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Alabama's 1st congressional district

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Alabama's 1st congressional district
Alabama US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Alabama's 1st congressional district since January 3, 2013
Representative
  Jerry Carl
RMobile
Area7,182 sq mi (18,600 km2)
Distribution
  • 66.82% urban[1]
  • 33.18% rural
Population (2019)717,438[2]
Median household
income
$50,663[2]
Ethnicity
Cook PVIR+16[3]

Alabama's 1st congressional district is a United States congressional district in Alabama, which elects a representative to the United States House of Representatives. It includes the entirety of Washington, Mobile, Baldwin, Escambia and Monroe counties, and also includes part of Clarke County. The largest city in the district is Mobile.

It is currently represented by Republican Jerry Carl.

Character

Mobile, Alabama is the focus of this district, which extends north along the Tombigbee and Alabama rivers. Timber production remains the biggest source of contributions to the local economy, however recently gulf coast condominium developments in Baldwin county represent new economic possibilities.

Politically, this area was one of the first in Alabama to shake off its Democratic roots. It was one of five districts to swing Republican in 1964, when Barry Goldwater swept the state; the GOP has held the district in every House election since then. However, conservative Democrats continued to hold most state and local offices well into the 1990s.

It supported George W. Bush with 60% of the vote in 2000, and with 64% in 2004. In 2008, John McCain received 61.01% of the vote in the district while 38.38% supported Barack Obama.

The 1st traditionally gives its congressmen very long tenures in Washington, D.C., with only seven men representing the district in Congress in the last century.

Voting

Election results from presidential races
Year Office Results
2000 President Bush 60 - 38%
2004 President Bush 64 - 35%
2008 President McCain 61 - 39%
2012 President Romney 62 - 37%
2016 President Trump 64 - 34%
2020 President Trump 64 - 35%

List of members representing the district

Member Party Years Cong
ress
Electoral history District location and map
District created on March 4, 1823
Gabrielmoore.jpg

Gabriel Moore
Democratic-Republican March 4, 1823 –
March 3, 1825
18th
19th
20th
Redistricted from the at-large district and re-elected in 1823.
Re-elected in 1825.
Re-elected in 1827.
Retired.
1823–1833
"Northern district": Decatur, Jackson, Lauderdale, Lawrence, Limestone, and Madison counties
AL-1 18-22.png
Jacksonian March 4, 1825 –
March 3, 1829
Clement Comer Clay.jpg

Clement Comer Clay
Jacksonian March 4, 1829 –
March 3, 1835
21st
22nd
23rd
Elected in 1829.
Re-elected in 1831.
Re-elected in 1833.
Retired to run for governor.
1833–1841
AL-1 23-26.png
Governor Reuben Chapman.jpg

Reuben Chapman
Jacksonian March 4, 1835 –
March 3, 1837
24th
25th
26th
Elected in 1835.
Re-elected in 1837.
Re-elected in 1839.
Redistricted to the at-large district.
Democratic March 4, 1837 –
March 3, 1841
District inactive March 3, 1841 –
March 3, 1843
27th
James Dellet.jpg

James Dellet
Whig March 4, 1843 –
March 3, 1845
28th Elected in 1843.
Retired.
1843–1855
AL-1 28-33.png
Edmund Strother Dargan Democratic March 4, 1845 –
March 3, 1847
29th Elected in 1845.
Retired.
JohnGayle.jpg

John Gayle
Whig March 4, 1847 –
March 3, 1849
30th Elected in 1847.
Retired.
William J. Alston Whig March 4, 1849 –
March 3, 1851
31st Elected in 1849.
Retired.
John Bragg Democratic March 4, 1851 –
March 3, 1853
32nd Elected in 1851.
Retired.
Philip Phillips.jpg

Philip Phillips
Democratic March 4, 1853 –
March 3, 1855
33rd Elected in 1853.
Retired.
Percy Walker Know Nothing March 4, 1855 –
March 3, 1857
34th Elected in 1855.
Retired.
1855–1863
AL-1 34-36.png
James Adams Stallworth (cropped).jpg

James Adams Stallworth
Democratic March 4, 1857 –
January 12, 1861
35th
36th
Elected in 1857.
Re-elected in 1859.
Withdrew due to Civil War.
Vacant January 12, 1861 –
July 22, 1868
36th
37th
38th
39th
40th
Civil War and Reconstruction
Francis William Kellogg - Brady-Handy.jpg

Francis William Kellogg
Republican July 22, 1868 –
March 3, 1869
40th Elected in 1868 to finish term.
Retired.
1863–1873
AL-1 40-42.png
AEBuck.jpg

Alfred Eliab Buck
Republican March 4, 1869 –
March 3, 1871
41st Elected in 1868.
Retired.
Benjamin S. Turner - Brady-Handy.jpg

Benjamin S. Turner
Republican March 4, 1871 –
March 3, 1873
42nd Elected in 1870.
Lost re-election.
Frederick George Bromberg Liberal Republican March 4, 1873 –
March 3, 1875
43rd Elected in 1872.
Lost re-election.
1873–1877
AL-1 43-44.png
Jeremiah Haralson - Brady-Handy.jpg

Jeremiah Haralson
Republican March 4, 1875 –
March 3, 1877
44th Elected in 1874.
Redistricted to the 4th district and lost re-election.
James T. Jones Democratic March 4, 1877 –
March 3, 1879
45th Elected in 1876.
Lost renomination.
1877–1933
AL-1 45-72.png
Thomas H. Herndon (cropped).jpg

Thomas H. Herndon
Democratic March 4, 1879 –
March 28, 1883
46th
47th
48th
Elected in 1878.
Re-elected in 1880.
Re-elected in 1882.
Died.
Vacant March 28, 1883 –
December 3, 1883
48th
James T. Jones Democratic December 3, 1883 –
March 3, 1889
48th
49th
50th
Elected to finish Herndon's term.
Re-elected in 1884.
Re-elected in 1886.
Retired.
Richard Henry Clarke.jpeg

Richard Henry Clarke
Democratic March 4, 1889 –
March 3, 1897
51st
52nd
53rd
54th
Elected in 1888.
Re-elected in 1890.
Re-elected in 1892.
Re-elected in 1894.
Retired to run for Governor.
George W. Taylor 1902.jpg

George W. Taylor
Democratic March 4, 1897 –
March 3, 1915
55th
56th
57th
58th
59th
60th
61st
62nd
63rd
Elected in 1896.
Re-elected in 1898.
Re-elected in 1900.
Re-elected in 1902.
Re-elected in 1904.
Re-elected in 1906.
Re-elected in 1908.
Re-elected in 1910.
Re-elected in 1912.
Retired.
Oscar Lee Gray Democratic March 4, 1915 –
March 3, 1919
64th
65th
Elected in 1914.
Re-elected in 1916.
Retired.
John McDuffie2.jpg

John McDuffie
Democratic March 4, 1919 –
March 2, 1935
66th
67th
68th
69th
70th
71st
72nd
73rd
74th
Elected in 1918.
Re-elected in 1920.
Re-elected in 1922.
Re-elected in 1924.
Re-elected in 1926.
Re-elected in 1928.
Re-elected in 1930.
Re-elected in 1932.
Re-elected in 1934
Resigned to become U.S. District Judge.
1933–1963
AL-1 73-87.png
Vacant March 2, 1935 –
July 30, 1935
74th
Frank W. Boykin (Alabama Congressman).jpg

Frank W. Boykin
Democratic July 30, 1935 –
January 3, 1963
74th
75th
76th
77th
78th
79th
80th
81st
82nd
83rd
84th
85th
86th
87th
Elected to finish McDuffie's term.
Re-elected in 1936.
Re-elected in 1938.
Re-elected in 1940.
Re-elected in 1942.
Re-elected in 1944.
Re-elected in 1946.
Re-elected in 1948.
Re-elected in 1950.
Re-elected in 1952.
Re-elected in 1954.
Re-elected in 1956.
Re-elected in 1958.
Re-elected in 1960.
Redistricted to the at-large district and lost renomination.
District inactive, all representatives elected at-large. January 3, 1963 –
January 3, 1965
88th
Jack Edwards (Congressman).jpg

Jack Edwards
Republican January 3, 1965 –
January 3, 1985
89th
90th
91st
92nd
93rd
94th
95th
96th
97th
98th
Elected in 1964.
Re-elected in 1966.
Re-elected in 1968.
Re-elected in 1970.
Re-elected in 1972.
Re-elected in 1974.
Re-elected in 1976.
Re-elected in 1978.
Re-elected in 1980.
Re-elected in 1982.
Retired.
1965–1983
AL-1 89-92.png
1983–1993
AL-1 93-102.png
Sonnycallahan.jpg

Sonny Callahan
Republican January 3, 1985 –
January 3, 2003
99th
100th
101st
102nd
103rd
104th
105th
106th
107th
Elected in 1984.
Re-elected in 1986.
Re-elected in 1988.
Re-elected in 1990.
Re-elected in 1992.
Re-elected in 1994.
Re-elected in 1996.
Re-elected in 1998.
Re-elected in 2000.
Retired.
1993–2003
AL-1 103-107.png
Rep. Jo Bonner.jpg

Jo Bonner
Republican January 3, 2003 –
August 2, 2013
108th
109th
110th
111th
112th
113th
Elected in 2002.
Re-elected in 2004.
Re-elected in 2006.
Re-elected in 2008.
Re-elected in 2010.
Re-elected in 2012.
Resigned to become vice-chancellor in University of Alabama System.[4]
2003–2013
AL01 110.png
2013–present
Alabama US Congressional District 1 (since 2013).tif
Vacant August 2, 2013 –
January 8, 2014
113th
Rep Bradley Byrne.jpg

Bradley Byrne
Republican January 8, 2014 –
January 3, 2021
113th
114th
115th
116th
Elected to finish Bonner's term.
Re-elected in 2014.
Re-elected in 2016.
Re-elected in 2018.
Retired to run for U.S. Senator.
Rep. Jerry Carl official photo.jpg

Jerry Carl
Republican January 3, 2021 –
Present
117th Elected in 2020.

Recent election results

2004

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2004
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 161,067 63.12%
Democratic Judy Belk 93,938 36.81%
Write-in 159 0.06%
Total votes 255,164 100%
Republican hold

2006

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2006
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 112,944 68.10%
Democratic Vivian Sheffield Beckerle 52,770 31.82%
Write-in 127 0.08%
Total votes 165,841 100%
Republican hold

2008

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2008[5]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 210,660 98.27%
Write-in 3,707 1.73%
Total votes 214,367 100%
Republican hold

2010

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2010
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 128,802 83.05%
Constitution David M. Walter 26,294 16.95%
Total votes 155,096 100%
Republican hold

2012

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2012
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jo Bonner (Incumbent) 196,374 97.86%
Write-in 4,302 2.14%
Total votes 200,676 100%
Republican hold

2013 (Special)

Alabama's 1st congressional district special election, 2013
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne 36,042 70.66%
Democratic Burton LeFlore 14,968 29.34%
Total votes 51,010 100%
Republican hold

2014

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2014[6]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne (Incumbent) 103,758 68.16%
Democratic Burton LeFlore 48,278 31.71%
Write-in 198 0.13%
Total votes 152,234 100%
Republican hold

2016

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2016[7]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne (Incumbent) 208,083 96.38%
Write-in 7,810 3.62%
Total votes 215,893 100%
Republican hold

2018

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2018[8]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Bradley Byrne (Incumbent) 153,228 63.16%
Democratic Robert Kennedy Jr. 89,226 36.78%
Write-in 163 0.07%
Total votes 242,617 100%
Republican hold

2020

Alabama's 1st congressional district election, 2020[9]
Party Candidate Votes %
Republican Jerry Carl 211,825 64.4
Democratic James Averhart 116,949 35.5
Write-in 301 0.1
Total votes 329,075 100.0
Republican hold

See also

References

Specific
  1. ^ http://proximityone.com/cd113_2010_ur.htm[bare URL]
  2. ^ a b Center for New Media & Promotion (CNMP), US Census Bureau. "My Congressional District". www.census.gov.
  3. ^ "Introducing the 2021 Cook Political Report Partisan Voter Index". The Cook Political Report. April 15, 2021.
  4. ^ Sherman, Jake. "Rep. Jo Bonner to resign". POLITICO.
  5. ^ "Certified General Election Results without write-in appendix" (PDF). Secretary of State of Alabama. November 25, 2008. Archived from the original (PDF) on November 27, 2008. Retrieved December 3, 2008.
  6. ^ "Certified General Election Results" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved December 13, 2014.
  7. ^ "General Election Results November 8, 2016" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved December 14, 2016.
  8. ^ "2018 Official General Elections Results" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. November 27, 2018. Retrieved January 3, 2019.
  9. ^ "State of Alabama - Canvass of Results -" (PDF). Alabama Secretary of State. Retrieved November 23, 2020.
General

External links

This page was last edited on 30 June 2021, at 13:12
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