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Archdeacons in the Diocese in Europe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The archdeacons in the Diocese in Europe are senior clergy of the Church of England Diocese in Europe. They each have responsibility over their own archdeaconry, of which there are currently seven, each of which is composed of one or more deaneries, which are composed in turn of chaplaincies (as opposed to the parishes of the mainland and Manx dioceses).

They share this task with running a local church in their area, although the Diocese in Europe was (as of 2012) working towards a new system whereby there would be four full-time archdeacons instead.[1] Colin Williams became a full-time Archdeacon for both the Eastern archdeaconry and that of Germany and Northern Europe ("Archdeacon of Europe")[2][3] in September 2015, based in Frankfurt, Germany;[4] his successor, Leslie Nathaniel is full-time in both roles together.[5] David Waller is now also archdeacon of two archdeaconries: Gibraltar and Italy & Malta.[6] It is also intended that the next Archdeacon of France (full-time) will also, eventually, become Archdeacon of Switzerland.[7]

In 1866, the Diocese of Gibraltar had two archdeaconries: Gibraltar and Malta.[8] The current roles of archdeacons are set down in the diocese's 1995 constitution.[9]

Archdeacons of Gibraltar

The archdeaconry covers the Western Mediterranean, including Andorra, Spain, Portugal, Morocco, Madeira and the Balearic and Canary Islands. The area deaneries include Algarve (Portugal), Puerto de la Cruz (Tenerife) and Palma de Mallorca.[10] In 2013, the archdeaconry synod voted to change its name to "Iberia and Gibraltar",[11] but this change has not been effected. The Cathedral Church is that of the Holy Trinity in Gibraltar.

The archdeacon is David Waller, also of Italy and Malta.

Archdeacons of Malta, of Malta and of Italy and Malta

The archdeaconry covers the Central Mediterranean including Italy, Sicily and Malta. There is a Pro-Cathedral of St Paul in Valletta, Malta.[10]

The archdeacon in David Waller, also of Gibraltar.

Until 1978, the title was Archdeacon in/of Malta:
Records indicate that, from 1865 until 1925, the chaplain in Valletta was also archdeacon of Malta:
In 1925, a third archdeaconry was created and the relationship between the two roles seems to have ended:
Evans is recorded as Archdeacon in Italy after he was Archdeacon of Malta; the former may have been simply a renaming of the latter, especially since he retained his chaplaincy.
Devenport is referred to retrospectively as Archdeacon of Italy and Malta,[51] but his successors have all used that form:
  • 1998–2000 (res.): Bill Edebohls, chaplain of Milan[52]
  • 2000–2003 (res.): Gordon Reid, chaplain of Milan with Lake Como and Genoa[53]
  • 2003–2005: vacancy?
  • 2005–2009 (ret.): Arthur Siddall, chaplain of Naples with Sorrento, Capri and Bari (until 2007), Archdeacon of Switzerland and chaplain of Montreux with Anzere, Gstaad and Monthey (from 2007)[54]
  • 2009 – January 2016 (res.):[55] Jonathan Boardman, chaplain of Rome[56]
  • 27 January 2016 – February 2019 (ret.): Vickie Sims, chaplain of Milan[57][58]
  • February 2019 – 6 November 2019 (ret.):[26] Geoff Johnston, Archdeacon of Gibraltar, Acting Archdeacon of Italy and Malta[58]
  • 14 January 2020 – present: David Waller, also Archdeacon of Gibraltar[6]

Archdeacons of the Aegean and of the Eastern Archdeaconry

The Eastern Archdeaconry covers Eastern Europe – the Greater Athens deanery (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Greece, the Republic of Macedonia, Montenegro, Romania, Serbia and Turkey), the Moscow deanery (Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kosovo, Moldova, Mongolia, Poland, Russia, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan, based at St Andrew's, Moscow ) and the area for which the archdeacon takes direct responsibility (Austria, Croatia, Czech Republic, Hungary, Slovakia and Slovenia). The title was Archdeacon of the Aegean until 1994.

Before 1994, the archdeaconry was called the Aegean.
After Evans' resignation, the archdeaconry was renamed the Eastern Archdeaconry.
  • 1995–2000 (ret.): Jeremy Peake, chaplain of Vienna (from 1998)[64]
  • 2002–2015: Patrick Curran, chaplain of Vienna with Prague[25]
  • October 2015 – 1 April 2019 (ret.):[65] Colin Williams (as Archdeacon of the Eastern archdeaconry and of Germany and Northern Europe)
  • 1 April – 17 October 2019: Adèle Kelham, Archdeacon of Switzerland and Acting Archdeacon of the East[10]
  • 17 October 2019 – present: Leslie Nathaniel (also Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe)[66]

Archdeacons of the Riviera

The Archdeaconry of the Riviera was subsumed into the Archdeaconry of France c. 1995.[67] Archdeacons described as Archdeacon of the Riviera included:

Archdeacons of North-West Europe

The area deaneries comprise Belgium & Luxembourg (based at St. Boniface Church, Antwerp) and The Netherlands (based at Christ Church, Amsterdam). There is a Pro-Cathedral of the Holy Trinity, Brussels.[25] Before the expansion of the diocese in 1980 and erection of Holy Trinity into a Pro-Cathedral, this archdeaconry was called Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands; it had its origin in 1977, and was the first archdeaconry of the diocese.[72]

The bishop's domestic chaplain, Meurig Williams, was acting archdeacon of North-West Europe from 2012 until 2016.[25]

Archdeacons of Northern France, of France and of France and Monaco

The Archdeaconry of France consists of all of France and Monaco and includes the Maisons-Lafitte deanery. As archdeacon, Meurig Williams, was based in Brussels (where he was the bishop's chaplain.) The two area deaneries are those of Lille (based at Christ Church, Lille) and Mid-Pyrenees & Aude. Before the mid-to-late 1990s, the post was called Archdeacon of Northern France.

By 1997, Draper was known as Archdeacon of France; his successors have borne this form of the title.
  • 2002–2006 (ret.): Anthony Wells, chaplain of St Michael's, Paris[88]
  • 2007–30 June 2012 (ret.): Ken Letts, chaplain of Holy Trinity, Nice with Vence[89]
  • 25 October 2013 – 30 September 2016 (ret.):[90] Ian Naylor, chaplain of Pau (until October 2015;[91] acting archdeacon 2012–2013)[92]
  • 29 September 2016[93]–1 January 2021 (res.):[94] Meurig Williams, bishop's domestic chaplain and Archdeacon of France and Monaco

In 2020, the diocese is advertising for a new, full-time Archdeacon of France — it is intended that the appointee will later also become Archdeacon of Switzerland.[7] The Diocese has announced that the next archdeacon, Peter Hooper will start work on 15 February 2021 as Acting Archdeacon until his collation later in the year.[95]

Archdeacons of Switzerland

The archdeacon, Peter Potter, has been chaplain of Berne since 2008. He also served as Acting Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe. Some sources show that Quin and Hawker were referred to as "Archdeacon in Switzerland."

Kelham has taken up the full role but is called "acting" archdeacon solely because she is older than the Church's mandatory retirement age.[105] In advertising for a new, full-time Archdeacon of France, the Diocese has stated its intention that the appointee will also become Archdeacon of Switzerland after Kelham's eventual retirement.[7]

Archdeacons of Scandinavia and of Germany and Northern Europe

The two area deaneries are those of Germany (based at St George's, Berlin) and The Nordic and Baltic States, including Norway, Sweden, Iceland, Denmark, Finland, Estonia and Latvia (based in Goteborg, Sweden).[25]

Following the resignation of Jonathan Lloyd, the Archdeacon of Switzerland, Peter Potter, became acting archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe[106] until the licensing in October of Colin Williams as the new full-time Archdeacon for Eastern and Northern Europe.[4]

Prior to 2005, the archdeaconry was called Scandinavia.
  • 1980–1989 (res.): Brian Horlock, chaplain of Oslo with Bergen, Trondheim and Stavanger[107]
  • 1990–1995 (ret.): Gerald Brown, chaplain of Oslo with Bergen, Trondheim, Stavanger etc. (until 1992) and of Stockholm with Gävle & Västerås (from 1992)[108]
  • 1996–2005 (ret.): David Ratcliff, Archdeacon of Scandinavia and Germany, chaplain of Frankfurt-am-Main (until 1998), and of Stockholm with Gävle & Västerås (from 1998)[109]
Since 2005, the archdeaconry has been called Germany and Northern Europe.
  • 2005–2008 (res.): Mark Oakley, chaplain of Copenhagen[110]
  • 2008–2010: vacancy?
  • 20 January 2010[111]–March 2014 (res.):[112] Jonathan Lloyd, chaplain of Copenhagen with Aarhus
  • March 2014 – 2015 (Acting): the Archdeacon of Switzerland, Acting Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe[106]

  • October 2015 – 1 April 2019 (ret.):[65] Colin Williams (as Archdeacon of the Eastern archdeaconry and of Germany and Northern Europe)
  • 1 April – 17 October 2019: John Newsome, Area Dean of Germany and Acting Archdeacon of Germany and Northern Europe[10]
  • 17 October 2019 – present: Leslie Nathaniel (also Archdeacon of the East)[66]

Other archdeacons

From 1922 until 1929, Thomas Buckton, sometime chaplain of Nice, was Archdeacon in Spain and North Africa[113] or Archdeacon in the Peninsula and North Africa[15] before he was Archdeacon of Gibraltar and while there was another Archdeacon of Gibraltar in post.

From 1931 until his death on 29 June 1943, Edward Eliot was Archdeacon in Italy and the French Riviera and a canon of Gibraltar.[114]

From 1996 until 1998, Gordon Reid, vicar-general of the Diocese in Europe and (from 1997) priest-in-charge at St Michael, Cornhill was Archdeacon in Europe.[53]

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