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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Arcimoto
Public company
Traded asNASDAQFUV
Russell Microcap Index component
IndustryAutomotive
FoundedNovember 2007; 12 years ago (2007-11) in Eugene, Oregon
FounderMark Frohnmayer
Headquarters
Eugene, Oregon
,
United States
ProductsElectric vehicles
Websitearcimoto.com

Arcimoto is an electric vehicle company headquartered in Eugene, Oregon that manufactures and sells the Fun Utility Vehicle, or FUV, a tandem two-seat, three-wheeled electric vehicle.[1]

FUV

The company's first vehicle, the Fun Utility Vehicle, or FUV, [2] is a tandem two-seat three wheeled electric motorcycle with an EPA-rated range of 102 city miles per charge [3] and a fuel economy of 173.7 MPGe at city driving speeds.[4] The FUV is freeway capable, with a maximum speed of 75 mph (121 km/h). The Company officially launched production and delivery of the retail Fun Utility Vehicle on September 19, 2019.[5]

Founding

The company's founder, Mark Frohnmayer, is the son of politician and former dean and president of the University of Oregon, David B. Frohnmayer. Frohnmayer founded Arcimoto in November 2007 after he sold his previous company, GarageGames.

Development History

Arcimoto has designed and built eight generations of three-wheeled electric vehicle prototypes.[6]

On September 23, 2009, Arcimoto debuted the Pulse, with an estimated $20,000 price, taking pre-orders for $500.[7] The Pulse is now considered a Generation 3 prototype by the company.[6]

Arcimoto revealed their fifth prototype, and the first SRK, on April 23, 2011. According to Frohnmayer, actor Nathan Fillion drove their vehicle and came out saying it was like driving a shark, which is where the name SRK came from.[8] This model added extra power (89 hp) and four body designs on a common chassis.[9] According to Frohnmayer, Generation 6 SRK, revealed in April 2012, was to be the pilot with 14 vehicles produced, 10 of which already had committed purchasers, then the pilot run had been increased to 40 units, sold for $41,000 each. Some time later, Generation 7 was expected to be the mass production model in late 2012[8] but the Company determined it was too large and heavy to create a viable market solution and opted to develop an eighth prototype generation that featured handlebars instead of a steering wheel.[10] The change in steering and occupant packaging dropped an estimated 600 lbs. from the vehicle design.

See also

References

  1. ^ "Arcimoto Charges Ahead With First Deliveries of Electric FUVs".
  2. ^ "Arcimoto - The Everyday Electric". Arcimoto. Retrieved May 31, 2018.
  3. ^ Gitlin, Jonathan M. (January 9, 2016). "The Arcimoto FUV electric vehicle is the most fun thing we did at CES". Ars Technica. Condé Nast. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  4. ^ "Arcimoto Begins Retail Production and Delivery of Ultra-Efficient, Pure-Electric Fun Utility Vehicles".
  5. ^ "Let The FUV Begin: EV Startup Arcimoto Starts Retail Production Of All-Electric Three-Wheeler".
  6. ^ a b "Arcimoto History - The Story of the FUV". Arcimoto. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  7. ^ Heldler, Jason (September 27, 2009). "Arcimoto Pulse - 3 Wheel Electric Vehicle". Green Car Reports. Retrieved August 16, 2019.
  8. ^ a b Said by Frohnmayer during an in-class presentation on 7 February 2012 at Oregon State University.
  9. ^ "SRK". Arcimoto. Archived from the original on April 26, 2011. Retrieved April 24, 2011.
  10. ^ Finley, Klint (October 18, 2015). "The Key to Cheap Electric Cars? Ditch the Steering Wheel". Wired. Condé Nast. Retrieved December 2, 2015.

External links

This page was last edited on 11 September 2020, at 17:50
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