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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Asia Satellite Telecommunications Holdings
TypePrivate
IndustrySatellite communication
Founded1988[citation needed]
Headquarters
  • Hong Kong (de facto)
  • Bermuda (registered office)
BrandsAsiaSat
RevenueIncrease HK$1.354 billion[1]:62 (2017)
Increase HK$0642 million[1]:62 (2017)
Decrease HK$0397 million[1]:62 (2017)
Total assetsDecrease HK$7.401 billion[1]:63 (2017)
Total equityIncrease HK$3.353 billion[1]:63 (2017)
OwnerCITICCarlyle consortium (74.43%)
ParentBowenvale
Websitewww.asiasat.com
Footnotes / references
in consolidated financial statement[1]

Asia Satellite Telecommunications Holdings Limited, known by its brand name AsiaSat, is a commercial operator of communication spacecraft. AsiaSat, based in Hong Kong, is incorporated in Bermuda.

AsiaSat is jointly owned by Chinese state-owned CITIC Limited and private equity fund The Carlyle Group L.P. indirectly. It had a market capitalization of HK$billion on 30 November 2018.[2] It was a red chip company of the stock exchange.[2] On 23 August 2019, the take private proposal scheme was approved by AsiaSat's public shareholders, followed by the approval of the Bermuda Court on 3 September 2019, whereupon the Company became a private wholly owned subsidiary of Bowenvale Limited, a joint venture of CITIC and Carlyle. The listing of the company's shares was withdrawn from the Stock Exchange of Hong Kong on 5 September 2019.[3]

History

In September 2017, AsiaSat 9, AsiaSat's latest satellite built by Space Systems/Loral[4] was successfully launched and replaced AsiaSat 4 at 122 degrees east.

AsiaSat owns and operates seven satellites, including AsiaSat 3S, AsiaSat 4, AsiaSat 5, AsiaSat 6, AsiaSat 7, AsiaSat 8 and the new AsiaSat 9.

Shareholders

As of 31 December 2017, the direct parent company, Bowenvale Limited, owned 74.43% shares; Bowenvale was jointly owned by CITIC Limited and The Carlyle Group LP in a 50–50 ratio.[1]:54 Standard Life Aberdeen plc was the second largest shareholder for 5.36%.[1]:54 In May 2018, the ratio owned by Standard Life Aberdeen had decreased to 4.99%.[5] In November 2018, another private equity firm International Value Advisers owned 6.12% shares of AsiaSat.[6]

On 3 September 2019 following the approval of the privatisation plan by public shareholders, Asia Satellite Telecommunications Holdings Limited became a privately wholly owned subsidiary of Bowenvale Limited, which is now jointly owned by CITIC Group Corporation and Carlyle Asia Partners IV, L.P.[3]

Launch history and future plans

This is a list of AsiaSat satellites.

AsiaSat satellites
Satellite Launch Date
(UTC)
Rocket Launch Site Contractor Longitude Status Notes Ref.
AsiaSat 1 7 April 1990 China Long March 3 China Xichang LC-3 China CASC Decommissioned Launched as Westar 6 on Space Shuttle mission STS-41B, became stranded in orbit, was retrieved by Space Shuttle mission STS-51A in November 1984, sold to AsiaSat.
AsiaSat 2 28 November 1995 China Long March 2E China Xichang LC-2 China CASC 100.5° East Decommissioned
AsiaSat 3 24 December 1997 Russia Proton-K / DM-2M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/23 Russia United States ILS 105.5° East (intended)
158° West (1998)
62° West (1999–2002)
Decommissioned Transferred to Hughes Global Services
AsiaSat 3S 21 March 1999 Russia Proton-K / DM-2M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 81/23 Russia United States ILS 147.5° East In Service Replaced AsiaSat 1 in May 1999. [7]
AsiaSat 4 12 April 2003 United States Atlas IIIB United States Cape Canaveral LC-36B Russia United States ILS Relocated to a designated orbital slot in November 2017 In Service [8]
AsiaSat 5 11 August 2009 Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States ILS 100.5° East In Service A replacement satellite for AsiaSat 2 [9]
AsiaSat 6 / Thaicom 7 7 September 2014 United States Falcon 9 v1.1 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX 120° East In Service [10]
AsiaSat 7 25 November 2011 Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Enhanced Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States ILS 105.5° East In Service Replaced AsiaSat 3S at the orbital location of 105.5° East. [11]
AsiaSat 8 5 August 2014 United States Falcon 9 v1.1 United States Cape Canaveral SLC-40 United States SpaceX 4° W In Service AsiaSat satellite with multiple Ku beams. [12]
AsiaSat 9 28 September 2017 Russia Proton-M / Briz-M Kazakhstan Baikonur Site 200/39 Russia United States ILS 122° East In Service Replaced AsiaSat 4 at 122 degrees east. [13]

See also

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "2017 Annual Report" (PDF). Asia Satellite Telecommunications Holdings. 27 April 2017. Retrieved 26 July 2017.
  2. ^ a b "List of Red Chip Companies (Main Board)". Hong Kong Exchanges and Clearing. 30 November 2018. Retrieved 6 December 2018.
  3. ^ a b "AsiaSat shareholders approve privatisation proposal" (PDF).
  4. ^ de Selding, Peter B. (2015-03-27). "AsiaSat Results Reflect Troop Withdrawals, Capacity Glut". Space News. Retrieved 29 March 2015.
  5. ^ 【權益變動】亞洲衛星(01135-HK)遭基金減持9.35萬股 涉資60.3萬. Finet (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Financial Holdings Limited. 30 May 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  6. ^ 【權益變動】亞洲衛星(01135-HK)獲International Value增持464萬股. Finet (in Chinese). Hong Kong: Financial Holdings Limited. 19 November 2018. Retrieved 7 December 2018.
  7. ^ "AsiaSat 3S". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 18 January 2014. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  8. ^ "AsiaSat 4". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  9. ^ "AsiaSat 5". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 23 October 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  10. ^ "AsiaSat 6". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  11. ^ "AsiaSat 7". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  12. ^ "AsiaSat 8". AsiaSat. Archived from the original on 7 December 2013. Retrieved 7 January 2014.
  13. ^ Bergin, Chris (28 September 2017). "ILS Proton M successfully launches AsiaSat-9". Retrieved 28 September 2017.

External links

This page was last edited on 4 January 2021, at 13:37
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