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Allan Turner Howe

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Allan Turner Howe
Allan Turner Howe.png
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Utah's 2nd district
In office
January 3, 1975 – January 3, 1977
Preceded byWayne Owens
Succeeded byDavid Daniel Marriott
Personal details
Born(1927-09-06)September 6, 1927
South Cottonwood, Utah
DiedDecember 14, 2000(2000-12-14) (aged 73)
Arlington, Virginia
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materUniversity of Utah
Professionattorney
Military service
Allegiance United States of America
Branch/service
Flag of the United States Coast Guard.svg
United States Coast Guard
Years of service1946–1947

Allan Turner Howe (September 6, 1927 – December 14, 2000) was a U.S. Representative from Utah.

Born in South Cottonwood near Murray, Utah, Howe attended public schools before receiving a B.S. from the University of Utah in 1952 and a J.D.L. from the same university in 1954. He served in the United States Coast Guard from 1946 to 1947.

He held a number of legal and governmental jobs, including as deputy Salt Lake County attorney, South Salt Lake city attorney, administrative assistant and field representative to U.S. Senator Frank E. Moss from 1959 to 1964, assistant attorney general of Utah from 1965 to 1966, administrative assistant to Governor Cal Rampton from 1966 to 1968, and executive director of the Four Corners Regional Development Commission from 1968 to 1972. He also practiced law in Salt Lake City, served as a delegate to Utah State Democratic conventions from 1954 to 1960 and was an alternate delegate to the 1960 Democratic National Convention.

Howe was elected as a Democrat to the Ninety-fourth Congress in 1974.

After being arrested for soliciting an undercover police officer posing as a prostitute, he lost reelection to Republican Dan Marriott in 1976.[1][2]

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  • ✪ Boston University Commencement 2019

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(brass ensemble and percussion playing) (cheering) (laughing) (screaming and cheering) (cheering) >> Hi, Mom! (music continues) >> Yay! (laughs) (cheering) (music continues) (cheering) (cheering) (music continues) (cheering) (drums playing) >> Whassup! (cheering) (band playing) >> Hi, Mom! (cheering) (cheers and laughs) (band playing) (cheering) (Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance" playing) ("Pomp and Circumstance" continues) (cheering) ("Pomp and Circumstance" ends) (cheers and applause) >> Good afternoon. I'm Kenneth Feld, chairman of Boston University's Board of Trustees. On behalf of all the trustees and overseers, it's my honor to declare the 146th commencement of Boston University is now in order. (cheers and applause) I ask that you please remain standing for the national anthem, to be led by Mr. Dylan Gregg, who is graduating with his bachelor's degree in music from the College of Fine Arts. And following the anthem, remain standing for the invocation. (snare drum rolling, brass playing intro) >> ♪ O say can you see ♪ ♪ By the dawn's early light ♪ ♪ What so proudly we hailed ♪ ♪ At the twilight's last gleaming ♪ ♪ Whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ Through the perilous fight ♪ ♪ O'er the ramparts we watched ♪ ♪ Were so gallantly streaming ♪ ♪ And the rockets' red glare ♪ ♪ The bombs bursting in air ♪ ♪ Gave proof through the night ♪ ♪ That our flag was still there ♪ ♪ Oh, say does that star-spangled banner ♪ Yet wave ♪ ♪ O'er the land of the free ♪ ♪ And the home of the brave ♪ (anthem ends) (cheers and applause) >> The invocation will be delivered by Reb Jevin Eagle, executive director of Boston University's Hillel House. Thereafter, President Robert Brown will preside over the ceremonies. >> We are joyous! We are grateful! We are amazed! Barukh Atah Adonai, Eloheinu Melekh ha-olam, she-hehiyanu v'kiyimanu v'higianu lazman hazeh. Thank you, God, for giving us life, for sustaining us, and for bringing us to this special occasion. Today, we celebrate a moment of completion, yet we call it "commencement," beginning. In the beginning of all beginnings, we are told that the first human being was created b'tzelem elohim, "in the divine image." Why, our tradition asks, does God begin with just one person? To promote peace. So no person could say to their friend, "My ancestors are greater than yours." And also to express the grandeur of the creator. A human stamps many coins from the same die, and all the coins come out the same. God stamps every person from the same die, yet no person is quite like their friend. The story of our earliest beginnings teaches the radical equality, uniqueness, and preciousness of every human soul. And yet, it also teaches it is not good for a human to be alone. God creates for the first human another human, to be a partner. We are each precious, but we are not alone. An ancient story is told, one day, a man was walking along a road when he saw an old woman planting a carob tree. The man said to her, "What are you doing? "Don't you know how long it will take for this tree to bear fruit?" The old woman smiled and said, "I know. It will take 70 years." The man exclaimed, "Do you think you're going to live long enough to benefit from this tree?" The woman smiled again. "I found a world full of carob trees. "Just as my ancestors planted for me, so I plant for my descendants." Graduates, there are many special people here today who know exactly what this story means. May your journey be blessed with the fruits of their wisdom, their labor, and their love. May you see the other as partner and image of God. May you walk along the road of life planting lots of trees. May you only be at the beginning of finding meaning, joy, and peace. Amen. (cheers and applause) >> Please be seated. Good afternoon, and welcome to Boston University's commencement exercises. It is a pleasure to welcome the graduates and their guests, and also to welcome those of you who are joining us via broadcast on the radio and on the internet. I now present Ms. Adia Turner, a senior who will receive... (cheers and applause) ...her bachelor's degree in the College of Arts and Sciences. She will speak on behalf of the class of 2019. Ms. Turner. (cheers and applause) >> Thank you, President Brown, distinguished faculty, and esteemed guests. >> We love you, Adia! >> (chuckles) Before I start my speech, a wise man once told me-- A.K.A. my dad-- to revel and bask in this moment right here. And I think this applies to the class of 2019 and our guests. So I would really appreciate it if you guys could join me in taking a deep breath so we can all enjoy the power of this moment, and so I can get rid of some of my nerves. So on the count of three-- one, two, three. Thank you. (cheers and applause) Anyone who knows me knows how much I love Boston University. I dreamed of becoming a Triple Terrier, meaning I would get my undergraduate, graduate, and doctorate degrees from B.U. I wanted to become a professor here, and then take Dean Elmore's job. (laughter) And in my old age, pass away while teaching a class so the university would have to name a building after me. >> (laughing) (laughter) >> Preferably the library. (laughing) Yeah, it was a pretty intense plan. And while my dreams are different now, the depth of my love for B.U. remains the same. Boston University has helped me find something I had not even known I'd been looking for-- my voice. I arrived on Commonwealth Avenue in the September of 2015 as an 18-year-old Georgia peach from a town that has more chickens than people. Talk about a culture shock! I began to question myself. I was constantly wondering, was I smart enough? Did I deserve to be here? How was I going to survive without being able to rely on my parents every day? And did I really belong at a school that only had Pepsi and no Coke products? (laughter) (cheers and applause) So when my parents finally left me at room 1113, tower A, in Warren... (cheering) I cried. And cried, and cried. I cried for two weeks straight. Like many of us, I was a frightened, insecure teenager that day almost four years ago. But since then, B.U. has helped me grow confident in the woman I am and confident that my voice matters. I found my voice within the walls of the Howard Thurman Center, where I sat religiously every Friday for coffee and conversation. I found my voice as a student adviser for orientation, leading incoming freshmen around campus and Terrier-shuffling my way to greatness. I found my voice in the embrace of Posse 8... (cheering) Otherwise known as Posse Great Heavyweights. The combined strength of those 11 amazing, beautiful individuals pushed me to be better than I ever thought I could be. And right here, right now, I know that mine is not the only voice of one crying out in the wilderness. We, the class of 2019, have heard our collective voice grow over these past years as we have found out who we are. We have been inspired by faculty and staff to voice opinions during difficult conversations about complex issues. They have pushed us to not only engage in these dialogues academically, but also sociologically, humanely, and with a deep sense of community. They have forced us to pop this 1.2-mile-long B.U. bubble and look past ourselves into the increasingly global society we are now entering. As witnesses to a political, cultural, and social shift that could have scared us into silence, we instead have turned our volumes up. We have witnessed a particularly polarizing and divisive presidential election, two vastly different presidencies, nine of the worst mass shootings in American history, the birth of the Women's March, the March for Our Lives movement, and the #metoo campaign. We have witnessed the rise of overt racism, homophobia, and xenophobia, and, through it all, we have learned to speak up and speak out about the world we dream of, but most importantly, the world we know we deserve. The class of 2019 has held vigils, walkouts, protests, and demonstrations for tragedies like the Pittsburgh temple shooting, the New Zealand mosque shooting, and shootings that take place in the United States of America every day. We in our time have helped to elect the second all-minority student government slate in Boston University history! (cheers and applause) We have created publications, organizations, and coalitions like BUnited and "Charcoal" magazine. Our booming, powerful, collective voice cannot and should not fall silent just because we move on from Commonwealth Avenue. We... We are the legacy of a long line of powerful voices, most notably the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. I hear Dr. King's voice in my mind right now as I look onto the field at all of you. He reminds us, "Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter." So, class of 2019, shout at the stars and scream at the sky if you have to, because our voices deserve to be heard. Cry out with joy that we have survived this whirlwind journey at B.U.-- a journey filled with all-nighters at Mugar, happy tears because we passed chem 101. (laughs) Sad tears because we still have to take orgo, laughter in common rooms over nights at the tavern... (exhales) And love for the friends who have stood beside us the entire way. In conclusion, let us carry our proud, strong voices into the next season of our lives, whatever those may be, as we continue searching for greatness. We were built for this. Congratulations to my class, the class of 2019, for graduating. We did it! Thank you! (cheers and applause) >> Thank you, Ms. Turner. I would now like to call upon Mr. Jackson Feder, a senior from the Questrom School of Business, Ms. Mary Milad, a senior from the College of Arts and Sciences, and Ms. Polen Ural, a senior from the Sargent College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences. (cheers and applause) >> Thank you, President Brown. I would like to begin by expressing my profound gratitude and genuine excitement towards being welcomed today into a community of Boston University alumni along so many distinguished scholars, activists, change makers, and innovators. The last time all of us were together was at matriculation just four years ago. As I sat in Agganis Arena without my parents for the first time, I remember feeling paralyzed with anxiety. I felt lost amongst a sea of highly accomplished students in an unfamiliar city full of particularly passionate sports fans. (laughter) At Splash soon after, in an attempt to find a way to anchor myself in this new environment, I joined the mailing list of every single club, of which I attended at most one meeting, and still receive emails from today. Slowly but surely, I found small communities here. Communities like the Callbacks, an on-campus comedy group... (cheers) ...that allowed for this once unfamiliar and overwhelming place to become a home, 1,200 miles away from where I grew up. >> Each of us has pursued our own path since matriculation, but we share one thing-- the gift of an education at Boston University that provided the backbone of our self-growth and finding who we are. So today I encourage you all to reflect on the unique contributions you had during your time here in making B.U. our home and a home for those around us. As an international student from Turkey, I anticipated feeling... (cheers, laughing) I anticipated feeling homesick and adrift at B.U. But similar to Mary's story, the exact opposite happened. And it is for that reason I joined the Class Gift campaign, to give back to the community that has embraced me and so many others. And as alumni, it is up to us to continue on creating a community, the world that lies beyond Commonwealth Avenue. (cheers) >> For those reasons, instead of donating a physical item like a bench, our class gift is a collection of the support made by individual donors-- fellow graduates-- to communities across campus that have had a positive contribution on all of our experiences here, uniting our efforts as a class to build a better B.U. Each of your gifts went to places like the Howard Thurman Center, your respective schools and colleges, and student clubs that have ignited passions, facilitated longstanding relationships, and prepared us all for the next stages of our exciting lives. >> With 2,604 participants, the 2019 Class Gift campaign is on track to be the most successful campaign in Boston University's almost 180-year history. (cheers and applause) We would like to thank everyone who supported the campaign-- committee board members, the development and alumni relations staff, our friends and family, and, of course, every member of the class of 2019 who gave their gift. >> Today we reflect on a chapter of our lives that is closing, but also the one that is beginning. I hope you all consider to support and understand how important your support is, giving back to the school to constantly help form a better B.U.-- a Boston University that provides a diverse pool of strong student organizations and research opportunities designed for and by the students themselves. >> So, President Brown, on behalf of Boston University's newest alumni, it is my pleasure to announce the 2019 Class Gift for the amount of $53,801. (cheers and applause) >> Thank you, Mr. Feder, Ms. Milad, and Ms. Ural. And thank you, the class of 2019. The class gift is a tangible expression of your commitment to Boston University. This commitment began when you first enrolled as students, and is confirmed today as you move into the ranks of alumni. In the life of a university, faculty come and go, presidents come and go, and alumni are its constant-- the never-ending link of its past, present, and future. I am now pleased to present Mary Perry, president of the Boston University Alumni Council, who will speak to you on behalf of the Alumni Association. (cheers and applause) >> Thank you, President Brown. Good afternoon. Congratulations to all on your academic successes that brought you to today's commencement ceremony. Congratulations also to the families and friends who have been there in a supporting role. You have all made it. It is a glorious day, despite the weather, for everyone involved. Congratulations. (applause) I am pleased to welcome the class of 2019 as the newest members to the Boston University Alumni Association. You join a cast of thousands-- actually, over 335,000 enormously talented alumni that make up the Boston University Alumni Association. Your alumni provides opportunities for you to stay informed about what's going on at B.U., to stay connected with your friends and classmates, and to take advantage of the network of thousands of alumni who volunteer their time and talents to support fellow Terriers with career advice, job opportunities, or simply navigating a new city where Terriers already live. And yes, we have an app for all that. Look for it in your favorite app store. All these opportunities are at your fingertips and yours for the taking. Why does the Alumni Association do all this? Very simply, we love B.U., and we want to create a wider B.U. community. The community we seek is one for us to belong to beyond our years of study. It is a community whose members share a common beginning, forged at B.U. in the dorms, in off-campus apartments, at Agganis Arena, or maybe at the BUild Lab. Our roots also stem from the classrooms and the labs that were led by our amazing, world-class faculty. Just as our professors presented us with the challenges, let me set one final challenge for you. I call it the Triple Crown Challenge. On this, the 150th anniversary of when the Commonwealth of Massachusetts chartered Boston University, in 1869, our university founders established a profound charter that they summarized in the words, "Learning, virtue, piety." Our founders' values are enshrined most often under three crowns, triple crowns, on our university seal. That seal is on the diplomas you receive this weekend, as well as on buildings and pavements all over campus. Did you tempt fate before this weekend by stepping on the big one outside Marsh Chapel? >> Yes! >> Yeah, well, I'm thinking probably not for most of us, because you made it here today, and we know what happens when you don't. So here's the Triple Crown Challenge: define the founders' core values in your own words. What do learning, virtue, and piety mean to you? In them, our founders chose inspiring words, words that allow each of us to decide how to learn, what makes a person virtuous, how does one embrace piety. Dare I say, in these days, humility? Here is an example. The greatest virtue I learned, one that made me a more pious person, one, was one that I learned just a few years after I graduated from B.U. Remember nothing else of what I say today, remember this-- that virtue is respect. This is what I was told: "If you give respect, "you will get respect. "If you don't give respect, no one has reason to respect you." What I discovered over the years is the depth of the wisdom of those simple words. So many benefits come from showing respect, but the greatest benefit of all to me is how it promotes civility in discourse-- something we could certainly use more of in all walks of life today. So, go out there and show respect to others. Show that respect that you deserve in return. One by one, we can contribute to a civil society and create treasured friendships in the process. It's likely you've already been doing that. You've created friends that you've made here at B.U. Thankfully, I learned that lesson early enough to cherish two classmates of mine years ago, and more recently, the members of the Boston University Alumni Council, many of whom are seated on this platform. From decades ago to just a few years ago, these treasured friends have endured and renewed my belief in this simple but profound idea of respect. Finally, once this day becomes a memory, consider coming back to campus to keep the treasure of your B.U. connection alive. If not before then, please come to alumni weekend this September, when we will celebrate all things B.U., including an historic celebration at Agganis Arena. On behalf of over 335,000 of your fellow alumni, my heartiest best wishes to you for a bright future filled with deep respect, great friends, and enormous success. (applause) >> Thank you, Ms. Perry. Teaching is an art. It is also one of the most important functions of a university, as it helps to mold the next generation of informed citizens and creative thinkers, many of whom are with us today. The late Dr. Arthur G.B. Metcalf, an alumnus, faculty member, and trustee, founded and endowed the Metcalf Cup and Prize for excellence in teaching at Boston University to recognize great practitioners of this art. Candidates for the award are nominated by members of the Boston University community, and a committee of faculty and students then submits its recommendations to the university provost and to me. It is indeed difficult to select a winner of the Metcalf Cup and Prize, because all of the candidates are outstanding. The two, two finalists in the competition will receive the Metcalf Award for excellence in teaching. Will Dean Jeffrey Hutter of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine please present the winner of the 2019 Metcalf Award for excellence in teaching? >> Mr. President, it's an honor to present Dr. Neal Fleisher, winner of the 2019 Metcalf Award. (cheers and applause) >> What does Rembrandt have to do with dentistry? Plenty, according to Neal H. Fleisher, of the Henry M. school-- Goldman School of Dental Medicine. He believes that close observation is fundamental to the practice of dentistry. A signature assignment for his first-year students is a trip to the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum to observe and discuss art. The more they look, the more they see. The more they discuss and debate, the more they learn that there is rarely one correct answer. Their observational skill improves, which in turn improves their diagnostic skill and patient care. Students suggest the real artist at work here is Dr. Fleisher himself. They praise his communication skills, understanding nature, fair-mindedness, while describing his teaching as "a very enjoyable learning journey "of supportive thinking and questioning "that develops critical thinking that will make me a better clinician." In the classroom, Dr. Fleisher's probing questions lead students ever deeper into the complexity of their work, and challenge them to think about their thinking. A colleague notes that he also teaches the teachers in the application of new pedagogies. Dr. Fleisher joined our faculty in 1986 as an outstanding dentist with little training as a teacher. Today, he is one of our outstanding educators. In recognition of that evolution, we are proud to present Neal H. Fleisher with the Metcalf Award for excellence in teaching. (cheers and applause) Will Dean Susan Fournier of the Questrom School of Business... (cheers and applause) ...present the winner of the 2019 Metcalf Award for excellence in teaching? >> President Brown, I am honored to present to you Gregory Stoller, senior lecturer, Department of Strategy and Innovation at Questrom School of Business, Metcalf Award-winner, 2019. (cheers and applause) >> Gregory L. Stoller has contributed greatly to curriculum innovation and experimental learning since coming to the Questrom School of Business in 2015. His efforts include launching three extracurricular programs, creating two entirely new courses, and mentoring numerous students participating in business plan and venture capital competitions. He is a talented and versatile instructor who uses educational technology to engage students and push them to think more deeply. He also brings a wealth of industry experience to the classroom. His perspective as founder of a commercial real estate firm informs his classes on entrepreneurship, and his many years of work in Asian markets brings valuable insights to his work in international business. In other areas, his extensive professional network provides learning resources and invaluable contacts for his students. Annual reviews consistently rank him among the top one percent of full-time faculty. Course evaluations speak to his success. Students praise "one-of-a-kind life teacher," who "incorporates his years "of business and entrepreneurial experience into classroom lessons," and call him an "entertaining and informative professor" who "enriches learning with critical-thinking skills." His nominator adds that, under his guidance, students' worldview and understanding of global business have expanded greatly. Today, Boston University proudly presents Gregory L. Stoller with the Metcalf Award for excellence in teaching. (cheers and applause) Will Dean of Arts and Sciences Stan Sclaroff present the winner of the 2019 Metcalf Cup and Prize for excellence in teaching? (applause) >> President Brown, I have the honor to present Robinson Wally Fulweiler, the winner of the 2019 Metcalf Cup and Prize. (cheers and applause) >> Since arriving at Boston University in 2008, Robinson Wally Fulweiler has excelled as a teacher, mentor, and researcher, and has emerged as an innovative voice in the Department of Earth and Environment on issues relating to pedagogy and student experience. Professor Fulweiler seeks to, in her words, "ignite sparks of curiosity and light fires of passion," which she does exceedingly well, often through untraditional teaching methods. In one course, she doesn't assign a textbook. In another, she begins an oceanography lecture with Coleridge's "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner" to instill an appreciation of humanity's timeless connection to the sea. "But," says her nominator, "all that experimentation does not obscure a simple fact: "she is an excellent teacher because she cares deeply about her students." Her students agree, observing that Professor Fulweiler "genuinely cares" and "really wants her students to succeed." They go on to describe a humorous, passionate, charismatic and knowledgeable professor who uses different methods to teach and explains concepts extremely well. She is equally devoted to mentoring the next generation of scientists, overseeing a staggering number of research projects, directed studies, and honors theses. Graduate students in her laboratory have won competitive fellowships from the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Science Foundation, and have gone on to careers as researchers and teachers. One of the students said emphatically that, "Professor Fulweiler deserves the best teaching award!" We agree. We are honored to present Robinson W. Fulweiler Boston University's highest teaching award, the Metcalf Cup and Prize for excellence in teaching. (cheers and applause) We will now present the candidates for the university's honorary degree. Will Trustee Alicia Mullen escort our honored guest to the podium? >> Mr. President. >> Trustee Mullen. >> I have the honor to... to present Lauren Shuler Donner for Boston University's honorary degree. (cheers and applause) >> Superlatives flow freely in Hollywood and lose their power. But for you, the superlatives stay strong. You have produced a long list of mega-hits: "Mr. Mom," "Pretty in Pink," "St. Elmo's Fire," "Free Willy," "You've Got Mail," "Any Given Sunday," and "Deadpool." (cheers and applause) Your film "Dave" was nominated for an Academy Award and a Golden Globe. "The Secret Life of Bees" won multiple People's Choice Awards and was named best picture by the NAACP Image Awards. And the "X-Men" franchise you created is a box-office juggernaut. (cheers and applause) In all, your films have grossed over $7 billion. You co-founded a production company. You earned a Lifetime Achievement Award at the Ojai Film Festival and a Producer Icon Award from "Premiere" magazine, and two prestigious Crystal Awards from Women in Film. You even have a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. (cheers and applause) That's quite a journey for someone who got her start as one of the first women to work as a television camera operator. Along the way... (cheers and applause) ...you have generously given time and energy and means to numerous charitable organizations. In recognition of this, you have been honored by both the American Cancer Society and Lupus L.A. Lauren Shuler Donner, your creativity excites us, your drive inspires us, and your generosity humbles us. Boston University is proud to count you among our alumni and to confer upon you the degree Doctor of Humane Letters, Honoris Causa. (cheers and applause) Will Trustee Elizabeth Thors escort our honored guest to the podium? >> Mr. President. >> Trustee Thors. >> I... it is with great honor that I present Karen Holmes Ward for Boston University's honorary degree. (cheers and applause) >> In a time of division and heated discourse, it is easy to forget that the media can actually bring us together. Then you remind us. As director of public affairs and community services for WCVB-TV, you oversee public service and community outreach with projects such as Commonwealth 5, the groundbreaking web initiative matching viewer donors with not-for-profits. You are executive producer and hoster of "CityLine," an award-winning weekly TV magazine that addresses the concerns and issues facing people of color in the Boston area. Your documentary "Return to Glory" told the story of one of the United States' first black military regiments, the Massachusetts 54th. It reminded us of our shared history and shared destiny. You've received numerous Emmy nominations, and you've been inducted into the Massachusetts Broadcasters Hall of Fame and the silver circle of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, which honors professional excellence and lifetime achievement. You remind us, too, with your tireless work in the community, serving on the boards of several non-profits and mentoring their members in the use of television. For more than 40 years as an executive, journalist, community advocate, and student here at Boston University, you've reminded us just how inspiring media can be in the hands of someone talented, thoughtful, responsible, and kind. Karen Holmes Ward, for these qualities and your prodigious accomplishments, we confer upon you the degree of Doctor of Humane Letters, Honoris Causa. (cheers and applause) (applause) Will Trustee Kenneth Menges escort our honored guest to the podium? >> Mr. President. >> Trustee Menges. >> I have the high honor to present John P. Howe III for Boston University's honorary degree. (applause) >> Your deep faith and commitment to public service bring to mind these words from scripture: "We glory in tribulations also, "knowing that tribulation worketh patience; and patience, experience; and experience, hope." In a lifetime of service, you've helped countless people through the darkness of tribulation to the light of hope. Perhaps your most notable position was as president and C.E.O. of the aptly named Project Hope, an international health, education, and humanitarian assistance foundation that provides care for the world's most vulnerable population. Under your leadership, Project Hope greatly expanded its services while carrying out relief missions around the world. But Project Hope is just one highlight of a career spent at the highest levels of medical diplomacy, health policy, education, research, and business. As C.E.O. of the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, you helped lift many of their programs to national prominence. You were instrumental in the development of the University of Massachusetts Medical School. You've held numerous university appointments, served on a multitude of councils and boards, and received too many awards to list here. John P. Howe III, Boston University is proud to call you one of its own, both as an alumnus of B.U., Boston University School of Medicine, and longtime member of the Board of Trustees. And we are honored today to confer upon you the degree Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa. (cheers and applause) Will Trustee Kenneth Feld and University Provost Jean Morrison escort our honored guest to the podium? >> Mr. President. >> Trustee Feld. >> I have the honor to present Marcia McNutt for Boston University's honorary degree. (cheers and applause) >> According to a colleague, you have "a spine of iron." One thing we know is, you don't shy away from a challenge. In college, a professor called it a "silly" mistake for you to major in physics. You not only became the first woman to earn a physics degree from Colorado College, but you graduated summa cum laude. (cheering and applause) It wasn't the last time you upended perception and reality in your field. You were the first woman to lead the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, the first woman to lead the United States Geological Survey, and the National Academy of Sciences, as well. And you were the first woman to serve as the executive editor-in-chief of the "Science" journals. (cheers and applause) Yet, even more impressive than your trailblazing, are your accomplishments in science. At the U.S. Geological Survey, you led responses to numerous major disasters, including the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. As a researcher, you've solved perplexing questions about the Earth's upper mantle and lithosphere. You advanced the use of diverse technologies in marine geophysics, such as artificial intelligence in complex undersea missions. And you've participated in more than a dozen deep-sea expeditions, mostly as chief scientist. Your grace under pressure has earned you many awards, including the Coast Guard's Meritorious Service Medal and the American Geophysical Union's Maurice Ewing Medal for contributions to deep-sea exploration. Marcia McNutt, for your leadership, your courage, and your scientific accomplishments, Boston University proudly confers upon you the degree Doctor of Science, Honoris Causa. (cheers and applause) I now call upon Dr. Marcia McNutt to deliver the 146th commencement address of Boston University. (cheers and applause) >> 2019 graduates, proud parents, family, and guests, distinguished faculty, and members of the podium party, it is my honor to be your commencement speaker. I'm especially humbled when I hear of the accomplishments of my fellow honorees receiving honorary degrees today. It's an amazing group of people and I am so thrilled to be joining the ranks of those who call Boston University their university. Now please join me in a round of applause for the graduates! (cheers and applause) All of you are so fortunate to be earning your degrees from such a distinguished and prestigious university. Boston University was founded in 1839, which makes this its 180th anniversary. By U.S. standards, that makes B.U. old, historic, and distinguished. Universities are among the longest continuously operating institutions in all of human history. The University of Bologna was founded in Italy in the year 1088, making it 931 years old. Oxford was founded just a few years later. So, what explains the enduring nature of universities? I don't think it's necessarily because they are innately nimble to keep up with the times. I mean, look at all of us here on the podium, and in fact,, all of you graduates down there, parading around in costumes that are straight out of the Middle Ages. (laughter) Rather, I suspect that for 1,000 years, humankind has valued the sort of critical thinking that is sparked and nurtured by a university education. This sort of preparation has never gone out of style. In fact, Adia Turner has already told you about how you've all grown in your confidence here. In fact, Adia and I spent a lot of time talking about our presentations today, and we totally are on the same page about that. (laughter) Now, it's possible-- and I ask you to talk to your parents for confirmation-- that one day you won't remember some of the material that you've learned during your time here at B.U. That day could come as soon as tomorrow, depending on how hard you party tonight. (cheers and applause) Uh, but, but, graduates, from today on, your life will forever be divided into two periods. There's BC and A.D., where BC is before college and A.D. is after your degree. (cheers and applause) And during the BC period, most important decisions were made for you by your parents. And after degree, you're on your own. Okay? And your education here has given you the ability to make those decisions for yourself. Now, compared to our medieval ancestors, the ones who came up with these lovely costumes, in many ways, life is easier today. But in other ways, it's more confusing. We're facing a perplexing array of complex decisions that affect personal health, safety, well-being, but more importantly, the future viability of our planetary life-support systems, such as clean air, fresh water, biodiversity, rich topsoil, and a comfortable climate. We have more information at our fingertips than ever before, but, in today's world of misinformation and disinformation, it's all being weaponized to obscure the truth. So how are you going to easily distinguish what and who to trust so that you'll make good decisions? Now, what I'll argue today is that scientists have established rules for systematically deciding what to trust, and that's-- those rules have served society and science well for many years. The basis of trust in science is transparency, control of bias, and the ability to independently verify results. These rules are simply expressed as: describe your methods, show your data, declare any relationships that might be perceived to have biased your views, consider what other hypotheses could possibly explain your results-- so, consider alternatives-- and then, finally, subject your findings to criticism from an independent verification by others. Well, I've described this set of rules as the methods of science. They don't just apply to science. This set of procedures for deciding what to trust can be applied broadly to proposals or findings based on evidence from many sources: socioeconomics, marketing, social networks, communications, commerce, transportation, or any other areas of human decision-making where evidence and data are paramount. So let's try this out. Let's suppose my hypothesis is that only one in ten of you graduates will remember in one week's time anything of substance from this commencement address. (laughter) All right. Now, let's suppose I gather some data and I find the startling result that half of you remember that the commencement address was about who and what to trust. Should you believe it? Well, the first thing you should do is ask: What method was used to survey all of you graduates in order to come up with that 50% number? Suppose I answer that my method was to send out an email to all of you, a week later, with the subject line: "Respond with information on the content of the commencement address." That should be your first warning that my survey was flawed. Most of you students would probably look at that email and say, "What commencement address?" Delete, delete, delete. So only the few of you who even recalled that there was a commencement speaker would even open the email. So the survey will get a very biased result from the few of you that say, "Oh, yeah, someone spoke to us," and those few that then open it, some proportion of them will remember the topic. Those who forgot the speech won't even respond. So this is clearly a result that you should not trust. A better way to collect this data would be for me to randomly call the students, and ask them about the commencement speech, but, of course, that would be a lot more work. So to get trustworthy results requires a lot of extra work-- remember that. Now, let's take a more pertinent example. Who should you trust when you go to vote at the polls? A candidate whose platform sounds good because it promises prosperity for everyone? But suppose that candidate is secretive about his or her own business dealings? (laughter, calling) Who did that? Or... or fuzzy about campaigning financing? (crowd calling) Or has flip-flopped in the past on issues of importance? Or do you support a candidate whose platform might not be quite so rosy, but he or she is transparent about his or her own finances, discloses who has contributed to his or her campaign, and who has consistently worked for policies in the public interest? I personally would not trust someone who has the potential to be biased by special interests, who doesn't disclose personal finances and therefore may not be working in the public interest. Now, year after year, opinion polls consistently show that the public rates scientists among the most trusted profession, and-- what a surprise-- politicians among the least. Perhaps if we chose our politicians using the criteria of trust used by scientists to screen their findings, we would have a more favorable outcome with our elected leaders. Now, let me give you a real-world example of using the rules of science to solve differences of opinion to get to a place of trust. Now, President Brown already told you about my work on the Deepwater Horizon spill. Most of you were mere children, when, nine years ago, the Deepwater Horizon rig in the Gulf of Mexico exploded. 11 lives were lost, and it triggered an uncontrollable oil spill. I was the director of the U.S. Geological Survey at the time, and the secretary of the Interior dispatched me to the Gulf of Mexico to oversee a team of U.S. government scientists and engineers working with BP to contain the oil and control the well. I had been sent to the front lines of the crisis on account of my prior experience with deep-sea intervention and deep-sea drilling. But I was joined in Houston by many other talented government leaders. We spent months in Houston with our sleeves rolled up, evaluating the viability of options to stop that spill. Now, the U.S. government and BP disagreed on many issues, but we all agreed that stopping the flowing well was the highest priority. Although there was not a lot of trust between the two parties, we all agreed that we needed to rely on science and engineering to solve the problem. And if at any time there was a difference of opinion on the best path forward, we would let the rules of science guide us on how to resolve our differences. We would gather evidence, we would share our data, and we would independently check each other's work until we resolved the disagreement. By relying on the scientific approach, we were able to stop the spill by deploying novel technologies. Now, imagine instead that the Deepwater Horizon oil spill were to happen today. What would be the approach in the post-truth era of fake news and distrust of expertise? Perhaps in today's environment, U.S. politicians and BP business leaders would not trust scientists to solve the problem. And science and engineering might not prevail in plotting a course of action on something as important as capping the well. In such an environment, business leaders at BP might insist that since they were paying for the work and since they were shouldering the liability, they had the right to dictate the course of action. Political leaders in Washington might balk at granting permission for the well-control options if BP was unilaterally calling the shots without government input. BP business leaders and U.S. politicians would have no common set of rules, like the rules of science, for deciding how to resolve their differences short of tying up the entire matter in the courts. All the while, the well continued to spill oil. I'd like to think that such a scenario is far-fetched, but, nevertheless, the overall recent trend to use gut instinct and the preferences of special interests to replace science and evidence is having real-world consequences. There is no better example than the denial in the U.S. of the urgent need for action on climate change. (cheers and applause) This places the U.S. in the singular position of being the only nation on Earth to opt out of the Paris Accord. Now, I don't want to give you the impression that science and scientists are perfect. They are not. There are bad apples in science, and even good scientists can make mistakes. But the rules of science have self-correcting mechanisms built into them to help ferret out fraudulent work and to correct honest mistakes. This is why, when they are found, they are front-page news. It is the duty of scientists to call out anyone who violates the public trust. So now, in closing, whether the issue is health care, economics, education, or immigration, thanks... (train whistle blowing, laughter) We'll let the train go. (cheers and applause) Thanks to your university education, you have been instilled with the larger worldview to see beyond just your own lives and that of your own generation. Your choices will have profound and lasting impacts on others near and far and the world that your children and your grandchildren are going to inherit. I call upon you to make those decisions based on the truth. When you see junk science, call it out. When you don't trust the sources, call them out. When your friends share misinformation on Facebook, set them straight. I do this all the time. In a nice, respectful, fact-based, nonjudgmental way, but don't let them get away with it. Because the truth does still matter. Now, there are some moments in this lifetime when we will feel large and important, such as this moment for all of you, in receiving your degrees. And there are other times when we feel very small and insignificant, for example, when we stare up at a clear night sky to ponder the vast regions of space and time. But never, for a moment, doubt that your choices matter. Trust wisely, my friends, and help others do the same. The future depends on your choices, and just importantly, how you make them. I'm counting on you, 2019 graduates-- trust well. Thank you. (cheers and applause) >> We shall now present the candidates for degrees. >> Mr. President. >> Provost Morrison. >> Mr. President, I have the honor to call for the presentation of the candidates for degrees, as recommended by the faculty of Boston University's schools and colleges. And to the candidates for your degrees: as your school or college and your degree are called, please rise and remain standing until all the schools and colleges have been called. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Professor Preston. >> Mr. President, I have the great, great honor to present the 2019 Arvind and Chandan Nandlal Kilachand Honors College Scholars. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Moore. >> Mr. President, I have the great honor to present to you candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, as recommended enthusiastically by the faculty of the School of Theology. Mr. President, I joyfully commend to you the candidates for the Doctor of Ministry degree, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Theology. And, Mr. President, I proudly present to you the candidates for Master's of Sacred Music, Master's of Divinity, Master's of Theological Studies, and Master's of Sacred Music, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Theology. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Hutter. >> Mr. President, it is an honor to present the candidates for a Doctor of Philosophy degree, as recommended by the faculty of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. Mr. President, it is an honor to present the candidates for the Doctor of Science, Doctor of Science in Dentistry degrees, as recommended by the faculty of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. Mr. President, it's an honor to present the candidates for the Master of Science in Dentistry degree, as recommended by the faculty of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. Mr. President, it's an honor to present the candidates for the certificate of advanced graduate study, as recommended by the faculty of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. And, Mr. President, it's an honor to present the candidates for the Doctor of Dental Medicine degree, as recommended by the faculty of the Henry M. Goldman School of Dental Medicine. Thank you very much. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Delva. >> I have the honor to present to you the candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy degrees recommended by the faculty of the School of Social Work. Mr. President, I also have the honor to recommend the candidates for the Master of Social Work degree, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Social Work. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Antman. Mr. President, the faculty of the School of Medicine are delighted to present their candidates for the Doctor of Medicine degree, the Doctor of Philosophy degree, the Doctor of Science degree, the Master's in Arts and Sciences. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Upneja. >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present candidates for the degree Master of Management in Hospitality, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Hospitality Administration. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present candidates for the degree Bachelor of Science, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Hospitality Administration. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Galea. >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Public Health degrees, recommended by the faculty of the School of Public Health. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Master of Art, Master of Science, and the Master of Public Health, as recommended by the faculty of the School of Public Health. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Chard. >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present the inaugural candidates for Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education degrees recommended by the graduate faculty of the Wheelock College of Education and Human Development. Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for Master of Education, Master of Science, Master of Arts in Teaching, and the certificate of advanced graduate studies degrees, recommended by the graduate faculty of the Wheelock College of Education and Human Development. (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree, recommended by the faculty of the Wheelock College for Education and Human Development. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Young. (cheers and applause) >> Yes. Yes. (laughs) Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Doctor of Musical Arts degree, as recommended by the faculty in the College of Fine Arts. Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Master of Music, the Master of Fine Arts, the Master of Arts, the Opera Institute, the artist diploma, the performance diploma, the graduate certificate in graphic design, and the certificate of advanced graduate studies degrees, as recommended by the faculty in the College of Fine Arts. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor of Music, the Bachelor of Fine Arts, and the Bachelor of Arts degrees, as recommended by the faculty of the College of Fine Arts. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Onwuachi-Willig. >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Juris Doctor degree, recommended by the faculty of the School of Law. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Master of Law degrees, recommended by the faculty of the School of Law. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Zlateva. >> I have the honor to present the candidates for the Master's degrees and graduate certificates, as recommended by the Metropolitan College faculty. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor degrees and the undergraduate certificates, as recommended by the Metropolitan College faculty. (cheers and applause) >> President Brown. >> Dean Najam. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President, the rain has stopped, the sun is out, and I have the great honor to present to you the candidates for the degrees of Master of Arts, Master of Global Policy, and graduate certificates in African Studies and Asian Studies at the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, as recommended by the faculty. Mr. President... (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the great honor also to present to you the candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts in Asian Studies, European Studies, Latin American Studies, Middle East and North African Studies, and in International Relations at the Frederick S. Pardee School of Global Studies, as recommended by the faculty. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Moore. >> I have the honor to present the candidates for the Doctor of Philosophy, the Doctor of Occupational Therapy, and the Doctor of Physical Therapy degrees, as recommended by the faculty of the College of, of Rehab, of... (laughs) Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College. (laughter, cheers and applause) Mr. President, I also have the honor to present the candidates for the Master of Science degree, as recommended by the faculty of the College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College. Mr. President, I also have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor of Science degree, as recommended by the faculty of the College of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences: Sargent College. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Lutchen. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy as recommended by the faculty of the College of Engineering. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the degrees of Master's of Engineering by the faculty of the College of Engineering. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor's of Science, as recommended by the faculty of the College of Engineering. (cheers and applause) >> President Brown. >> Dean Fiedler. >> As dean of the college that produced Drs. Shuler Donner and Dr. Holmes Norton, I have the honor to present the candidates for the degrees of Master of Fine Arts, Master of Arts, and Master's of Science. And, Mr. President, I have the honor to present candidates for the degrees of Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor's of Science, as recommended by the College of Communication. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Fournier. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President, I have the honor to present to you the candidates for the degree of the Doctor of Philosophy in Management, as recommended by the faculty of the Questrom School of Business. (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the honor to present to you the candidates for the degrees of Master of Business Administration, Master of Science in Management Studies, Master of Science in Mathematical Finance, Master of Science in Digital Technology, and Master of Science in Nonprofit Leadership. (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the pleasure to present to you the candidates of the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration at Boston University Questrom School of Business. (cheers and applause) >> Mr. President. >> Dean Sclaroff. >> I have the honor to present the Doctor of Philosophy degree candidates, recommended by the faculty of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Master of Arts, the Master of Science, and the Master of Fine Arts degrees, recommended by the faculty of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. (cheers and applause) Mr. President, I have the honor to present the candidates for the Bachelor of Arts degree, recommended by the faculty of the College of Arts and Sciences. (cheers and applause) >> Upon the recommendation of the faculty, and by the authority of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts given to the trustees of Boston University and entrusted by them to me, I hereby confer upon you the degrees you have earned, together with all the appropriate honors, privileges, and responsibilities, in token of which you are granted diplomas. My congratulations to all of you. (cheers and applause) Before you are seated, I would like you to salute your parents. Your accomplishments are built on the support of your family. Please turn to face them and acknowledge once again their role in you reaching your goal. (cheers and applause) Please be seated. The commencement ceremony celebrates the achievements of each of our students, but it means much more. It celebrates the accomplishments of a great academic community, a community where you have studied and worked together in classrooms, laboratories, and studios. It celebrates not only your achievements, but also the efforts of the faculty and staff whose dedication has helped lead you to this marvelous day. On your shoulders rests the enormous responsibility for guiding America and the world, and for addressing the substantial challenges we face. You are the future for this university, for this country, and for humanity. Among the graduates today are those of you who are commissioning in the armed services of the United States. You have chosen to dedicate yourselves to the protection of this country. This university is proud of you and gives you its sincerest thanks. Wherever your tour of duty may take you, Godspeed. (cheers and applause) To the Class of 2019, as you leave Nickerson Field, you join a long line of Boston University graduates stretching over time to include two... some 335,000 living alumni of this great institution. Your accomplishments will be part of the fabric of our legacy. Your Boston University education has prepared you well. Go into the world and make it a better place. Congratulations. (cheers and applause) >> Will all faculty members, graduates, and their guests rise as Mr. Dylan Gregg leads us in the singing of "Clarissima." Words and music may be found on page 13 of your program. Following "Clarissima," please remain standing for the benediction. (band playing intro) >> ♪ Boston University ♪ ♪ Proud with mission sure ♪ ♪ Keeping the light of knowledge high ♪ ♪ Long to endure ♪ ♪ Treas'ring the best of all that's old ♪ ♪ Searching out the new ♪ ♪ Our alma mater evermore ♪ ♪ Hail B.U. ♪ (song ends) (cheers and applause) >> The Reverend Doctor Robert Allan Hill, dean of Marsh Chapel, will now deliver the benediction. Following the benediction, the 146th commencement of Boston University will conclude. We ask that graduates and guests remain at their places until the platform party, the faculty, and the alumni council have left the field. Thank you, and congratulations. (cheers and applause) >> May we pray. Gracious God of light and love, Thou Who in, in Whose light we see light, illumine our paths as we depart this place into the unforeseen future, Thou true light enlightening every woman and man. Thou Lord, our light and our salvation, brighten our difficult days, we pray; bless our joyful days, we pray; keep a flame of conscience burning in our hearts all our days, we pray. Keep a flame of hope alive in our culture in these days, we pray. Keep a flame of fire, a love burning in the lives of the graduates of 2019, we pray, that, together, we may do all the good we can, at all the times we can, in all the ways we can, in all the places we can, to all the people we can, as long as ever we can. Amen. >> Amen. (band playing) (cheers and applause) (band continues) (band continues) (band playing "Hey! Baby" by Bruce Channel) (song continues) (song continues) (cheering) (song continues) >> ♪ I wanna know won't you be my girl ♪ (song ends) (cheers and applause)

See also

References

  1. ^ Sillito, John (1994), "Howe, Allan Turner", in Powell, Allan Kent (ed.), Utah History Encyclopedia, Salt Lake City, Utah: University of Utah Press, ISBN 0874804256, OCLC 30473917, archived from the original on 2013-10-10
  2. ^ A Timeline of Politicians and Prostitutes, compiled by the library staff of U.S. News & World Report, 3/11/08

External links

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Wayne Owens
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Utah's 2nd congressional district

1975-1977
Succeeded by
David D. Marriott



This page was last edited on 1 February 2020, at 01:56
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