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Amelia County, Virginia

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Amelia County
Amelia County Court House
Amelia County Court House
Official seal of Amelia County
Map of Virginia highlighting Amelia County
Location within the U.S. state of Virginia
Map of the United States highlighting Virginia
Virginia's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 37°20′N 77°59′W / 37.34°N 77.98°W / 37.34; -77.98
Country United States
State Virginia
Founded1735
Named forPrincess Amelia
SeatAmelia Court House
Area
 • Total359 sq mi (930 km2)
 • Land355 sq mi (920 km2)
 • Water3.3 sq mi (9 km2)  0.9%
Population
 (2020)
 • Total13,265
 • Density37/sq mi (14/km2)
Demonym(s)Amelian, Amellianaire
Time zoneUTC−5 (Eastern)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−4 (EDT)
ZIP Codes
23002, 23083, 23105
Congressional district7th
Websiteva-ameliacounty.civicplus.com

Amelia County is a county located just southwest of Richmond in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States. The county is located in Central Virginia and is included in the Greater Richmond Region. Its county seat is Amelia Court House.[1]

Amelia County was created in 1735 from parts of Prince George and Brunswick counties, and was named in honor of Princess Amelia of Great Britain. Parts of the county were later carved out to create Prince Edward and Nottoway counties.

As of the 2020 census, the county population was 13,265.[2]

History

Princess Amelia of Great Britain, for whom the county is named
Princess Amelia of Great Britain, for whom the county is named

Amelia County was created by legislative act in 1734 and 1735[3] from parts of Prince George and Brunswick counties. The county is named for Princess Amelia of Great Britain, daughter of King George II. As was customary, Amelia County was reduced by the division of territory to form newer counties as the population increased in the region; in 1754, Prince Edward County was formed from parts of Amelia County, and in 1789, Nottoway County was formed. The area was developed for plantation agriculture dependent on slave labor.

During the Civil War, Confederate general Robert E. Lee and his army spent April 4 and 5, 1865, at Amelia Court House before his surrender on April 9 to General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox. The last major battle of his army was fought at Sayler's Creek, on the border of Amelia and Prince Edward counties, on April 6.

Amelia is known for its minerals, including the nation's best supply of amazonite, a green feldspar found at the Morefield mine. In the 19th century, spas were developed around its mineral springs, which were destinations for travelers.

In 1986 the Amelia County Fair sponsored a competition for the world's largest potato pancake (with apple sauce). It was constructed to raise money that year for the German American National Scholarship Fund. The pancake weighed more than two and one-quarter tons and used four truckloads of potatoes.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 359 square miles (930 km2), of which 355 square miles (920 km2) is land and 3.3 square miles (8.5 km2) (0.9%) is water.[4]

Amelia County lies in the Piedmont region of Virginia, known for rolling hills and small ridges that lie between the Blue Ridge Mountains and Coastal Plain of Virginia. The county is bordered by the Appomattox River to the north and west, and Namozine Creek to the east.

Amelia County is drained by tributaries of the Appomattox. The lowest elevation in the county is 158 feet (48 m), on Lake Chesdin on the Appomattox at the eastern extremity of the county. The highest elevation is 525 feet (160 m), on SR 616 (S. Genito Road) at the community of Gills in the southwest corner of the county.[5]

Adjacent counties

Transportation

Air

US Highways

State Routes

  • SR 38 (In Amelia Court House: Virginia Street, Court Street, Washington Street, Church Street, Five Forks Road. In Amelia County: N. Five Forks Road, to SR 153.)
  • SR 153 (Military Road. To US 460 and Blackstone.)
  • SR 307 (Holly Farms Road. To US 460 and Farmville.)

Secondary Routes

Rail

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
179018,097
18009,432−47.9%
181010,59412.3%
182011,1044.8%
183011,036−0.6%
184010,320−6.5%
18509,770−5.3%
186010,7419.9%
18709,878−8.0%
188010,3775.1%
18909,068−12.6%
19009,037−0.3%
19108,720−3.5%
19209,80012.4%
19308,799−10.2%
19408,495−3.5%
19507,908−6.9%
19607,815−1.2%
19707,592−2.9%
19808,40510.7%
19908,7874.5%
200011,40029.7%
201012,69011.3%
202013,2654.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[6]
1790-1960[7] 1900-1990[8]
1990-2000[9] 2010[10] 2020[11]

2020 census

Amelia County, Virginia - Demographic Profile
(NH = Non-Hispanic)
Race / Ethnicity Pop 2010[10] Pop 2020[11] % 2010 % 2020
White alone (NH) 9,233 9,687 72.76% 73.03%
Black or African American alone (NH) 2,925 2,546 23.05% 19.19%
Native American or Alaska Native alone (NH) 39 18 0.31% 0.14%
Asian alone (NH) 27 63 0.21% 0.47%
Pacific Islander alone (NH) 0 0 0.00% 0.00%
Some Other Race alone (NH) 10 50 0.08% 0.38%
Mixed Race/Multi-Racial (NH) 166 476 1.31% 3.59%
Hispanic or Latino (any race) 290 425 2.29% 3.20%
Total 12,690 13,265 100.00% 100.00%

Note: the US Census treats Hispanic/Latino as an ethnic category. This table excludes Latinos from the racial categories and assigns them to a separate category. Hispanics/Latinos can be of any race.


2000 Census

As of the census[12] of 2000, there were 11,400 people, 4,240 households, and 3,175 families residing in the county. The population density was 32 people per square mile (12/km2). There were 4,609 housing units, at an average density of 13 per square mile (5/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 70.57% White, 28.05% Black or African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.17% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.25% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. 0.80% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,240 households, of which 32.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.10% were married couples living together, 11.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.10% were non-families. 20.70% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.07.

The median age was 38 years, with 25.30% under 18, 6.70% from 18 to 24, 29.20% from 25 to 44, 25.40% from 45 to 64, and 13.30% who were 65 years of age or older. For every 100 females, there were 97.30 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.20 males.

The median household income was $40,252, and the median family income was $47,157. Males had a median income of $32,315, versus $23,102 for females. The per capita income for the county was $18,858. 8.40% of the population and 6.70% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 7.10% were under the age of 18 and 11.70% were 65 or older.

Culture

Seasonal Events

  • A countywide festival called Amelia Day is held each May on the Saturday before Mother's Day in Amelia Court House. The festival started in the 1980s to celebrate the town's founding. Vendors, local clubs, and citizens organize to enjoy music, dancing, and socializing. At the first Amelia Day in 1985, residents signed a long roll that, along with other items, was put in a time capsule and buried in the courthouse green near the Confederate War Memorial. The capsule is scheduled to be opened in 2035.
  • The Amelia County Fair is held in late summer or early fall each year at the Joe Paulette Memorial Park in Amelia Court House.[13]
  • Each October, the Amelia Frightfest, a trail haunt, opens at Tom Scott Park in Amelia Court House.
  • Every year from April to October, on the second Saturday of every month, The Time Bandits car club hosts a car show at the Truist Bank parking lot on Patrick Henry Highway.[14]

Attractions

Government

Board of Supervisors

  • District 1: David M. Felts Jr. (Chairman)
  • District 2: Dexter Jones
  • District 3: Shaun Weyant, Vice Chairman (I)
  • District 4: H. Joseph Easter IV, Chairman (I)
  • District 5: Todd Robinson

Constitutional officers

  • Clerk of the Circuit Court: Marilyn L. Wilson (D)
  • Commissioner of the Revenue: Laura Walsh (I)
  • Commonwealth's Attorney: Lee R. Harrison (I)
  • Sheriff: Rick Walker (I)
  • Treasurer: Stephanie Coleman (I)

Amelia County is represented by Republican Amanda Chase in the Virginia Senate, Republican Thomas C. Wright Jr. in the Virginia House of Delegates, and Democrat Abigail Spanberger in the U.S. House of Representatives.

United States presidential election results for Amelia County, Virginia[15]
Year Republican Democratic Third party
No.  % No.  % No.  %
2020 5,390 68.29% 2,411 30.55% 92 1.17%
2016 4,708 66.88% 2,128 30.23% 204 2.90%
2012 4,331 62.63% 2,490 36.01% 94 1.36%
2008 3,970 60.81% 2,488 38.11% 71 1.09%
2004 3,499 64.83% 1,862 34.50% 36 0.67%
2000 2,947 61.55% 1,754 36.63% 87 1.82%
1996 2,119 51.13% 1,625 39.21% 400 9.65%
1992 2,062 48.82% 1,534 36.32% 628 14.87%
1988 2,187 60.85% 1,359 37.81% 48 1.34%
1984 2,336 61.41% 1,432 37.64% 36 0.95%
1980 1,969 53.20% 1,643 44.39% 89 2.40%
1976 1,634 47.25% 1,715 49.60% 109 3.15%
1972 1,606 64.99% 778 31.49% 87 3.52%
1968 857 33.90% 830 32.83% 841 33.27%
1964 1,348 60.21% 884 39.48% 7 0.31%
1960 784 51.44% 708 46.46% 32 2.10%
1956 745 43.11% 403 23.32% 580 33.56%
1952 832 53.64% 703 45.33% 16 1.03%
1948 372 35.16% 443 41.87% 243 22.97%
1944 295 34.67% 553 64.98% 3 0.35%
1940 267 32.13% 562 67.63% 2 0.24%
1936 239 23.97% 753 75.53% 5 0.50%
1932 142 16.63% 701 82.08% 11 1.29%
1928 277 35.74% 498 64.26% 0 0.00%
1924 153 28.33% 372 68.89% 15 2.78%
1920 179 31.18% 389 67.77% 6 1.05%
1916 80 16.39% 403 82.58% 5 1.02%
1912 32 7.82% 325 79.46% 52 12.71%


Media

The Amelia Bulletin Monitor, a weekly newspaper, has covered the county since 1973.

Education

Public Primary and secondary schools

Amelia County is served by the Amelia County School District.

Private Primary and secondary Schools

Communities

There are no incorporated communities in Amelia County.

Census-designated places

Unincorporated communities

Historic sites

The following sites in Amelia County are listed on the National Register of Historic Places:

Notable residents

References

  1. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011.
  2. ^ "Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved January 30, 2022.
  3. ^ History of Amelia County Archived 2010-12-05 at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. February 12, 2011. Retrieved April 23, 2011.
  5. ^ "Geographic Names Information System".
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing from 1790-2000". US Census Bureau. Retrieved January 24, 2022.
  7. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  8. ^ "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  9. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Retrieved December 31, 2013.
  10. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2010: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  11. ^ a b "P2 HISPANIC OR LATINO, AND NOT HISPANIC OR LATINO BY RACE - 2020: DEC Redistricting Data (PL 94-171) - Amelia County, Virginia". United States Census Bureau.
  12. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  13. ^ Amelia County Fair. Retrieved July 18, 2021.
  14. ^ "Cruise-In hosted by the Time Bandits Car Club on April 10, 2021".
  15. ^ David Leip. "Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections". Uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved December 9, 2020.
  16. ^ Convenience Centers, Amelia County, Virginia, official government website. Retrieved December 8, 2021.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g Who Was Who in America, Historical Volume, 1607-1896. Chicago: Marquis Who's Who. 1963.
  18. ^ Scruggs, Lawson Andrew (1893). Women of Distinction: Remarkable in Works and Invincible in Character. Raleigh, North Carolina: L. A. Scruggs. p. 247. OCLC 4255360.

External links

This page was last edited on 20 June 2022, at 22:53
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