To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Azalea Open Invitational

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Azalea Open Invitational
Tournament information
LocationWilmington, North Carolina
Established1945 (Mobile, Alabama)
Course(s)Cape Fear Country Club
Par71
Length6,575 yards (6,012 m)[1]
Tour(s)PGA Tour
(1945, 1949–1970)
FormatStroke play - 72 holes
Prize fund$35,000 (1971)
$60,000 (1970)
Month playedNovember (1971)
(primarily in early spring)
Final year1971
Final champion
United States George Johnson
Location Map
Wilmington is located in the United States
Wilmington
Wilmington
Location in United States
Wilmington is located in North Carolina
Wilmington
Wilmington
Location in North Carolina

The Azalea Open Invitational was a golf tournament in North Carolina on the PGA Tour, held at Cape Fear Country Club in Wilmington. Last played in November 1971 as an unofficial event;[1][2] it was an official PGA Tour event in 1945 and from 1949 through 1970. The Heritage in South Carolina debuted in 1969 and soon displaced it on the schedule.[3]

It was also played under the names of the Azalea Open and the Wilmington Azalea Open; all were centerpieces of the city's Azalea Festival. Cape Fear was designed by noted course architect Donald Ross.[3]

From 1950 through 1965, the Azalea Open was a tune-up event for the first major of the year, The Masters in Augusta, Georgia. Jerry Barber, the winner of the PGA Championship in 1961, won the Wilmington event three times (1953, 1961, 1963). Arnold Palmer won in 1957 and nearly repeated,[4] falling by a stroke in an 18-hole playoff in 1958; the difference was a penalty stroke he called on himself.[5][6]

Total prize money was initially $10,000, increasing to $12,500 in 1955 and $15,000 in 1958. It reduced to $12,000 in 1961 before increasing to $20,000 from 1962 to 1964. Prize money was $28,750 in 1965, $22,800 in 1966, $35,000 from 1967 to 1969 and $60,000 in 1970. The final non-tour event in 1971 had prize money of $35,000.

Tournament hosts

  • 1949–1971 – Cape Fear Country Club, Wilmington, North Carolina
  • 1945 – Mobile Country Club, Mobile, Alabama

Winners

Year Date Player Country Score To par Margin of
victory
Runner(s)-up Winner's
share ($)
Ref
Azalea Open Invitational
1971 Nov 21 George Johnson  United States 274 −10 Playoff United States Ralph Johnston 7,000 [1][2]
1970 Oct 4 Cesar Sanudo  Mexico 269 −15 1 stroke United States Bobby Mitchell 12,000 [7]
1969 Apr 20 Dale Douglass  United States 275 −9 3 strokes United States Jim Langley
United States Larry Mowry
United States Bob Stone
United States Terry Wilcox
5,000 [8]
1968 Apr 21 Steve Reid  United States 271 −13 Playoff South Africa Gary Player 5,000 [9]
1967 Apr 16 Randy Glover  United States 278 −10 Playoff United States Joe Campbell 5,000 [10]
1966 Apr 17 Bert Yancey  United States 278 −10 1 stroke United States Bob Johnson 3,200 [11]
1965 Mar 28 Dick Hart  United States 276 −12 Playoff United States Phil Rodgers 3,850 [12]
Azalea Open
1964 Mar 30 Al Besselink  United States 282 −6 1 stroke United States Lionel Hebert 2,700 [13]
1963 Mar 31 Jerry Barber (3)  United States 274 −14 5 strokes United States Larry Beck
Australia Bruce Crampton
United States Doug Ford
United States Billy Maxwell
United States Jack Rule, Jr.
2,800 [14]
1962 Apr 1 Dave Marr  United States 281 −7 Playoff United States Jerry Steelsmith 2,800 [15]
1961 Apr 2 Jerry Barber (2)  United States 213 −3 Playoff United States Chandler Harper 1,200 [16]
1960 Apr 3 Tom Nieporte  United States 277 −11 2 strokes United States Gay Brewer 2,000 [17]
1959 Mar 30 Art Wall Jr.  United States 282 −6 3 strokes United States Mike Souchak 2,000 [18]
1958 Mar 31 Howie Johnson  United States 282 −6 Playoff United States Arnold Palmer 2,000 [5][6]
1957 Mar 31 Arnold Palmer  United States 282 −6 1 stroke United States Dow Finsterwald 1,700 [4]
1956 Apr 1 Mike Souchak  United States 273 −15 1 stroke United States Dick Mayer 2,200 [19]
1955 Apr 3 Billy Maxwell  United States 270 −18 1 stroke United States Mike Souchak 2,200 [20]
1954 Mar 28 Bob Toski  United States 273 −15 3 strokes United States George Fazio 2,000 [21]
1953 Apr 5 Jerry Barber (1)  United States 276 −12 1 stroke United States Doug Ford
United States Ted Kroll
United States Johnny Palmer
2,000 [22]
1952 Mar 30 Jimmy Clark  United States 272 −16 3 strokes United States George Fazio
United States Jim Turnesa
2,000 [23][24]
Wilmington Azalea Open
1951 Apr 1 Lloyd Mangrum  United States 281 −7 1 stroke Australia Jim Ferrier
United States Ed Furgol
United States Jim Turnesa
2,000 [25][26]
1950 Apr 2 Dutch Harrison  United States 280 −8 2 strokes United States George Fazio 2,000 [27]
Wilmington Open
1949 Apr 24 Henry Ransom  United States 276 −12 2 strokes United States Fred Haas
United States Bob Hamilton
South Africa Bobby Locke
United States Cary Middlecoff
2,000 [28][29]
Azalea Open
1946 Al Besselink  United States (amateur; non-PGA Tour event)[citation needed]
1945 Nov 19 Sam Byrd  United States 283 −5 Playoff United States Dutch Harrison 2,000 [30][31]

References

  1. ^ a b c "George Johnson grabs Azalea golf tourney". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. (Florida). Associated Press. November 22, 1971. p. 31.
  2. ^ a b Collins, Corky (November 22, 1971). "Johnson wins Azalea in playoff". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). p. 1D.
  3. ^ a b Blondin, Alan (May 4, 2017). "Wilmington used to be home to star-studded PGA Tour event". PGA of America. Retrieved May 6, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Palmer captures Azalea by stroke". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 1, 1957. p. 1C.
  5. ^ a b "Johnson wins Azalea Open". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 1, 1958. p. 1C.
  6. ^ a b "Howie Johnson takes Azalea; penalty helps". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. April 1, 1958. p. 3, sec. 3.
  7. ^ "Sanudo by one". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. (Florida). Associated Press. October 5, 1970.
  8. ^ "Douglass gets 1st win". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). Associated Press. April 21, 1969. p. 11.
  9. ^ "Reid wins Azalea Open in sudden-death final". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 22, 1968. p. 6C.
  10. ^ "Glover tops Campbell to take Azalea play". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. (Florida). Associated Press. April 17, 1967. p. 12.
  11. ^ "Azalea win goes to Yancey". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. (Florida). Associated Press. April 18, 1966. p. 12.
  12. ^ "Hart captures Azalea playoff from Rodgers". Daytona Beach Morning Journal. (Florida). Associated Press. March 29, 1965. p. 12.
  13. ^ "Triple bogey doesn't keep Al Besselink from victory". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. March 31, 1964. p. 8.
  14. ^ "Golf event win taken by Barber". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. April 1, 1963. p. 20.
  15. ^ "Playoff won by Dave Marr". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. April 2, 1962. p. 17.
  16. ^ "It's sudden-death...and Barber is killer". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 3, 1961. p. 1C.
  17. ^ "Tom Nieporte golf victor". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. April 4, 1960. p. 26.
  18. ^ "Azalea Open won by Wall; Souchak 2d". Eugene Register-Guard. Oregon. Associated Press. March 31, 1959. p. 2B.
  19. ^ "Souchak takes Azalea Open". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 2, 1956. p. 16.
  20. ^ "Billy Maxwell rallies to win Azalea golf". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. April 4, 1955. p. 19.
  21. ^ "Toski's 273 takes first place Azalea Open money". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. March 30, 1954. p. 14.
  22. ^ "Barber wins Azalea Open". Eugene Register-Guard. (Oregon). United Press. April 6, 1953. p. 2B.
  23. ^ Williams, John (March 31, 1952). "Clark wins Azalea Open, breaks record with 272". Wilmington Morning Star. (North Carolina). p. 1.
  24. ^ "Clark cards 272 to take Azalea Open". St. Petersburg Times. (Florida). Associated Press. March 31, 1952. p. 20.
  25. ^ "Mangrum wins Azalea tournament". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. April 2, 1951. p. 9.
  26. ^ "Lloyd Mangrum wins in Azalea". The Spokesman-Review. (Washington). Associated Press. April 2, 1951. p. 8.
  27. ^ "Dutch Harrison wins Azalea Open". Sarasota Herald-Tribune. (Florida). Associated Press. April 3, 1950. p. 10.
  28. ^ "Henry Ransom Wins $10,000 Tourney". The Spokesman-Review. (Washington). Associated Press. April 25, 1949. p. 8.
  29. ^ "Wilmington Open taken by Ransom". Chicago Daily Tribune. Associated Press. April 25, 1949. p. 1, sec.4.
  30. ^ "Byrd, Harrison Finish in a Tie". The Spokesman-Review. (Washington). Associated Press. November 19, 1945. p. 9.
  31. ^ "Sam Byrd Cops Azalea Crown". The Spokesman-Review. (Washington). Associated Press. November 20, 1945. p. 8.

External links

This page was last edited on 11 January 2021, at 21:20
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.