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From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Aquiminzaque
zaque
AQUIMINZAQUE.jpg
Aquiminzaque, the last ruler of Hunza
Reign1537–1540
PredecessorQuemuenchatocha
SuccessorPosition abolished
Bornunknown
Muisca Confederation
Died1540
Hunza,
New Kingdom of Granada
ChibchaAquim ó Quiminza
DynastyHunza

Aquiminzaque (Chibcha: Aquim ó Quiminza, died Hunza, 1540) was the last zaque of Hunza, currently known as Tunja, as of 1537. His zipa counterpart in the southern area of the Muisca was Sagipa. Aquiminzaque was for the Muisca what Túpac Amaru was for the Inca; and as the Inca leader, Aquiminzaque was executed by decapitation.

Biography

Aquiminzaque was the nephew of his predecessor, Quemuenchatocha, which reign he followed when on August 2, 1537 Quemenchatocha was taken prisoner to Suesca by the Spanish.[1][2]

Aquiminzaque was ruling over the northern area of the Muisca in present-day Boyacá, Colombia in the years when the Spanish conquistadores were entering the highlands of the Muisca.

At first Aquiminzaque converted to catholicism but when he realized the true motives of the Spanish conquerors over the Muisca people he revolted against them and undermined the initial rule of Hernán Pérez de Quesada, brother of Gonzalo Jiménez de Quesada. Shortly after, in 1540, Hernán executed Aquiminzaque by public decapitation in Tunja.[3] The spectacle, meant as an example, was watched by the Muisca people and executions of other caciques of Toca, Motavita, Samacá, Turmequé and Sutamarchán followed.

The death of the last zaque meant the end of the Muisca Confederation.

Legacy

In Tunja, capital of the Boyacá department, a statue honouring Aquiminzaque (Monumento a la Raza Indígena) has been erected.[4]

Aquiminzaque in Muisca history

History of the Muisca
Sutagao peopleGuayupe peopleTegua peoplePanche peopleMuisca peopleAchagua peopleMuzo peopleGuane peopleU'wa peopleLache peopleBattle of TocaremaBattle of ChocontáBattle of PascaSagipaTisquesusaNemequeneSaguamanchicaMeicuchucaHistory of Bogotá#Pre-Columbian eraNencatacoaHuitaca (goddess)ChaquénCuchaviraChibchacumBochicaChía (goddess)SuéChiminigaguaSpanish conquest of the MuiscaAquiminzaqueQuemuenchatochaMichuáHunzahúaTunja#HistoryThomagataThomagataPacanchiqueGoranchachaMonster of Lake TotaEl DoradoSugamuxiNompanimIdacansásiracaTundamaDuitama#HistorySpanish EmpireMuisca Confederation

Altiplano

Muisca

Art

Architecture

Astronomy

Cuisine

El Dorado

Subsistence

Women

Conquest


See also

References

External links

This page was last edited on 25 May 2019, at 01:27
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