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Arthur Maria Rabenalt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Arthur Maria Rabenalt
Born(1905-06-25)25 June 1905
Vienna, Austria-Hungary (now Austria)
Died26 February 1993(1993-02-26) (aged 87)
Kreuth, Germany
OccupationFilm director
Years active1934–1978

Arthur Maria Rabenalt (25 June 1905 – 26 February 1993) was an Austrian film director, writer, and author.[1] He directed more than 90 films between 1934 and 1978. His 1958 film That Won't Keep a Sailor Down was entered into the 1st Moscow International Film Festival.[2] Two years later, his 1960 film Big Request Concert was entered into the 2nd Moscow International Film Festival.[3] His career encompassed both Nazi cinema and West German productions. He also wrote several books on the 1930s and 1940s wave of German cinema.[4]

Career

In his early teens, Rabenalt began his stage career directing operas at theatres in Darmstadt, Berlin and Gera. From then on to the mid-1920s he worked (though uncredited) as a production assistant on several films such including G. W. Pabst's Joyless Street (1925).[5] After Nazi's rise to power, Rabenalt made his feature film debut directing the musical comedy, What Am I Without You (1934), which was then shortly followed with the release of the comedy Pappi (1934). He continued to work in different genres, including The Love of the Maharaja (1936), and Men Are That Way and Midsummer Night's Fire which were released in 1939.

Through out the 1940s, Rabaenalt worked with melodramatic dramas and comedy. Some of his early films in the 1940s, such as Riding for Germany, supported Nazi ideology. In 1989, he said "I had only made circus films and chamber-type entertainment films since 1941. The only Nazi film I knew was ... rides for Germany (1941), and it was admired. The first films of mine that were distributed again after the war were Circus Renz (1943) and Regimental Music (shot in 1944 under the title The Guilty of Gabriele Rottweil, the film only came to the cinemas in 1950). The controversy about ... rides for Germany came much later.[6]

After the war he resumed his stage career as a director, beginning with the East German production, Chemistry and Love (1948), satire on anti-capitalism based on a play by Bela Balasz. He continued to work on productions for East German state studio DEFA until 1948. In the 1950s, he moved into more mainstream entertainment,[1] including the Weimar horror remake of Alraune (1952), which starred Hildegard Knef and Erich von Stroheim.

From 1960, Rabanalt worked only in television, adapting classic comedies and operettas for a mainstream audience. He also wrote several erotic pulp fiction books as well as memoirs and factual books about Nazi Germany.[citation needed]

Selected filmography

Published books

  • Tanz and Film [1] (1960)
  • Das Theater der Lust (1982)
  • Theater ohne Tabu [2] (Emsdetten, 1970)
  • Der Operetten-Bildband Bühne Film Fernsehen [3] (1980)
  • Mimus eroticus [4] (Hamburg, 1965/67)
  • Joseph Goebbels und der Grossdeutsche Film [5] (Munich, 1985)
  • Gesammelte Schriften [6] (Hildesheim, 1999)

References

  1. ^ a b "Arthur Maria Rabenalt". defa.de. Retrieved 28 October 2012.
  2. ^ "1st Moscow International Film Festival (1959)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 28 October 2012.
  3. ^ "2nd Moscow International Film Festival (1961)". MIFF. Archived from the original on 16 January 2013. Retrieved 6 November 2012.
  4. ^ The concise Cinegraph : encyclopaedia of German cinema. Bock, Hans-Michael,, Bergfelder, Tim. New York. September 2009. ISBN 978-0-85745-565-9. OCLC 949668752.CS1 maint: others (link)
  5. ^ The concise Cinegraph : encyclopaedia of German cinema. Bock, Hans-Michael,, Bergfelder, Tim. New York. September 2009. ISBN 978-0-85745-565-9. OCLC 949668752.CS1 maint: others (link)
  6. ^ Sudendorf, Werner. "Arthur Maria Rabenalt: Interview | Alte Filme" (in German). Retrieved 1 May 2020.

External links

This page was last edited on 1 October 2020, at 13:26
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