To install click the Add extension button. That's it.

The source code for the WIKI 2 extension is being checked by specialists of the Mozilla Foundation, Google, and Apple. You could also do it yourself at any point in time.

4,5
Kelly Slayton
Congratulations on this excellent venture… what a great idea!
Alexander Grigorievskiy
I use WIKI 2 every day and almost forgot how the original Wikipedia looks like.
Live Statistics
English Articles
Improved in 24 Hours
Added in 24 Hours
Languages
Recent
Show all languages
What we do. Every page goes through several hundred of perfecting techniques; in live mode. Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better.
.
Leo
Newton
Brights
Milds

Adelphi, London

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Adam Brothers' Adelphi (1768–72) was London's first neoclassical building. Eleven large houses fronted a vaulted terrace, with wharves beneath.
The Adam Brothers' Adelphi (1768–72) was London's first neoclassical building. Eleven large houses fronted a vaulted terrace, with wharves beneath.
11 Adelphi Terrace
Current view of the remaining building at 11 Adelphi Terrace, the furthest left house of the original buildings when viewed from the river.

Adelphi (/əˈdɛlfi/; from the Greek ἀδελφοί adelphoi, meaning "brothers") is a district of the City of Westminster in London.[1] The small district includes the streets of Adelphi Terrace, Robert Street and John Adam Street.[1] Of rare use colloquially, Adelphi is grouped with Aldwych as the greater Strand district (a main street of London between the two areas and those immediately adjoining) which for many decades formed a parliamentary constituency and civil registration district.

Adelphi Buildings

A prospect of London by Alexander Nasmyth, 1826. The Adelphi Buildings can be seen to the left of Waterloo Bridge.
A prospect of London by Alexander Nasmyth, 1826. The Adelphi Buildings can be seen to the left of Waterloo Bridge.
The Art Deco Adelphi building from the 1930s, located at 1-10 John Adam Street.
The Art Deco Adelphi building from the 1930s, located at 1-10 John Adam Street.

The district is named after the Adelphi Buildings, a block of 24 unified neoclassical terrace houses that occupied the land between The Strand and the River Thames in the parish of St Martin in the Fields, which also included a headquarters building for the "Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce" (now generally known as the Royal Society of Arts). They were built between 1768 and 1772 by the Adam brothers (John, Robert, James and William Adam), to whom the buildings' Greek-derived name refers. The ruins of Durham House on the site were demolished for their construction.

Robert Adam was influenced by his extensive visit to Diocletian's Palace in Split, Croatia (previously Dalmatia), and he applied some of this influence to the design of the neoclassical Adelphi Buildings.[2][3] The nearby Adelphi Theatre is named after the Adelphi Buildings.

Many of the Adelphi Buildings were demolished in the early 1930s and replaced with the New Adelphi, a monumental Art Deco building designed by the firm of Collcutt & Hamp. Buildings remaining from the old Adelphi include 11 Adelphi Terrace (formerly occupied by numismatic specialists A.H. Baldwin & Sons Ltd) and the Royal Society of Arts headquarters (which has expanded to incorporate two of the former houses). Benjamin Pollock's Toy Shop was located here in the 1940s.

Notable residents

South Australian Colonization Commission

The South Australian Colonization Commission (1834–1843) had their offices at 6 Adelphi Terrace in 1840.[4] Rowland Hill was secretary to this body, and it was during this period that he devised his penny postage scheme.[5]

London School of Economics

The London School of Economics (LSE) held its first classes in October 1895, in rooms at 9 John Street, Adelphi,[6] before setting up more permanent operations in Number 10 Adelphi Terrace. By 1920, the LSE had moved a few blocks east, to its current Clare Market address. While in Adelphi, the LSE’s scholars and students were active in the surrounding neighbourhood and community.

Street name etymologies

Adelphi has no formally defined boundaries, though they are generally agreed to be: Strand to the north, Lancaster Place to the east, Victoria Embankment to the south and Charing Cross station to the west. The small set of streets east of Northumberland Avenue are included here for convenience.

Several streets are or were named using the words George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham after the first Duke, 17th century courtier, who acquired York House which formerly stood on this site; his son sold the area to developers on condition that his father and titles were commemorated on the new streets.[7]

Notable residents

In media

See also

References

  1. ^ a b Mills, A., Oxford Dictionary of London Place Names, (2001)
  2. ^ Peter De Bolla, The Education of the Eye: Painting, Landscape, and Architecture, 2003, Stanford University Press. 296 pages ISBN 0-8047-4800-4
  3. ^ C. Michael Hogan, "Diocletian's Palace", The Megalithic Portal, Andy Burnham ed, 6 Oct. 2007
  4. ^ The British Almanac of The Society for the Diffusion of Useful Knowledge, for the year of our Lord 1840. Charles Knight & Co. 1840. p. 59. Retrieved 10 December 2020.
  5. ^ "Adelphi Terrace". British History Online. 10 December 2020. Retrieved 10 December 2020.
  6. ^ "LSE 1895". London School of Economics. 2000. Archived from the original on 5 August 2009. Retrieved 23 July 2009.
  7. ^ a b Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p47
  8. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p2
  9. ^ a b c Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p16
  10. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p3
  11. ^ a b c d Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p62-3
  12. ^ a b Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p74
  13. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p65
  14. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p81
  15. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p85
  16. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p102
  17. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p105
  18. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p118
  19. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p123
  20. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p167
  21. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p179-80
  22. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p170
  23. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p184
  24. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p172
  25. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p186
  26. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p194
  27. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p229
  28. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p236
  29. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p267
  30. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p288
  31. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p295-6
  32. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p306
  33. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p312
  34. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p328
  35. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p332
  36. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p334
  37. ^ Bebbington, G. (1972) London Street Names, p337-8
  38. ^ Fairfield, S. The Streets of London – A dictionary of the names and their origins, p349
  39. ^ 'The Strand, southern tributaries – continued', Old and New London: Volume 3 (1878), pp. 100–110 accessed: 30 May 2008
  40. ^ a b Gater, G H; Wheeler, E P, eds. (1937), "Adelphi Terrace", Survey of London: Volume 18, St Martin-in-The-Fields II: the Strand, London, pp. 103–108, retrieved 1 October 2019
  41. ^ Eirik (4 July 2013). "Investigating Agatha Christie's Poirot: Episode-by-episode: The Theft of the Royal Ruby". Investigatingpoirot.blogspot.ch. Retrieved 16 February 2016.
  42. ^ "On Location with Poirot - The Plymouth Express". www.tvlocations.net. Retrieved 8 March 2018.

Further reading

This page was last edited on 15 January 2021, at 06:19
Basis of this page is in Wikipedia. Text is available under the CC BY-SA 3.0 Unported License. Non-text media are available under their specified licenses. Wikipedia® is a registered trademark of the Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. WIKI 2 is an independent company and has no affiliation with Wikimedia Foundation.