The median age was 43.4 years.[16]

The median income for a household in the county was $38,320 and the median income for a family was $47,214. Males had a median income of $42,022 versus $26,926 for females. The per capita income for the county was $20,266. About 12.1% of families and 15.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.4% of those under age 18 and 9.1% of those age 65 or over.[19]

2000 census

As of the 2000 United States Census,[20] there were 70,226 people, 28,309 households, and 19,250 families in the county. The population density was 132.0/sqmi (50.96/km²). There were 31,236 housing units at an average density of 58.7/sqmi (22.66/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 94.98% White, 3.64% Black or African American, 0.14% Native American, 0.30% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.16% from other races, and 0.77% from two or more races. 0.39% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 20.2% were of German, 12.5% Irish, 12.0% American, 10.3% English, 10.2% Italian and 9.0% Polish ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 28,309 households out of which 28.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.10% were married couples living together, 11.20% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.00% were non-families. 28.70% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.90.

The county population contained 21.80% under the age of 18, 7.70% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 24.90% from 45 to 64, and 18.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 96.40 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.60 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $29,714, and the median income for a family was $37,538. Males had a median income of $31,211 versus $19,890 for females. The per capita income for the county was $16,221. About 11.70% of families and 14.60% of the population were below the poverty line, including 20.40% of those under age 18 and 9.80% of those age 65 or over.

Politics

In past decades the voters of Belmont County have usually voted Democratic (18 of the past 22 national elections), but in 2012 and 2016 the county selected the Republican Party candidate.

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[21]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 67.4% 21,108 28.0% 8,785 4.6% 1,438
2012 52.9% 16,758 44.7% 14,156 2.4% 774
2008 47.4% 15,422 50.1% 16,302 2.5% 812
2004 46.8% 15,589 52.8% 17,576 0.5% 157
2000 41.9% 12,625 53.0% 15,980 5.1% 1,536
1996 26.8% 8,213 57.8% 17,705 15.4% 4,721
1992 25.8% 8,614 55.4% 18,527 18.8% 6,280
1988 38.2% 12,214 61.0% 19,515 0.8% 244
1984 43.5% 15,170 55.8% 19,458 0.7% 228
1980 42.5% 13,601 52.0% 16,653 5.5% 1,770
1976 38.5% 13,550 60.1% 21,162 1.4% 507
1972 53.6% 17,628 45.0% 14,800 1.4% 450
1968 31.9% 11,512 61.2% 22,056 6.9% 2,478
1964 25.6% 9,693 74.4% 28,180
1960 43.3% 18,146 56.7% 23,805
1956 50.3% 19,230 49.7% 18,991
1952 41.7% 17,693 58.3% 24,759
1948 35.8% 13,283 62.5% 23,217 1.7% 643
1944 39.1% 15,485 60.9% 24,093
1940 38.2% 17,705 61.8% 28,618
1936 31.9% 14,511 67.2% 30,545 0.9% 425
1932 40.8% 15,029 55.0% 20,291 4.2% 1,565
1928 60.8% 20,969 37.2% 12,807 2.0% 692
1924 54.5% 16,378 26.9% 8,074 18.6% 5,583
1920 50.6% 14,761 45.7% 13,347 3.7% 1,093
1916 44.2% 7,526 46.4% 7,911 9.4% 1,609
1912 34.0% 5,267 34.9% 5,412 31.1% 4,812
1908 48.0% 8,193 45.4% 7,750 6.6% 1,120
1904 56.8% 8,170 33.4% 4,801 9.9% 1,425
1900 55.4% 8,217 42.1% 6,251 2.5% 365
1896 53.7% 7,699 44.7% 6,413 1.6% 236
1892 48.3% 6,329 46.7% 6,123 5.0% 657
1888 51.6% 6,615 45.0% 5,778 3.4% 440
1884 50.8% 6,186 47.3% 5,763 1.9% 231
1880 50.1% 5,539 48.6% 5,379 1.3% 143
1876 49.6% 4,976 50.0% 5,024 0.4% 41
1872 53.8% 4,267 46.0% 3,647 0.3% 22

Government

Most of the county's government offices are located in the Belmont County Courthouse.[22] Belmont County has a three-member board of county commissioners who administer and oversee the various county departments, similar to all but two of the 88 Ohio counties. The elected commissioners serve staggered four-year terms. As of 2019, Belmont County's elected commissioners are: Jerry Echemann (R), J.P. Dutton (R), and Josh Meyer (R).[23]

Belmont County's county flag was designed in 1988 by local state official Michael Massa. Local citizens voted in a nationally covered election to choose it from a group of three designs by Massa. The seal (minus a Latin phrase) is featured on the county's flag.[24]

Corrections

Belmont County is served by several detention centers located around St. Clairsville. The Belmont Correctional Institution is located on 158 acres (0.64 km2) between St. Clairsville and Bannock on State Route 331. The facility houses 2,698 inmates as of 2009.[25] The Belmont County Jail in St. Clairsville is located near Belmont College and Ohio University Eastern Campus. The facility contains 144 beds and also houses the county sheriff's offices.[26] The county is also served by Sargus Juvenile Detention Center, a 17-bed facility that also serves surrounding counties.[27] Sargus Center is located next to the county jail.

Education

K-12

Belmont County is served by these local schools:

Higher education

Communities

Map of Belmont County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Belmont County, Ohio With Municipal and Township Labels

Cities

Villages

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Townships

Notable residents

See also

References

  1. ^ "Belmont County Flag". Capitol Square Review and Advisory Board. Retrieved January 26, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  3. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  4. ^ "Ohio: Individual County Chronologies". Ohio Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2007. Retrieved February 12, 2015.
  5. ^ "Belmont County data". Ohio State University Extension Data Center. Retrieved April 28, 2007.[dead link]
  6. ^ McKelvey, A. T.. Centennial history of Belmont County, Ohio, and representative citizens. pp. 46-47. Chicago, Biographical Pub. Co. (1903)
  7. ^ a b c Belmont County OH - Google Maps (accessed 12 June 2019)
  8. ^ "Find an Altitude/Belmont County OH" - Google Maps (accessed 12 June 2019)
  9. ^ Galloway Knob OH (PeakBagger.com, accessed 12 June 2019)
  10. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Archived from the original on May 4, 2014. Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  11. ^ "American FactFinder". Retrieved June 12, 2019.
  12. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  13. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  14. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  15. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved February 7, 2015.
  16. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  17. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  18. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  19. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved December 27, 2015.
  20. ^ "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on September 11, 2013. Retrieved January 31, 2008.
  21. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  22. ^ "Ohio Secretary of State 2006 Unofficial Election  Statistics". Archived from the original on April 9, 2007. Retrieved April 5, 2007.
  23. ^ "Belmont County Board of County Commissioners". Belmont County Ohio Homepage. Retrieved May 7, 2019.
  24. ^ Ohio County Flags: Belmont County, The Ohio Channel, 2007. Accessed September 11, 2007.
  25. ^ "Belmont Correctional Institution". state.oh.us. Archived from the original on September 1, 2009. Retrieved August 20, 2009.
  26. ^ "Belmont County Sheriff's Office".
  27. ^ "Belmont County Juvenile Court". belmontcountyjuvenilecourt.com. Archived from the original on July 7, 2011. Retrieved August 20, 2009.
  28. ^ "Kansas Governor Walter Roscoe Stubbs". National Governors Association. Archived from the original on June 14, 2012. Retrieved September 29, 2012.
  29. ^ "Former Sheriff Dies" (accessed 12 June 2019)
  30. ^ "Katherine Crumbley" (accessed 12 June 2019)

Further reading

  • Thomas William Lewis, History of Southeastern Ohio and the Muskingum Valley, 1788-1928. In Three Volumes. Chicago: S.J. Clarke Publishing Co., 1928.

External links

This page was last edited on 8 July 2019, at 23:36
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