To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Axidares of Armenia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Axidares of Armenia
King of Armenia
Reign110–113
PredecessorSanatruk
SuccessorParthamasiris
Died113
HouseArsacid
FatherPacorus II

Axidares or Ashkhadar also known as Exedares[1] or Exedates[2] (flourished second half of the 1st century & first half of the 2nd century, died 113) was a Parthian Prince who served as a Roman Client King of Armenia.

Axidares was one of the three sons born to the King Pacorus II of Parthia[3] by an unnamed mother. Through his father he was a member of the House of Parthia thus a relation of the Arsacid dynasty of Armenia.[4] Little is known of his life prior to becoming Armenian King.

Axidares succeeded his relative Sanatruces (Sanatruk) as Armenian King when he died in 110. He was put on the Armenian throne by his paternal uncle, the King Osroes I of Parthia without Roman consultation.[5] Axidares was King of Armenia from 110 until 113.

Although the Romans supported Axidares' Kingship over Armenia, Trajan viewed the action by his uncle as an invitation to war with Parthia.[6] Osroes I considered Axidares as incapable of governing.[7] To avoid to going to war with the Roman emperor Trajan and keep peace with him, Osroes I deposed Axidares from his Armenian throne and replaced him with his other brother Parthamasiris for the Armenian Kingship.[8][9]

References

  1. ^ Mommsen, The provinces of the Roman Empire: from Caesar to Domitian, p.66
  2. ^ Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, p.150
  3. ^ Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, p.151
  4. ^ Farrokh, Shadows in the Desert: Ancient Persia at War, p.158
  5. ^ Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, p.87
  6. ^ Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, p.303
  7. ^ Mommsen, The provinces of the Roman Empire: from Caesar to Domitian, p.66
  8. ^ Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, p.p.150&151
  9. ^ Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, p.87

Sources

  • D.T. Potts, Araby the Blest: Studies in Arabian Archaeology, Museum Tusculanum Press, 1988
  • Yarshater, The Cambridge History of Iran, Volume 3, Cambridge University Press, 1993
  • M. Bunson, A Dictionary of the Roman Empire, Oxford University Press, 1995
  • T. Mommsen, W. Purdie Dickson & F. Haverfield, The provinces of the Roman Empire: from Caesar to Domitian, Gorgias Press LLC, 2004
  • K. Farrokh, Shadows in the Desert: Ancient Persia at War, Osprey Publishing, 2007
This page was last edited on 22 February 2021, at 11:55
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.