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At the Villa Rose (1930 film)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

At the Villa Rose
Directed byLeslie S. Hiscott
Produced byHenry Edwards
Julius Hagen
Written byA.E.W. Mason (novel)
Cyril Twyford
StarringNorah Baring
Richard Cooper
Austin Trevor
Music byJohn Greenwood
CinematographySydney Blythe
Distributed byWarner Brothers (UK)
British International Pictures (US)
Release date
  • 30 May 1930 (1930-05-30) (U.S.)
Running time
99 minutes (UK)
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

At the Villa Rose is a 1930 British mystery film directed by Leslie S. Hiscott and starring Norah Baring, Richard Cooper and Northern Irish Actor Austin Trevor.[1] It marked Trevor's screen debut. It was released in the United States under the alternative title of Mystery at the Villa Rose.[2]

Production

The film is based on the 1910 novel At the Villa Rose by A.E.W. Mason[3] and features his fictional detective Inspector Hanaud. It was made at Twickenham Film Studios in St Margarets, Middlesex. A French-language version The Mystery of the Villa Rose was made simultaneously at Twickenham and the production was announced as being the first bilingual film made in Britain.[4]

Cast

Critical reception

The New York Times wrote, ""Mystery at the Villa Rose," a British audible film of A. E. W. Mason's novel, "At the Villa Rose," which is now at the Cameo, is baffling in more ways than one, for the vocal reproduction often is so "tubby" that it is not always possible to understand what the players are saying. The original story possessed possibilities for quite a good picture, but this screen effort has been handled so amateurishly that one really does not care who poisoned Madame D'Auvray."[5]

References

  1. ^ "At the Villa Rose (1930)". BFI. Archived from the original on 11 July 2012.
  2. ^ "Mystery at the Villa Rose (1930) - Leslie Hiscott - Synopsis, Characteristics, Moods, Themes and Related - AllMovie".
  3. ^ "Mystery at the Villa Rose (1930)". The New York Times. Retrieved 31 May 2012.
  4. ^ Richards p.41-42
  5. ^ Mordaunt Hall (2 June 1930). "Movie Review - THE SCREEN; Other Photo Plays". The New York Times.

Bibliography

  • Richards, Jeffrey (ed.) The Unknown 1930s: An Alternative History of the British Cinema, 1929-1939. I.B. Tauris, 1998.

External links

This page was last edited on 2 January 2021, at 03:14
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