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Abigail Pogrebin

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Abigail Pogrebin
Born (1965-05-17) May 17, 1965 (age 55)
OccupationWriter
Parent(s)Letty Cottin Pogrebin
Bert Pogrebin
FamilyRobin Pogrebin (sister)

Abigail Pogrebin (born May 17, 1965) is an American writer, journalist, podcast host[1] for Tablet magazine, and former Director of Jewish Outreach for the Michael Bloomberg 2020 presidential campaign.[2]

Family and early life

Pogrebin was born in New York to a Jewish family, the daughter of an author and feminist activist Letty Cottin Pogrebin, the co-founder of Ms. magazine, and Bert Pogrebin, a management-side labor lawyer, and is the identical twin sister of New York Times journalist Robin Pogrebin. She graduated summa cum laude from Yale University.[3][4]

Pogrebin married David Shapiro in 1993, and they have two children.[5][6]

Career

After graduating from Yale in 1987, Pogrebin became a broadcast producer for Mike Wallace, Charlie Rose and associate producer for Ed Bradley at 60 Minutes and Bill Moyers at PBS and before that for The MacNeil/Lehrer Report and Fred W. Friendly.[5][7] Afterwards she turned to freelance journalism and published articles in magazines and newspapers like Newsweek, New York Magazine, The Forward, Tablet, and The Daily Beast.[8][9][10]

She has moderated conversations for The Jewish Community Center in Manhattan (JCC), the Streicker Center, UJA Federation, and the Shalom Hartman Institute.[3]

Pogrebin is the author of My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew, published in 2017,[11][12] which was a finalist for the 2018 National Jewish Book Award, and the 2005 book Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk About Being Jewish,[13] for which she interviewed 62 famous American Jews — from Ruth Bader Ginsburg to Steven Spielberg — about their religious identity. Her second book, One and the Same: My Life As an Identical Twin and What I’ve Learned About Everyone’s Struggle to Be Singular,[14] was published in October 2009. Her 2011 book Showstopper documents her time in the cast of Stephen Sondheim’s musical “Merrily We Roll Along,” which was the subject of the 2016 Netflix documentary film Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened.[15]

She served as the president of New York's Central Synagogue from 2015-2018, and in November 2019 she joined former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg’s presidential campaign as the Director of Jewish Outreach.[16][17]

Tablet Magazine’s podcast, “Parsha in Progress” features a regular Torah discussion with Pogrebin and Rabbi Dov Linzer, who is the president of Yeshivat Chovevei Torah.[18]

Awards

Pogrebin received the “Impact Award”[19] from the JCC in Manhattan, and the “Community Leader Award” from The Jewish Week in 2017.[20] Her 2017 book My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew was a finalist for the 2018 National Jewish Book Award.

Notes

  1. ^ "Parsha in Progress on Apple Podcasts". Apple Podcasts. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  2. ^ Hanau, Shira. "Abigail Pogrebin Joining Bloomberg Campaign As Jewish Liaison". jewishweek.timesofisrael.com. Retrieved 2020-04-03.
  3. ^ a b "Abigail Pogrebin". Muslim-Jewish Advisory Council. Archived from the original on 2019-12-11. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  4. ^ Bolton-Fasman, Judy. "The Spiritual Adventures of Abigail Pogrebin". JewishBoston. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  5. ^ a b "WEDDINGS; Abigail Pogrebin and David Shapiro (Published 1993)". The New York Times. 1993-12-12. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  6. ^ Sandee Brawarsky. "Discovering A Sense Of Belonging". jewishweek.timesofisrael.com. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  7. ^ "Central Synagogue - Abigail Pogrebin - Honorary President". www.centralsynagogue.org. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  8. ^ "Abigail Pogrebin". PearlCo Literary Agency. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  9. ^ November 19, Abi-gail Pogrebin; 2015 (2015-11-19). "30 Days, 30 Authors: Abigail Pogrebin | Jewish Book Council". www.jewishbookcouncil.org. Retrieved 2021-03-01.CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  10. ^ "Abigail Pogrebin". Jewish Women's Archive. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  11. ^ "Abigail Pogrebin's My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew". Fig Tree Books. Retrieved 2017-08-15.
  12. ^ Pogrebin, Abigail. "The Feminist Passover: A (Third) Seder of Her Own". JWI. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  13. ^ "Stars of David", Google Books
  14. ^ "One and the Same", Google Books
  15. ^ Eve, Best Worst Thing That. "How Being Part of A Rare Sondheim Flop Taught Me Lessons for Life". The Forward. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  16. ^ Abigail Pogrebin Joining Bloomberg Campaign As Jewish Liaison article in Times of Israel
  17. ^ "Abigail Pogrebin | Algemeiner.com Breaking Alerts, Commentary, Insights Analysis and Blogs". Algemeiner.com. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  18. ^ "Parsha In Progress". Tablet Magazine. Retrieved 2021-03-01.
  19. ^ JCC 2019 Annual Benefit JCC Official site
  20. ^ Highlights From The Jewish Week Gala 2017 Photo coverage at Times of Israel

External links

This page was last edited on 3 March 2021, at 07:23
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