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Archbishop of Armagh

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

St Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral, Armagh, the episcopal seat of the pre-Reformation and Church of Ireland archbishops.
St Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral, Armagh, the episcopal seat of the pre-Reformation and Church of Ireland archbishops.
St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Armagh, the episcopal seat of the post-Reformation Catholic archbishops.
St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Armagh, the episcopal seat of the post-Reformation Catholic archbishops.

The Archbishop of Armagh is an archiepiscopal title which takes its name from the city of Armagh in Northern Ireland. Since the Reformation, there have been parallel apostolic successions to the title: one in the Roman Catholic Church and the other in the Church of Ireland. The archbishop of each denomination also holds the title of Primate of All Ireland.

In the Church of Ireland, the archbishop is John McDowell, who is the ecclesiastical head of the Church of Ireland and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Armagh.[1] He was elected as archbishop in March 2020 and translated to the role on 28 April 2020.[2][3]

In the Roman Catholic Church, the archbishop is Eamon Martin, who is the ecclesiastical head of the Roman Catholic Church in Ireland, metropolitan of the Province of Armagh and the ordinary of the Archdiocese of Armagh. He succeeded on 8 September 2014, having been ordained Coadjutor Archbishop of Armagh on 21 April 2013 at St Patrick's Roman Catholic Cathedral, Armagh.[4]

History

In the medieval Irish church, the earliest bishops doubled as abbots, with the bishop becoming the junior of the two positions. From the 8th century, if not earlier, the house of Armagh claimed foundation from Saint Patrick, and the position of comarba Pátraic ("successor of Patrick") was held by the abbot of Armagh until the position of abbot and bishop were merged again in the 12th century, with the creation of the archbishopric of Armagh.

Early abbots and bishops of Armagh

Early abbots and bishops of Armagh
Tenure Ordinary Notes.
dates uncertain Saint Patrick
Irish: Pátraic
Founder of the bishopric in around 444; resigned, but date unknown; died 17 March, but the year is uncertain, the Annals of Ulster record the repose (i.e., death) of three bishops of the same name in 457, 461 and 493; also known as Patricius or St Patrick.
d. 447/8 (or 457) (Saint Secundinus
Irish: Sechnall mac Restituit)
Occurs in the list in the Book of Leinster; served as an assistant to Bishop Pátraic; considered to be the founder of Dunshaughlin (Domnach Seachnaill); died 27 November 447/8 (or 457); also known as Seachnaill and St Secundinius.[5]
dates uncertain (Sen-Phátraic) Occurs in the list in the Book of Leinster, but may not really existed; his name means "Old Patrick"; died 24 August, but the year not recorded, however, the Annals of Ulster record the "repose (i.e., death) of the elder Patrick" in 457.
d. 467/8 Benignus of Armagh
(Saint Benan; Benén mac Sescnén)
Died 9 November 467 or 468.
d. 481 Saint Iarlaithe mac Treno Died 11 February 481; also known as Saint Jarlath.
d. 497 Saint Cormac of Armagh Called bishop and abbot; styled heres Patricii in the Annals of Ulster, 'first abbot' in the official list; died 17 February 497.
d. 513 Dubthach the First Called bishop; also known as Dubtach.
d. 526 Saint Ailill the First Called bishop; died 13 January 526; also known as Ailid or Olild .
d. 536 Saint Ailill the Second Called bishop; died 1 July 536; also known as Ailid.
d. 548 Saint Dubthach the Second Called abbot; perhaps identical with Bishop 'Dauid Farannaini' (Dauid mac Guairi ui Farannáin), whose death is appended in a late hand in the Annals of Ulster in 551; also known as Duach, but see entry for Fiachra mac Colmain.
d. 558 Saint Fiachra mac Colmain Called abbot.
d. 578 Saint Fedelmid Find Called abbot.
d. 588 Saint Carláen Called bishop; died 24 March 588; also known as Cairlan, Ciarláech and Cairellán.
d. 598 Eochu macDiarmaid Called abbot; also recorded as Eochaid.
d. 610 Saint Senach Called abbot.
d. 623 Saint Mac Laisre Called abbot; died 12 September 623.
d. 661 Saint Tómméne Called bishop; died 10 January 661; also recorded as St Tommine .
d. 688 Saint Ségéne Called bishop; died 24 May 688; after Ségéne the Book of Leinster inserts an unnamed Forannán with the reign of 1 year.
d. 715 Saint Fland Feblae mac Scandláin Called abbot and bishop.
d. 730 Saint Suibne Called bishop; died 21 June 730; also known as Suibne nepos mac Crundmaíl or Suibne nepos Mruichessaich.
d. 750 Congus Called bishop (also scribe)
Source(s):[6][7]

Later abbots and bishops of Armagh

Abbots of Armagh

Later abbots of Armagh
Tenure Ordinary Notes.
d. 758 Célé Petair Also known as Céile Petair from Crích Bresail, or Cele-Peter.
d. 768 Saint Fer dá Chrích mac Suibni
? res. c. 772 Cú Dínaisc mac Conasaig Possibly resigned c. 772; died 791.
d. 793 Dub dá Leithe I mac Sínaig Member of the Clann Sinaig.
dep. 793 Fóendelach mac Móenaig Deposed.
d. 794 Airechtach ua Fáeláin Died on the same night as Bishop Affiath; also known as Airechtach grandson of Faelán alias grandson of Fledach.
d. 795 Fóendelach mac Móenaig (again) Re-installed.
d. 806 Gormgal mac Dindataig Also abbot of Clones; omitted from the list together with Fland Roí mac Cummascaig, who took the abbey by force (his grandfather, Conchobar, was killed in 698), rival to Fóendelach; also known as Gormgal mac Dindanaig, mac Dindagaid, or mac Indnotaig.
d. 807 Condmach mac Duib dá Leithe Member of the Clann Sinaig; in opposition to abbots Fóendelach and Gormgal; recognised as coarb in the Annals of Ulster in 804.
d. 808 Torbach mac Gormáin Died 16 July 808.
d. 809 Toicthech ua Tigernaig Not in the official list.
d. 812 Saint Nuadu of Loch Uama Also bishop of Armagh and anchorite.
d. 826 Flandgus mac Loingsig Also known as Fergus mac Loingsig.
deposed 827/8 Artrí mac Conchobair Acted as abbot and Coarb (or possibly on behalf of Flandgus) in 818, 823, 825; also was bishop of Armagh from 794; died 833.
d. 830 (? Suibne mac Forandáin) Called Abbas duorum mensium in the Annals of Ulster, and abbot of Devenish in the Chronicon Scotorum; not in the official list; also known as Suibne mac Fairnig.
d. 834 Eógan Mainistrech mac Ainbthig Also fer léigind (i.e., Lector) of Monasterboice and (since 830) abbot of Clonard.
d. 852 Forindán mac Murgile Rival abbot to Diarmait ua Tigernáin; also bishop of Armagh and scribe.
d. 852 Diarmait ua Tigernáin Rival abbot to Forindán mac Murgile.
d. 856 (? Cathassach) Only in the Annals of Inisfallen and the Fragmentary Annals of Ireland; but the Annals of the Four Masters call him fer tigis (i.e., oeconomus).
d. 874 Féthgno mac Nechtain Also bishop of Armagh; died 6 October 874.
deposed 877 Máel Cobo mac Crundmaíl Deposed 877.
deposed 877/8 Ainmere ua Fáeláin Deposed 877/8, died 879.
restored 877/8 Máel Cobo mac Crundmaíl (again) Restored 877/8; the four years assigned to his successor Cathassach mac Robartaig, who died in retirement in 883, suggests that Máel Cobo's capture by the Norse in 879 put an end to his tenure of office; died 888 .
d. 883 Cathassach mac Robartaig Also bishop of Armagh.
d. 927 Máel Brigte mac Tornáin Also Coarb of Colum Cille in 891.
d. 936 Ioseph mac Fathaig Also bishop of Armagh and anchorite; also known as Joseph .
d. 936 Máel Pátraic mac Máel Tuile Also bishop of Armagh.
d. 957 Cathassach mac Doilgén Also bishop of Armagh.
dep. 965 Muiredach mac Fergussa Deposed 965; died 966.
d. 998 Dub dá Leithe II mac Cellaig Member of the Clann Sinaig; also Coarb of Colum Cille in 989.
resigned 1001 Muirecén mac Ciaracáin Of "Both Domnaig" (Bodoney, County Tyrone); acting as Coarb 993; resigned 1001, died 1005.
d. 1020 Máel Muire mac Eochada Member of the Clann Sinaig; son of fer léigind Eochaid ua Flainn (died 1004) and nephew of Abbot Dub dá Leithe II (died 998); died in office 1020.
d. 1049 Amalgaid mac Máel Muire Member of the Clann Sinaig.
d. 1064 Dub dá Leithe III Máel Muire Member of the Clann Sinaig; also fer léigind (i.e., Lector) since 1046.
d. 1074 Cummascach Ua hErodáin In opposition to Dub dá Leithe III.
d. 1091 Máel Ísu mac Amalgada Member of the Clann Sinaig; died 18 December 1091.
d. 1105 Domnall mac Amalgada Member of the Clann Sinaig; died August 1105.
d. 1129 Cellach of Armagh
(Saint Cellach; Irish: Cellach mac Áeda meic Máel Ísu)
Member of the Clann Sinaig; consecrated bishop of Armagh on 23 September 1105 and elevated to archbishop in 1106; died 1 April 1129; also known as Saint Ceallach and Celsus.
1129 to 1134 Muirchertach mac Domnall Member of the Clann Sinaig; died 17 September 1134; also known as Maurice MacDonald, and Murrough.
resigned 1137 Niall mac Áeda meic Máel Ísu Member of the Clann Sinaig; died 1139.
Source(s):[6][8]

Bishops of Armagh

Later bishops of Armagh
Tenure Ordinary Notes.
d. 794 Affiath Died on the same night as Abbot Airechtach (see above).
d. 812 Saint Nuadu of Loch Uama Also abbot of Armagh and anchorite.
d. 833 Artrí mac Conchobair Bishop of Armagh since 794; acted as abbot and Coarb (or possibly on behalf of Flandgus) in 818, 823, 825; died 833.
d. 852 Forindán mac Murgile Also abbot of Armagh.
d. 863 Máel Pátraic mac Findchon
d. 874 Féthgno mac Nechtain Also abbot of Armagh.
d. 883 Cathassach mac Robartaig Also abbot of Armagh.
d. 893 Mochtae daltae Féthgno Also scribe and anchorite.
d. 895 Máel Aithgin
d. 903 Cellach mac Sóergussa Also anchorite.
d. 915 Máel Ciaráin mac Eochocáin
d. 936 Ioseph mac Fathaig Also abbot of Armagh and anchorite; also known as Joseph.
d. 936 Máel Pátraic mac Máel Tuile Also abbot of Armagh.
d. 957 Cathassach mac Doilgén Also abbot of Armagh.
d. 967 Cathassach mac Murchadáin
d. 994 Máel Muire mac Scandláinn
d. 1006 Airmedach mac Coscraig
d. 1012 (? Cenn Fáelad Sabaill) Anchorite; said to be a 'pilgrim', and probably was not bishop of Armagh.
d. 1032 Máel Tuile
d. 1056 Áed Ua Forréid May have resigned the bishopric when he became fer léigind (i.e., Lector) in 1049.
d. 1096 Máel Pátraic mac Airmedaig
d. 1106 Cáenchomrac Ua Baigill Consecrated 29 May 1099.
After the see was elevated to an archbishopric in 1106, the Annals of Ulster record three more bishops of Armagh, but they probably ruled the see of Cinél nEógain (Ardstraw/Maghera), which later became the see of Derry.
1107 to 1122 Máel Coluim Ua Broicháin Styled bishop of Ard Macha; probably combined duties as bishop under the old regime with diocesan care over the see of Cinél nEógain; consecrated 13 September 1107; died at Derry in 1122.
d. 1139 Máel Brigte Ua Broicháin Styled bishop of Ard Macha; probably combined duties as bishop under the old regime with diocesan care over the see of Cinél nEógain; died 29 January 1139.
d. 1186 Amlaim Ua Muirethaig Styled "bishop of Ard-Macha and Cenel-Feradhaigh"; appears to be reckoned as Coarb of St Patrick in the Book of Leinster; probably ruled the see of Cinél nEógain; died at Cenél Feradaig Cruthnai, County Londonderry in 1185; buried in Derry
Source(s):[6][9]

Pre-Reformation archbishops

Pre-Reformation Archbishops of Armagh
From Until Ordinary Notes.
1105 1129 Cellach of Armagh
Saint Cellach; Irish: Cellach mac Áeda meic Máel Ísu
Abbot of Armagh; consecrated bishop on 23 September 1105; elevated to archbishop in 1106; died 1 April 1129; also known as Saint Ceallach, and Celsus.
1129 1132/34 See vacant.
1132/34 1136/37 Saint Malachy
Irish: Máel Máedóc Ua Morgair
Became bishop of Down and Connor in 1124; elected and consecrated Archbishop of Armagh in 1132, but was not installed until 1134; resigned the sees of Armagh and Connor in 1136 or 1137, but retained Down until his death on 2 November 1148; canonized by Pope Clement III on 6 July 1199; also known as Malachy O'Morgair, Malachy O' More, and Malachias.
1137 1174 Gilla Meic Liac mac Diarmata Elected and consecrated 1137; died 27 March 1174; also known as Gelasius.
1174 1175 Cornelius of Armagh
Irish: Conchobar mac Meic Con Caille
Elected and consecrated c. 1174; died 1175; also known as St Concors and Cornelius MacConcaille.
1175 1180 Gilla in Choimded Ua Caráin Translated from Raphoe; elected and consecrated c. 1175; died c. January 1180; also known as Gillebertus, and Gilbert O'Caran.
1180 1184 Tommaltach Ua Conchobair
Irish: Tommaltach mac Áeda Ua Conchobair
Elected and consecrated before February 1180; resigned in 1184; also known as Thomas O'Conor.
1184 1186/87 Mael Ísu Ua Cerbaill Elected Bishop of Clogher in 1178 and Archbishop of Armagh in 1184; held both sees until his death c. 1186 or 1187; also known as Malachias, and Maelisu O'Carroll.
1186/87 1201 Tommaltach Ua Conchobair (again)
Irish: Tommaltach mac Áeda Ua Conchobair
Restored c. 1186 or 1187; died 1201.
1206 1216 Echdonn Mac Gilla Uidir Elected and consecrated 1202; acted as a suffragan bishop in the dioceses of Exeter and Worcester 1207; died after 11 August 1216; also known as Eugene MacGillaweer.
1217 1227 Luke Netterville Elected before August 1217; confirmed in 1220; died 17 April 1227.
1227 1237 Donatus Ó Fidabra Translated from Clogher c. August 1227; died before 17 October 1237; also known as Donat Fury, and Donat O'Feery.
1238 (Robert Archer OP) Elected before 4 April 1238, but never consecrated.
1239 1246 Albert Suerbeer OP Appointed before March 1239; consecrated 30 September 1240; translated to Prussia-Livonia 10 January 1246; also known as Alberic the German.
1247 1256 Reginald of Bologna OP Appointed and consecrated before 28 October 1247; died July 1256.
1257 1260 Abraham Ó Conalláin Elected after 20 February 1257; consecrated before 16 March 1258; died 21 December 1260; also known as Abraham O'Connellan.
1261 1270 Máel Patraic Ua Scannail OP
(Anglicised: Patrick O'Scanlan)
Elected c. March and confirmed before 13 August 1261; translated from Raphoe 5 November 1261; died 16 March 1270; also known as Patrick O'Scanlan.
1270 1303 Nicol Mac Máel Ísu Elected after 9 May and confirmed 14 July 1270; died 10 May 1303; also known as Nicholas MacMaelisu.
1303 (Michael MacLochlainn OFM) Elected before 31 August 1303, but never consecrated; later elected Bishop of Derry in 1319.
1303/04 c.1304 (Dionysius) Appointed in 1303 or 1304, but was never consecrated; resigned c. 1304.
1306 1307 John Taaffe Appointed 27 August 1306; died before 6 August 1307.
1307 1311 Walter Jorz OP Appointed and consecrated 6 August 1307; resigned before 13 November 1311; also known as Walter Joyce.
1311 1322 Roland Jorz OP Appointed and consecrated 13 November 1311; resigned before 22 August 1322; acted as a suffragan bishop in the dioceses of Canterbury in 1323, and York in 1332; also known as Roland Joyce.
1323 1333 Stephen Seagrave (alias de Segrave[10]) Appointed 16 March 1323 and consecrated in April 1324; died 27 October 1333.
1334 1346 David Mág Oireachtaigh Elected before 4 July 1334 and appointed on that date; consecrated before 26 July 1334; died 16 May 1346; also known in Irish as David Mageraghty.
1346 1360 Richard FitzRalph Elected before 31 July 1346 and appointed on that date; consecrated 8 July 1347; died 16 November 1360.
1361 1380 Milo Sweetman Appointed 29 October 1361; consecrated between 17 and 21 November 1361; died 11 August 1380.
1381 (Thomas Ó Calmáin OFM) Appointed on 14 January 1381 by Avignon Pope Clement VII.
1381 1404 John Colton Appointed after January 1381; consecrated in 1381; resigned before April 1404; died 27 April 1404.
1404 1416 Nicholas Fleming Appointed 18 April and consecrated 1 May 1404; appointed (again) 11 November 1404; died after 22 June 1416.
1416 1418 See vacant During this period, Richard Talbot was elected archbishop of Armagh in 1416, but failed to secure confirmation in time. Later became Archbishop of Dublin in 1417.
1418 1439 John Swayne Appointed 10 January and consecrated c. 2 February 1418; resigned 27 March 1439; died before October 1442.
1439 1443 John Prene Appointed 27 March and consecrated in November 1439; died in June 1443.
1443 1456 John Mey Appointed 26 August 1443 and consecrated 20 June 1444; died in 1456.
1457 1471 John Bole OSA Appointed 2 May and consecrated before 13 June 1457; died 18 February 1471; also known as John Bull.
1471 1474 John Foxalls OFM Appointed 16 December 1471 and consecrated later in the same month; died before 23 November 1474; also known as John Foxholes.
1475 1477 Edmund Connesburgh Appointed 5 June 1475 and consecrated c. 1475, however, did not get possession of the see; resigned November 1477; became titular Archbishop of Chalcedon in 1478; in March 1483 he was styled "Archbishop in the universal church"; he acted as a suffragan bishop in the dioceses of Ely in 1477, and Exeter in 1502.
1478 1513 Ottaviano Spinelli de Palatio DCL Appointed 3 July 1478 and consecrated before January 1480; died in June 1513.
1513 1521 John Kite Appointed 24 October 1513 and consecrated after that date; translated to Carlisle 12 July 1521.
Source(s):[11][12][13]

Archbishops during the Reformation

Archbishops of Armagh during the Reformation
From Until Ordinary Notes.
1521 1543 George Cromer [contested] Appointed by the papacy on 2 October 1521 and consecrated in December 1521 or April 1522. After initially denouncing Henry VIII's decrees against the Roman Catholic Church, Cromer submitted to Royal supremacy. Suspended by the papacy on 23 July 1539, but that suspension was not recognised by the king, and Cromer continued in office until he died on 16 March 1543.
1539 1551 Robert Wauchope [contested] Appointed by the papacy to administer the see on 23 July 1539, but was not recognised by the king. After Cromer's death, Wauchope was consecrated c. 1543 and granted the pallium on 23 March 1545, but was unable to take control of the see. Died in exile in Paris on 15 August 1551.
1543 1551 George Dowdall (1st term) Nominated by King Henry VIII on 19 April 1543 and consecrated December 1543. Deemed to have abandoned the See before 28 July 1551.
1552 1553 Hugh Goodacre Nominated by King Edward VI on 28 October 1552 and consecrated on 2 February 1553. Died on 1 May 1553.
1553 1558 George Dowdall (2nd term) Appointed by the papacy on 1 March 1553 and granted the temporalities by Queen Mary I on 23 October 1553. Died on 15 August 1558.
Source(s):[6][14][15][16]

Post-Reformation archbishops

Church of Ireland succession

Church of Ireland Archbishops of Armagh
From Until Ordinary Notes.
1558 1562 See vacant.
1562 1567
Archbishop Loftus.jpg
Adam Loftus
Nominated 30 October 1562; consecrated 2 March 1563; Translated to Dublin 9 August 1567; died 5 April 1605.
1568 1584
No image.svg
Thomas Lancaster
Formerly Bishop of Kildare (1550–1555); nominated 12 March 1568; consecrated 13 June 1568; died 1584.
1584 1589
No image.svg
John Longe
Nominated 7 July 1584; consecrated 13 July 1584; died before 16 January 1589.
1589 1595
No image.svg
John Garvey
Translated from Kilmore; nominated 24 March 1589; by letters patent 10 May 1589; died 2 March 1595.
1595 1613
Henry Ussher.jpg
Henry Ussher
Nominated 24 May 1595; consecrated August 1595; also Archdeacon of Dublin 1580–1613; died 2 April 1613.
1613 1625
Christopher Hampton.jpg
Christopher Hampton
Nominated 16 April 1613; consecrated 8 May 1613; died 3 January 1625.
1625 1656
James Ussher by Sir Peter Lely.jpg
James Ussher
Translated from Meath; nominated 29 January 1625; by letters patent 21 March 1625; also Bishop of Carlisle 1641–1656; died 21 March 1656.
1656 1661 See vacant.
1661 1663
Abp John Bramhall.jpg
John Bramhall
Translated from Derry; nominated 1 August 1660; letters patent 18 January 1661; died 25 June 1663.
1663 1678
No image.svg
James Margetson
Translated from Dublin; nominated 25 July 1663, by letters patent 20 August 1663; died 28 August 1678.
1679 1702
Abp Michael Boyle.jpg
Michael Boyle
Translated from Dublin; nominated 21 January 1679; by letters patent 27 February 1679; died 10 December 1702.
1703 1713
Abp Narcissus Marsh.png
Narcissus Marsh
Translated from Dublin; nominated 26 January 1703; by letters patent 18 February 1703; died 2 November 1713.
1713 1724
No image.svg
Thomas Lindsay
Translated from Raphoe; nominated 22 December 1713; by letters patent 4 January 1714; died 13 July 1724.
1724 1742
Bp Hugh Boulter.jpg
Hugh Boulter
Translated from Bristol; nominated 12 August 1724; by letters patent 31 August 1724; died 27 September 1742.
1742 1746
Abp John Hoadly.jpg
John Hoadly
Translated from Dublin; nominated 6 October 1742; by letters patent 21 October 1742; died 16 July 1746.
1747 1764
Abp George Stone.jpg
George Stone
Translated from Derry; nominated 28 February 1747; by letters patent 13 March 1747; died 19 December 1764.
1765 1794
Richard Lord Rokeby by Joshua Reynolds.jpg
Richard Robinson
The Lord Rokeby from 1777. Translated from Kildare; nominated 8 January 1765; by letters patent 8 February 1765;[17] died 10 October 1794.
1795 1800
Abp William Newcome.jpg
William Newcome
Translated from Waterford and Lismore; nominated 16 January 1795; by letters patent 27 January 1795; died 11 January 1800.
1800 1822
Abp Hon William Stuart.jpg
The Hon William Stuart
Translated from St David's; nominated 30 October 1800; by letters patent 22 November 1800; died 6 May 1822.
1822 1862
Lord JGdP Beresford Abp Armagh.jpg
Lord John Beresford
Translated from Dublin; nominated and by letters patent 17 June 1822; died 18 July 1862; first-cousin-once-removed to Marcus.
1862 1885
Abp Marcus Gervais Beresford.jpg
Marcus Beresford
Translated from Kilmore, Elphin and Ardagh; by letters patent 15 October 1862; died 26 December 1885; first-cousin-once-removed to John.
1886 1893
Abp Robert Bent Knox.jpg
Robert Knox
Translated from Down, Connor and Dromore; elected 11 May 1886; died 23 October 1893.
1893 1896
Abp Robert Samuel Gregg.jpg
Robert Gregg
Translated from Cork, Cloyne and Ross; elected 14 December 1893; died 10 January 1896.
1896 1911
Abp William Alexander.jpg
William Alexander
Translated from Derry and Raphoe; elected 25 February 1896; resigned 1 February 1911; died 12 September 1911.
1911 1920
John Baptist Crozier.jpg
John Crozier
Translated from Down, Connor and Dromore; elected 2 February 1911; died 11 April 1920.
1920 1938
CF D'Arcy by John Lavery.jpg
Charles D'Arcy
Translated from Dublin; elected 17 June 1920; died 1 February 1938.
1938 1938
No image.svg
Godfrey Day
Translated from Ossory, Ferns and Leighlin; 27 April 1938; died 26 September 1938.
1939 1959
Dr. R. Miller and John Gregg Archbishop of Dublin. (22571712226) (cropped).jpg
John Gregg
Translated from Dublin; elected 15 December 1938; accepted 1 January 1939; resigned 18 February 1959; died 1961.
1959 1969
No image.svg
James McCann
Translated from Meath; elected 19 February 1959; resigned 16 July 1969.
1969 1980
No image.svg
George Simms
Translated from Dublin; elected 17 July 1969; resigned 11 February 1980; died 1991.
1980 1986
No image.svg
John Armstrong
Translated from Cashel and Ossory; elected 25 February 1980; resigned 1986; died 1987.
1986 2006
Lord Eames.jpg
Robin Eames
Translated from Down and Dromore; retired; created Baron Eames on 25 August 1995.[18]
2007 2012
Bishop Alan Harper.jpg
Alan Harper[19]
Translated from Connor; elected 9 January 2007; enthroned 16 March 2007; retired 1 October 2012.[19]
2012 2020
The Prince of Wales at St Patrick's Cathedral, Armagh with archbishops (47950084462) (Richard Clarke cropped).jpg
Richard Clarke
Translated from Meath and Kildare; elected 3 October 2012; enthroned 12 December 2012; retired 2 February 2020.[20]
2020 present
Most Rev John Mcdowell.png
John McDowell
Translated from Clogher; elected 18 March 2020.
Source(s):[6][21][22][23][24]

Roman Catholic succession

Roman Catholic Archbishops of Armagh
From Until Ordinary Notes.
1558 1560 See vacant.
1560 1562
No image.svg
Donagh O'Tighe
Appointed 7 February 1560; consecrated February 1560; died 1562; also known as Donat O'Teige.
1562 1564 See vacant.
1564 1585
No image.svg
Richard Creagh
Appointed 22 March 1564; consecrated Easter 1564; died as a prisoner in the Tower of London in January 1585.
1585 1587 See vacant.
1587 1593
No image.svg
Edmund MacGauran
Translated from Ardagh; appointed 1 July 1587; died 23 June 1593.
1593 1601 See vacant.
1601 1625
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Peter Lombard
Appointed 9 July 1601; he never came to Ireland, but remained in Rome; died 1625.
1626
Aodh McAingil MacCathmhaoil (cropped).png
Aodh Mac Cathmhaoil OFM
(Anglicised: Hugh MacCaghwell)
Appointed 27 April 1626; consecrated 7 June 1626; died 22 September 1626.
1626 1628 See vacant.
1628 1653
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Hugh O'Reilly
Translated from Kilmore; appointed by three consistorial acts: dated 5 May, 31 July, and 31 August 1628; died in February 1653.
1653 1658 See vacant.
1658 1669
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Edmund O'Reilly
Appointed 16 April 1658; consecrated 26 May 1658; died 8 March 1669.
1669 1681
Saint Oliver Plunkett.jpg
Saint Oliver Plunkett
Appointed 9 July 1669; papal brief 3 August 1669; consecrated 1 December 1669; executed 1 July 1681; canonized 12 October 1975.
1681 unknown
No image.svg
(Edward Drumgoole, vicar apostolic)
Appointed vicar apostolic by papal brief on 19 December 1681.
1683 1707
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Dominic Maguire OP
Appointed 14 December 1683; papal brief 12 January 1684; died 21 September 1707.
1707 1715 See vacant.
1715 1737
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Hugh MacMahon
Translated from Clogher; appointed 6 August 1715; papal brief 9 July 1715; also was apostolic administrator of Dromore 1731–37; died 2 August 1737.
1737 1747
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Bernard MacMahon
Translated from Clogher; appointed 8 November 1737; also was apostolic administrator of Dromore 1737–47; died 27 May 1747.
1747 1748
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Ross MacMahon
Translated from Clogher 3 August 1747; died 29 October 1748.
1749 1758
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Michael O'Reilly
Translated from Derry; appointed 23 January 1749; died 1758.
1758 1787
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Anthony Blake
Translated from Ardagh and Clonmacnoise; appointed 21 August 1758; died 11 November 1787.
1787 1818
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Richard O'Reilly
Appointed coadjutor archbishop 26 February 1782; succeeded 11 November 1787; died 31 January 1818.
1819 1832
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Patrick Curtis
Appointed 8 August 1819; consecrated 28 October 1819; died 26 July 1832.
1832 1835
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Thomas Kelly
Translated from Dromore; appointed coadjutor archbishop 1 December 1828; succeeded 26 July 1832; died 13 January 1835.
1835 1849
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William Crolly
Translated from Down and Connor; appointed 12 April 1835; died 6 April 1849.
1849 1852
Paul Cullen archbishop of Dublin (cropped).jpg
Paul Cullen
Appointed 19 December 1849; consecrated 24 February 1850; translated to Dublin 1 May 1852, where he subsequently became the first Irish cardinal on 22 June 1866.
1852 1866
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Joseph Dixon
Appointed 4 October 1852; consecrated 21 November 1852; died 29 April 1866.
1866 1869
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Michael Kieran
Appointed 6 November 1866; consecrated 3 February 1867; died 15 September 1869.
1870 1887
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Daniel McGettigan
Translated from Raphoe; appointed 11 March 1870; died 3 December 1887.
1887 1924
Michael Cardinal Logue.jpg
Cardinal Michael Logue
Translated from Raphoe; appointed coadjutor archbishop 30 April 1887; succeeded 3 December 1887; created cardinal 19 January 1893; died 19 November 1924.
1924 1927
Cardinal OD.jpg
Cardinal Patrick O'Donnell
Translated from Raphoe; appointed coadjutor archbishop 14 February 1922; succeeded 19 November 1924; created cardinal 14 December 1925; died 22 October 1927.
1928 1945
Cardinal MacRory.JPG
Cardinal Joseph MacRory
Translated from Down and Connor; appointed 22 June 1928; created cardinal 16 December 1929; died 13 October 1945.
1946 1963
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Cardinal John D'Alton
Translated from Meath; appointed 25 April 1946; created cardinal 12 January 1953; died 1 February 1963.
1963 1977
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Cardinal William Conway
Formerly an auxiliary bishop of Armagh 1958–1963; appointed archbishop 9 September 1963; created cardinal 22 February 1965; died 17 April 1977.
1977 1990
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Cardinal Tomás Ó Fiaich
Appointed 22 August 1977; consecrated 2 October 1977; created cardinal 30 June 1979; died 8 May 1990.
1990 1996
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Cardinal Cahal Daly
Translated from Down and Connor; appointed 6 November 1990; created cardinal 28 June 1991; retired 1 October 1996; died 31 December 2009.
1996 2014
Michael Paul Gallagher and Cardinal Sean Brady (cropped).jpg
Cardinal Seán Brady
Appointed coadjutor archbishop 13 December 1994 and consecrated 19 February 1995; succeeded as archbishop 1 October and installed 3 November 1996; created cardinal 24 November 2007 and resignation as archbishop accepted 8 September 2014
2014 present
The Prince of Wales at St Patrick's Cathedral, Armagh with archbishops (47950084462) (Eamon Martin cropped).jpg
Eamon Martin
Appointed coadjutor archbishop 18 January 2013 and consecrated 21 April 2013; succeeded as archbishop 8 September 2014
Source(s):[25][26][27]

See also

Notes

  1. ^ "Archbishop of Armagh". Diocese of Armagh. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  2. ^ McDowell, John. "A message from Archbishop John McDowell". Church of Ireland. Retrieved 28 April 2020.
  3. ^ "Welcome Archbishop John".
  4. ^ "Archbishop Eamon Martin". armagharchdiocese.org. Archived from the original on 22 January 2014. Retrieved 24 February 2014.
  5. ^ St. Sechnall. Catholic Encyclopedia. Retrieved 29 January 2010.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Past Archbishops". Saint Patrick's Church of Ireland Cathedral in Armagh. Retrieved 3 May 2011.
  7. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, p. 238.
  8. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 238–239.
  9. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 239–240.
  10. ^ Similar notarial instrument: renunciation by Stephen de Segrave, archbishop of Armagh - National Archives
  11. ^ Cotton 1849, The Province of Ulster, pp. 9–18.
  12. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, pp. 334–336.
  13. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 239 and 268–271.
  14. ^ Cotton 1849, The Province of Ulster, p. 18.
  15. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, pp. 336, 379, and 415.
  16. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 271, 337, and 393.
  17. ^ Peerages: Robson of Kiddington to Rosse[Usurped!]. Leigh Rayment. Retrieved 23 January 2009.
  18. ^ Peerages: Eames to Emly[Usurped!]. Leigh Rayment's Peerage Page. Retrieved 23 January 2009.
  19. ^ a b Diocese of Armagh: Alan Harper. Retrieved 23 January 2009.
  20. ^ Press Release 2 November 2019, Archbishop Clarke to retire.
  21. ^ Cotton 1849, The Province of Ulster, pp. 18–29.
  22. ^ Cotton & Cotton 1878, Supplement, p. 86.
  23. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, pp. 379–380.
  24. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 393–395.
  25. ^ "Archdiocese of Armagh". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved 4 December 2013.
  26. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, Handbook of British Chronology, pp. 415–416.
  27. ^ Moody, Martin & Byrne 1984, A New History of Ireland, volume IX, pp. 337–339.

References

  • Cotton, Henry (1849). The Province of Ulster. Fasti Ecclesiae Hiberniae: The Succession of the Prelates and Members of the Cathedral Bodies of Ireland. Vol. 3. Dublin: Hodges and Smith.
  • Cotton, Henry; Cotton, Charles Philip (1878). Supplement. Fasti Ecclesiae Hiberniae: The Succession of the Prelates and Members of the Cathedral Bodies of Ireland. Vol. 6. Dublin: James Charles & Son.
  • Fryde, E. B.; Greenway, D. E.; Porter, S.; Roy, I., eds. (1986). Handbook of British Chronology (3rd, reprinted 2003 ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. ISBN 0-521-56350-X.
  • Moody, T. W.; Martin, F. X.; Byrne, F. J., eds. (1984). Maps, Genealogies, Lists: A Companion to Irish History, Part II. A New History of Ireland. Vol. IX. Oxford: Oxford University Press. ISBN 0-19-821745-5.
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